Category Archives: Books & Reading

Will Eisner Graphic Novel Grants for Libraries

Will Eisner

Two Will Eisner Graphic Novel Grants for Libraries are given annually – the Will Eisner Graphic Novel Growth Grant will provide support to a library that would like to expand its existing graphic novel services and programs and the Will Eisner Graphic Novel Innovation Grant will provides support to a library for the initiation of a graphic novel service, program or initiative. These Grants will support two categorical grants that will encourage public awareness on the rise and importance of graphic literature, sequential art, and comics as a literary medium.  The objective of the Will Eisner Graphic Novel Grants for Libraries is to facilitate library-generated programs and services that will promote graphic novels to library patrons and to the local community.

Will Eisner (1917-2005) was an acclaimed American comics writer, artist, teacher, and entrepreneur.  He is considered one of the most important contributors to the development of sequential art (a term he coined) and is known for the cartooning studio he founded; for his highly influential comic series, The Spirit; for his use of comics as an instructional medium; for his leading role in establishing the graphic novel as a form of literature with his 1978 groundbreaking graphic novel, A Contract with God and Other Tenement Stories; for his 20 years of teaching at the School of Visual Arts, leading to his three textbooks. In a career that spanned nearly seven decades—from the dawn of the comic book to the advent of digital comics—Will Eisner was truly the “Father of the Graphic Novel.”

Each winning library will receive a grant award of $4,000 to support initiatives that align with the objective of the Will Eisner Graphic Novel Grants for Libraries.  The grant award will consist of the following:

  • $2,000 grant to purchase graphic novels from the distributor-partner (current partner is The Brodart company.  Purchase to include cataloging and shipping),
  • $1,000 grant to host a graphic novel-themed event at a library or another community location, and
  • $1,000 grant to attend the ALA Annual Conference to receive their grant money.  This grant can be used towards any of the following: conference registration, transportation, lodging and food.

In addition, from the book publishers and the Eisner Foundation, the winning libraries will also receive the following graphic novels, valued at approximately $3,000:

  • The Will Eisner Library: A graphic novel collection of Will Eisner’s work and biographies about Will Eisner comprising approximately 75 books and;
  • Graphic novels nominated for the current year’s Will Eisner Awards at Comic-Con International comprising approximately 100 books.

Chosen Grant applicant must agree to take responsibility for organizing a recognition ceremony of their grant in their library.

Further details and application information @ ALA.org.

Posted in Books & Reading | Leave a comment

Friday Reads: The Homesman–A novel about Nebraska

HomesmanThe Homesman is a devastating story of early pioneers in 1850s Nebraska. It celebrates the ones we hear nothing of: the brave women whose hearts and minds were broken by a life of bitter hardship. A “homesman” must be found to escort a handful of them back East to a sanitarium. When none of the county’s men steps up, the job falls to Mary Bee Cuddy—ex-teacher, spinster, indomitable and resourceful. Brave as she is, Mary Bee knows she cannot succeed alone. The only companion she can find is the low-life claim jumper George Briggs. Thus begins a trek east, against the tide of colonization, against hardship, Indian attacks, ice storms, and loneliness—a timeless classic told in a series of tough, fast-paced adventures.

Glendon Swarthout’s novel from 1988 won both the Western Writers of America’s Spur Award and the Western Heritage Wrangler Award. A new afterword by the author’s son Miles Swarthout tells of his parents Glendon and Kathryn’s discovery of and research into the lives of the oft-forgotten frontier women who make The Homesman as moving and believable as it is unforgettable.

Having seen a trailer for the recent movie of the same title, starring Hillary Swank and Tommy Lee Jones, I picked up a copy of the book at the airport while my husband and I were traveling this past Christmas.  The minute I started reading it, I was completely pulled in ; it was riveting and shocking, all at the same time.  I highly recommend this book (and movie) about frontier Nebraska.

Posted in Books & Reading | 1 Comment

New Government Publications Received at the Library Commission

NEState SealState government publications ranging from Agriculture to University of Nebraska Press, received November and December, 2014.

Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training, General, Information Resources, What's Up Doc / Govdocs | Leave a comment

A Balloon School in Nebraska?

FortOmahaWhile I was in Rochester, New York this past Christmas visiting my husband’s family, my father-in-law showed me some letters from a World War I 2nd Lieutenant from Spencerport, NY, who had a Nebraska connection. Based on the letters and some further research, I found out that this young man was stationed at Fort Omaha, Nebraska for Balloon School.

Fort Omaha (the Nebraska Memories picture to the left), located at 5730 North 30th Street, in Omaha, Nebraska, was opened in 1868 as an Indian War-era United States Army supply depot for various forts along the Platte River.   This is also where Ponca Chief Standing Bear and 29 fellow Ponca were held prior to the landmark 1879 trial of Standing Bear v. Crook. Judge Elmer Dundy determined that American Indians were persons within the meaning of the law and that the Ponca were illegally detained after leaving Indian Territory in January 1879.  FortOmaha2The Nebraska Memories picture of the fort to the right, was taken about that same time period.

Fort Omaha today is primarily occupied by Metropolitan Community College, but continues to house Navy, Marine and Army Reserve units. The fort is located in the present-day Miller Park neighborhood of North Omaha. The Fort Omaha Historic District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  The district includes the 1879 General Crook House Museum, as well as the 1879 Quartermaster’s office, 1878 commissary, 1884 guardhouse, 1883 ordnance magazine and 1887 mule stables.

In 1907 the Army built a large steel hangar at Fort Omaha for use in experiments with dirigibles, a program that was abandoned in 1909. This program and its successor, the military use of hot air balloons for reconnaissance missions, were part of the American Expeditionary Forces.  A balloon house was built in 1908, and in 1909 the first balloon flight took place.   Here is a picture from Nebraska Memories of the Balloon House at Fort Omaha, taken sometime between 1908 and 1910:

balloonschool4Shortly after the United States entered World War I, 800 men enlisted in the Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corp, one of whom was William Spencer Barker, from Spencerport, NY.  They were immediately sent to the Balloon School at Fort Omaha for training. More than 16,000 airmen went through the Balloon Schools at Fort Omaha and other locations around the U.S., between 1908 and the close of the program in 1919.

Balloonists were trained in map reading and charting troop movements. This information was communicated through an extensive switchboard system to artillery troops on the ground.  The balloons were “captive” stationary balloons, utilized tail fins for stabilization, and had cables to tether the balloon to the ground.

In 1917, 2nd Lieutenant Baker was part of the 5th Squadron, Balloon Division, and did see military action with balloon squadrons in France from 1918-1919.

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images of digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, or contact Beth Goble, Historical Services Librarian, or Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

 

 

 

Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training, General, Information Resources, Library Management, Nebraska Memories, Preservation, Programming, What's Up Doc / Govdocs | Leave a comment

Friday Reads: Coming Home, by Jack McDevitt

Coming HomeComing Home is the seventh Alex Benedict novel by Jack McDevitt. These are not military or thriller science fiction, but they do have a quest, and a quirky pace much like real life. They are narrated by his assistant and pilot, Chase Kolpath. Alex is in the business of antiquities (or salvage, depending on your opinion), thousands of years in the future of a timeline that could be ours. Human empires and cultures have risen and fallen since humans left Earth; so much history is lost due to riots and wars. And much of the history of the early years of space exploration is missing, such as the early flights to the moon. A friend of theirs brings them an early space artifact of mysterious origins and asks for their help in authenticating it. The trail leads finally, to Earth, and more mystery.
Also creating tension for the pair is the fact that Alex’s uncle is on a space liner caught in a space/time warp, which makes the ship available every 5 years, real time, only minutes have elapsed shipside. So that only a few people can be rescued each time, before the ship disappears again, for 5 years. Since Alex owns a yacht, and Chase is the pilot, she is involved in the rescue attempts.
Jack McDevitt definitely has a distinctive voice in the field, and can both create characters that one can care about, as well as interesting science. His pacing is also more like real life, the antique search slowing and speeding up much like a real search with hunches played out and failed, and others popping up. The work on the space liner rescue interrupts regular life, as it would, and then the excitement dies down. It feels much more like living with the characters than the constant roller coaster thrill ride of a science fiction thriller. Much more consideration about the human element and consequences is often given in his work.

Posted in Books & Reading | 1 Comment

NCompass Live: Guys Read: Men of the NLC Talk Books

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Guys Read: Men of the NLC Talk Books”, on Wednesday, January 21, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

The staff at the Nebraska Library Commission are readers. And we enjoy talking about what we’ve read. Join Michael Sauers and Sam Shaw, from the Library Commission, as they share some of their favorite books. You’ll be sure to find a few good additions for your library’s collection.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • January 28 – Tech Talk with Michael Sauers: CES & Libraries 2015
  • February 11 – Fun with Friends: Integrating Programming for Adults with Special Needs Into Your Library
  • February 18 – Anatomy of an Ad Campaign

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training | Leave a comment

What’s Sally Reading?

ALA Youth Media Awards will be Announced on February 2, 2015

The awards ceremony will be broadcast at 8:00 a.m. CT on Monday, Feb. 2, 2015, during the ALA Midwinter Meeting & Exhibition in Chicago.  You can join them live via your computer if you have the time.  Go here to find the link to join their live webcast.  If you prefer, you can follow I Love Libraries on Twitter and Facebook instead.  I will be clicking on the “webcast” link hoping I can be added to the many people joining via the Internet.  If you click the link now, you will see a countdown clock for the event.

I will send out the list of winners and honor books as soon as I receive the press release, so if you are unable to attend you will still learn about the awards not long after the video announcements.

JenkinsCreature Features: Twenty-Five Animals Explain Why They Look the Way They Do by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page.  Their newest title looks at 25 animals with unusual features and explains why they have them.  For example, the leaf-nosed bat uses its unusual nose to direct sounds to its ears.  Art dominates each page with a brief question and answer, readers will be intrigued.  The art always shows the animals head and face from the front, and not much of the rest of their bodies.  Readers may be curious enough to go looking for complete photos or illustrations of the named creatures.  This title is great for preschool through second grade.

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

Posted in Books & Reading, General, Youth Services | Leave a comment

2015 One Book One Nebraska Proclamation

2015 One Book One Nebraska Proclamation (1206x2000)

2015 One Book One Nebraska Proclamation signing ceremony

2015 One Book One Nebraska Proclamation signing ceremony

Posted in Books & Reading | 1 Comment

2015 Nebraska Travel Guide

ChimneyRockThe new 2015 Nebraska Travel Guide is now available free from the Nebraska Travel Commission.
Copies are available individually and in quantities.

To request copies of the 2015 Nebraska Travel Guide please contact Kaitlyn Watermeier at ntc.tourism2@nebraska.gov or call Kaitlyn at 402-471-3744.

Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training, General, Information Resources, Library Management, Programming, Uncategorized, What's Up Doc / Govdocs | Leave a comment

Friday Reads: Wild by Cheryl Strayed

FRStrayed179My husband and I recently saw the movie based on this book, which we enjoyed though there are certainly some tough things the author went through in her life. The film did leave us with some questions and when we saw a paperback copy at the bookstore we both immediately wanted to buy it to learn more about her experiences.  I have always been intrigued by long distance endurance hikes, such as the Appalachian Trail, and this story and trail also caught my attention.

I am closing in on the halfway mark on the book. It has answered a few questions already, and given me a look at what is involved in succeeding with challenge of this nature, as well as the impact it had on the author’s life.  I did enjoy occasional backpack trips in the Rocky Mountain National Park when I lived in Colorado, but those were only one or two nights.  This is, of course, an entirely different level of hiking.

The book does some jumping back and forth between her hike on the Pacific Crest Trail and the things in the author’s past that sent her to the trail.  Readers may be astounded at times at her lack of preparedness, but will likely want to know more about her experience, as I do.  I will emphasize that this is an adult book, since I am known for reading books for children and teens, and is one I am eager to finish.

Posted in Books & Reading, General | Leave a comment

Nebraska Learns 2.0: Resolutions and Navigation

The Nebraska Learns 2.0 Thing for January is New Year’s Learning Resolutions

For this month’s Thing, we’d like you to think about your personal professional development – what would you like to accomplish this year? And since it’s the start of a new year, we’ll make it official with a New Year’s Learning Resolution.

Another facet of Nebraska Learns 2.0 is BookThing. Each month we pick a single title that we feel has relevance to librarianship and/or information theory. Some of the titles will be very obviously related, while others may not seem so on the surface but there is a connection. Your assignment will be to read the book and create a blog post answering some questions about the title.

The BookThing for January is Inner Navigation: Why We Get Lost and How We Find Our Way by Erik Johnsson.

Nebraska Learns 2.0 is the Nebraska Library Commission’s ongoing online learning CarhengeCrop5program. It is a self-discovery program which encourages participants to take control of their own learning and to utilize their lifelong learning skills through exploration and PLAY.

Each month, we offer you an opportunity to learn a new Thing (or lesson). You have all month to complete that Thing and receive one CE credit. You may choose which Things to do based on personal interest and time availability If the Thing of the month doesn’t interest you or if you are particularly busy that month, you can skip it.

If you are new to Nebraska Learns 2.0, your first assignment is to sign up to participate. This program is open to ALL Nebraska librarians, library staff, library friends, library board members and school media specialists.

We hope you’ll join your library colleagues in the fun as you learn about new and exciting technologies!

Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training, Technology | Leave a comment

Recently on the NCompass Podcast

Podcast IconHave you listened to the NCompass Podcast lately? Here are the episodes from December 2014. To get all of the episodes delivered to you automatically be sure to subscribe via RSS or iTunes.

 

 

Episode 312: Addressing the Legal Information Needs of Immigrants and Non Native Speakers

Episode 313: Best New Youth Books of 2014

Episode 314: Nebraska Memories

Episode 315: Installing and Using the OverDrive App: A Day-Before-Christmas Refresher!

Episode 316: Tech Talk with Michael Sauers: WordPress and SEO/SMO

Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training, Technology | Leave a comment

NCompass Live: Extreme Customer Service @ Your Library

NCompass live smallJoin us for the first NCompass Live of 2015, “Extreme Customer Service @ Your Library”, on Wednesday, January 7, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

While providing innovative services and programming helps draw new library patrons, excellence in customer service is what keeps them coming back. Kearney Public Library has recently embraced a more patron-focused approach to library policies, which has included changing many policies to create a more positive experience for patrons. Staff members will discuss their new “Extreme Customer Service” model, and how it has changed many of their library practices over the past year. This session will include tips on how libraries of all sizes and budgets can make small and large-scale changes to improve the level of customer service they offer to their patrons.

Presenters: Matthew Williams, Director, and Christine Walsh, Assistant Director, Kearney (NE) Public Library.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • January 21, 2015 – Guys Read: Men of the NLC Talk Books
  • January 28, 2015 – Tech Talk with Michael Sauers

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

 

 

 

 

Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training | Leave a comment

Friday Reads: The Ritual of Illusion by Richard Christian Matheson

Ritual of Illusion by Richard Christian Matheson“A sinister love letter to the movies, acclaimed author Richard Christian Matheson s The Ritual Of Illusion is a novella of modern fear about where stars truly come from. Oscar-winning film siren, Sephanie Vamore, meteors to iconic fame . . . but like cinema itself, nothing is as it appears. The fifty witnesses to her mythic ascent and bizarre fate are film royalty . . . many based on Hollywood glitterati; directors, stars, agents, studio heads, screenwriters, lovers, producers. Widescreen with lies and revelation, Vamore s story is told Rashomon-style with dialogue alone each hypnotic character adding poignant or lurid details to the shocking truth of what she really is. Matheson s insider s voice is a scathing x-ray that leaves them bloodied, awaiting their close-up.” (via Amazon.com)

Posted in Books & Reading | Leave a comment

The Data Dude – Dark Nights of the Soul

dark nightsIn an earlier post, I postulated that the philosophy of author Thomas Moore (Dark Night of the Soul: A Guide to Finding Your Way Through Life’s Ordeals) seems to me to be a formidable alternative (or response) to my own intermittent struggles with pessimism. The obvious question is: How on earth might this relate to libraries? Read on, but for the time being, I believe it is necessary to expound on some ideas to further relate what’s been on my mind. It’s at least important to me, and it may also be important to you. Who Knows? If you don’t think so and would rather not waste your time on the filler material, skip to the last two paragraphs (that’s the library part). If this is a ride you’d rather not be on, no offense if you leave right now. Hey, at least I’m not bugging you about a survey.

According to Vered Arnon, Nietzsche repeatedly stressed that nihilism is a “transitional stage”. It is a facilitator for a reevaluation of one’s values, or a new way of thinking about who we are. The freedom comes in accepting the reality of this transition. In her Radiolab podcast, Brooke Gladstone summarizes the Sisyphean nature of this: “I think there are cycles in which the sense of meaningless comes out in sharper relief than other times, but you can identify them over and over again.” I’m learning that trying to avoid my own dark nights and failing to realize the transitional or perhaps synthesizing effect they might have on my life only leads to more despair. The recognition of the importance of this synthesis is an essential catalyst to help discover self, soul, true diversity, community, and empathy.  Part of this discovery involves expression in one form of another. I am extremely grateful for the opportunity for self-expression in the form of this blog (throwing in a bit of gratitude doesn’t hurt, either). Again, Brooke Gladstone:

“Camus [said] that the best response is to rebel. Rebel against death, create life on your own terms. Build it for yourself. And one way or another we do. Sometimes we don’t live a very conscious life. But we’re living life. I just think that, this time if anything, we have just grown vaguely uncomfortable in this life that seems so chaotic. But in our lives barely touches us. Essentially, we’re taking in the world through the media. So it may feel more deadening, but it’s less intense. If you had to confront it because the conditions of your life have just crumbled to dust and your beliefs can no longer be sustained, I bet you’d have more energy for it.”

Part of my purpose in posting these blogs (in addition to it being somewhat cathartic for myself and hopefully somewhat informative for you) is an attempt to relate a certain sense of trust, uniformity, significance, purpose, and relationship. I think that this has the potential to be applicable for libraries, how your run your shops, and how you relate to your library visitors and each other. Most of us librarians feel an overwhelming sense of commitment to community. Some of us have lost touch with that, including where we live, the individual persons we serve, the larger community events, places, and being (and feeling) connected. I’d like to think the library story can be more than the things (physical, digital, and virtual) offered, and more than the tools used to tell the story (inforaphics, graphs, and statistics). While the things (physical, digital, and virtual) are essential parts of the library’s existence, they tell us nothing about the real world we live in. The things and services that libraries provide can be important catalysts in building community, connectedness, and soul among individuals, but it requires the individuals working independently of all the stuff that libraries offer. The stuff only provides more opportunity for connection.

By their nature, libraries should function as empathetic places that can facilitate these individual and collective life transformations. Sometimes, this can be as simple as providing a book for someone to read (e.g. my Dark Nights of the Soul example); other times it might be providing a safe place that offers opportunities to feed compassion (either staff/visitor, visitor/visitor, or staff/staff); still at other times, it might be community sponsored events by the library that build relationships between people. I’ve heard of some great library programs in Nebraska where librarians go out in the community for events that build these kinds of relationships instead of waiting behind the desk for someone to wander in. One very important factor is acknowledging that those who frequent libraries (or who may be coming to them for the first time), might be in the middle of their own Dark Night of the Soul, and might have few other places to turn. Or they just might choose to turn to the library in an auxiliary fashion, even though there are other places or support systems that are available to them. Either way, providing a warm, welcoming, non-judgmental environment is essential to this self-discovery. I suppose one of the reasons I mention this is to acknowledge my own day to day doldrums and routines. Annie Dillard, in The Writing Life, concluded that: “How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives.” It might be worth noting that I think we often get caught up in trying to find a larger, higher meaning in our lives, or suffer greatly if we don’t think we’ve found or achieved it. Simplicity should be something that is valued and cherished, rather than something that is underrated or unappreciated. Most, if not all, work is inherently meaningless. Iyeshka Farmer sums this up much better than I can: “It is not our work that gives meaning to our lives. It is our living fully, deep in awareness of our Being, our values, and our vision, that gives meaning to our work-regardless of what that work is.” Shaka.

 

Posted in Books & Reading, General, Library Management, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

What’s Sally Reading?

<>Journals Reveal Their Choices in Best Books:

Three journals have presented theirs lists of best books of 2014 giving us all a good chance to look and see what we may have missed.   Kirkus listed the hilarious early chapter book Let’s Get Cracking by Cyndi Marko, first title in the “Kung Pow Chicken” series and perfect for next summer.  Booklist includes Kenneth Oppel’s Boundless on their list.  And  as I mentioned in my last post, the School Library Journal  list is here.  They include one of my favorite nonfiction titles of the year: Red Madness: How a Medical Mystery Changed What we Eat by Gail Jarrow.

I hope you have fun perusing the lists, happy that you have already purchased some of the titles, and deciding which other ones you will add to your collection. My “to read” list just doubled.

McDonnell177A Perfectly Messed-Up Story by Patrick McDonnell is a terrific read-aloud for story time.  The main character, Louie, is happily skipping along, but when you turn the page you see he was headed for a splat of jelly someone spilled on the book.  His story becomes completely derailed as more damage is found.  Kids will love his reaction to the mess and while there is one page that is dictatorial about how to treat books, they will enjoy the message.

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

Posted in Books & Reading, General, Youth Services | Leave a comment

NCompass Live: Tech Talk with Michael Sauers: WordPress and SEO/SMO

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live: “Tech Talk with Michael Sauers: WordPress and SEO/SMO”, on Wednesday, December 31, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

JD Thomas, a white-hat SEO and WordPress consultant, will discuss how to improve the appearance of WordPress posts and pages in search engine results and when shared on social media. He will be focusing on the features built into Yoast’s WordPress SEO and the metadata that it adds to your website that lets you control exactly how your content looks when shared on Facebook and Twitter.

In this monthly feature of NCompass Live, the NLC’s Technology Innovation Librarian, Michael Sauers, will discuss the tech news of the month and share new and exciting tech for your library. There will also be plenty of time in each episode for you to ask your tech questions. So, bring your questions with you, or send them in ahead of time, and Michael will have your answers.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • January 7, 2015 – Extreme Customer Service @ Your Library
  • January 21, 2015 – Guys Read: Men of the NLC Talk Books
  • January 28, 2015 – Tech Talk with Michael Sauers

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

 

 

 

Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training | Leave a comment

Apply by Jan. 28, 2015 for “The Big Read” Grants

The Big Read is accepting applications for grants between $2,500 and $20,000. The Big Read supports organizations across the country in developing community-wide programs which encourage reading and participation by diverse audiences. Nebraska libraries are invited to apply before Jan. 28, 2015. Visit the Application Process page at http://neabigread.org/application_process.php for more information.

Posted in Books & Reading, General, Programming, Public Relations | Leave a comment

NCompass Live: Installing and Using the OverDrive App: A Day-Before-Christmas Refresher!

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live: “Installing and Using the OverDrive App: A Day-Before-Christmas Refresher!”, on Wednesday, December 24, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

‘Tis the day before Christmas and all through the land, librarians brace for the upcoming influx of patrons with new tablets wanting to know how to access OverDrive….

Sound familiar or prescient? If so, join us for this December 24 edition of NCompass Live for a refresher/review of how to install the OverDrive app on a tablet and start checking out and downloading eBooks and audiobooks from your library. (We’ll be using an iPad, but the app works similarly on Android devices .) We’ll also show you where to find device-specific “Getting Started” articles and videos within OverDrive’s online Help.

Presenter: Susan Knisely, Online Services Librarian, Nebraska Library Commission.
Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • December 31 – Tech Talk with Michael Sauers: WordPress and SEO/SMO
  • January 7, 2015 – Extreme Customer Service @ Your Library
  • January 21, 2015 – Guys Read: Men of the NLC Talk Books

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

 

 

Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training | Leave a comment

Friday Reads: The Mark of the Assassin, by Daniel Silva

bookMarkoftheAssassinThis is one of those authors I wish would write faster. I recently discovered Daniel Silva’s thrillers about Gabriel Allon, Israeli spy/assassin and restorer of great masters.  I’m a little late to the party–Silva has made the bestseller lists for years now–but I’ve made up for lost time and binged.  Read–or mostly, listened to–all 14 books in the series (so far.)  Now I’m going back to read one of Silva’s earlier titles, The Mark of the Assassin.  It’s been fun, partly because it contains a number of precursors to the Allon books, and partly because, as with Silva’s other books, the writing is good, the plotting is fast-paced and twisty, the characters are interesting, and the issues and events in the book seem so dreadfully plausible.  There’s plenty of action, but I think The Mark of the Assassin contains a little less gadgetry and hardware and a little more thinking than many spy thrillers.  Silva, Daniel. The mark of the assassin. New York: Villard, 1998.

 

Posted in Books & Reading | Tagged | Leave a comment