Category Archives: Education & Training

NCompass Live: VoteLibraries 2020 – Thinking About Elections and Libraries Without Being Partisan

Learn how to ‘VoteLibraries 2020 – Thinking About Elections and Libraries Without Being Partisan’  on next week’s FREE NCompass Live webinar on Wednesday, November 20, 10:00am-11:00am CT.

Libraries have a natural non-partisan role to encourage and support civic engagements like voter registration and issue-awareness. For example, EveryLibrary is a sponsoring organization and steering committee member for National Voter Registration Day and is the library coordinating partner for National Disability Voter Registration Week each year. Next year, they plan to relaunch #VoteLibraries2020 to help put non-partisan library issues on the local, state, and federal landscape. In this conversation, EveryLibrary Executive Director John Chrastka will talk about these voter-facing public education campaigns and other activities that they have planned.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Nov. 27 – Pretty Sweet Tech – Design Thinking: How Technology is Made
  • Dec. 4 – Libraries and the LGBT+ Experience
  • Dec. 11 – Librarian in Training – For Kids!
  • Dec. 24 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Dec. 31 – Summer Reading Program 2020: Imagine Your Story

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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A History of the Census in the United States: Part 5

The Fifth Census: Census Day was June 1, 1830.

Andrew Jackson was President of the United States
on Census Day, June 1, 1830.

Authorizing Legislation

President John Q. Adams, in his fourth address to the U.S. Congress on December 28, 1828, recommended starting the census earlier in the year than August 1. He also proposed that the collection of age data be extended from infancy, in intervals of 10 years, “to the utmost boundaries of life.” These changes were incorporated into the census act of March 23, 1830.

Enumeration

As in the previous census, marshals or their assistants visited every dwelling house for enumeration, or, as the law stated, made a personal inquiry of the head of every family in their district. Because of delays in the compilation of the census returns, the filing date was extended to August 1, 1831.

In 1830, enumerators used uniform printed schedules for the first time. In prior censuses, marshals had used whatever paper was available and had designed and bound the sheets themselves. Because federal census clerks did not have to sort through a huge variety of schedules in 1830, they were able to tabulate census results more efficiently.

The 1830 census counted the population only. After the failures of the past two censuses, no attempt was made to collect additional data on manufacturing and industry in the United States.

Further Information

Information provided from Census.gov

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NCompass Live: United for Libraries – Trustees, Advocates, Friends, and Foundations: The Voice for America’s Libraries

Learn how your library can benefit from the resources at ‘United for Libraries – Trustees, Advocates, Friends, and Foundations: The Voice for America’s Libraries’ on next week’s FREE NCompass Live webinar on Wednesday, November 13, 10:00am-11:00am CT.

Beth Nawalinski, executive director of United for Libraries, the Association of Library Trustees, Advocates, Friends and Foundations, a division of the American Library Association, will be joined by 2019-2020 United for Libraries President Peter Pearson, founder/senior consultant of Library Strategies Consulting Group. Beth and Peter will share their ideas about United for Libraries’ mission and vision, and how Nebraska and its libraries can benefit and fully use the resources available through this dynamic ALA division. Learn about Nebraska’s statewide membership, including online trainings that are available free to all Nebraska public libraries. Hear about United for Libraries’ Baker & Taylor Award. Tina Walker, director of Keene Memorial Library in Fremont, NE, will discuss the Friends of Keene Memorial Library’s Baker & Taylor Award-winning project.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Nov. 20 – VoteLibraries 2020 – Thinking About Elections and Libraries Without Being Partisan
  • Nov. 27 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Dec. 4 – Libraries and the LGBT+ Experience
  • Dec. 11 – Librarian in Training – For Kids!
  • Dec. 24 – Pretty Sweet Tech

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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‘E-rate: What’s New for 2020?’ Recording now available

The recording and presentation slides of the E-rate: What’s New for 2020? online session are now available.

What is E-rate? How do I apply for E-rate? How can my library get its piece of the E-rate pie?

E-rate is a federal program that provides discounts to schools and public libraries on the cost of their Internet Access and Connections to make these services more affordable. This includes Broadband, Fiber, and Wi-Fi Internet access as well as Internal Connections, such as wiring, routers, switches, and other network equipment.

The E-Rate Productivity Center (EPC) is your online portal for all E-rate interactions. With your organizational account you can use EPC to file forms, track your application status, communicate with USAC, and more.

In this workshop, Christa Porter, Nebraska’s State E-rate Coordinator for Public Libraries, will cover the basics of the E-rate program and show you how to access and use your account in EPC to submit your Funding Year 2020 E-rate application.

If you have any questions or need any assistance with your E-rate forms, visit the NLC E-rate webpage or please contact Christa Porter, 800-307-2665, 402-471-3107.

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Resources for Libraries and the 2020 Census

Apply by Nov. 22 for Library Census Equity Fund

The American Library Association (ALA) is accepting applications for Library Census Equity Fund mini-grants until Nov. 22. ALA will provide 25 libraries with $2,000 mini-grants to bolster their service to hard-to-count communities and help achieve a complete count in the 2020 Census.

Census hiring: Nov. 6 webinar and new tip sheet

The U.S. Census Bureau is currently hiring 500,000 temporary workers for the 2020 Census through an online application process. To achieve a complete count in the 2020 Census, the Census Bureau needs to recruit qualified and diverse applicants in every part of the country. To learn how libraries can promote awareness of 2020 Census job opportunities, register for ALA’s free webinar on Nov. 6 and read ALA’s new tip sheet, “How Can My Library Increase Awareness of 2020 Census Hiring?” (PDF).

Preparing your library for the Census: Nov. 14 webinar and new tip sheet

With the 2020 Census just a few months away, how can libraries prepare, and what funding sources may be available to support libraries’ preparations and activities? Learn more at ALA’s free webinar on Nov. 14 and read ALA’s new tip sheet, “Preparing My Library for the 2020 Census” (PDF).

Trustees invited to become Library Census Champions

Library Census Champions is a new network of state, local and tribal library Trustees helping their libraries and communities prepare for the 2020 Census. Elected and appointed library Trustees can sign up to become a Library Census Champion and receive free information, resources, and actions to take to ensure a fair and accurate census. To learn more about this program, Register to watch the recording on-demand.

Census resources from ALACheck ala.org/census for updates through the 2020 Census as ALA continues to add new resources. For instance, find Libraries Transform images, template presentation slides (PPTX) and presenter notes (PDF)

Upcoming events

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Continuing Education Grants!

Start planning ahead early and apply! This year, the Nebraska Library Commission is offering individuals $500 grants to attend the annual Association for Rural & Small Libraries (ARSL) 2020 Conference in Wichita, Kansas (Sept. 30th to Oct. 3rd)! Funding could go towards the cost of travel, hotel, meals, and/or registration costs.

text right side "CE Grants ARSL 2020 Kansas" text left side "due 12/13/19" link below nlc.nebraska.gov/grants/ce all on a red background

This is an awesome opportunity to attend an out-of-state (but nearby) conference focused on rural and small libraries! Details about the grant, along with the application forms can be found in the links below. Applications are due by December 13, 2019!

ARSL logo: tree with green and blue leaves, text "The association for rural and small libraries" link below arsl.info

The purpose of these grants is to assist Nebraska libraries to improve the library services provided to their communities through continuing education and training for their library personnel and supporters. CE grants are open to applicants who are either 1) currently employed in an accredited Nebraska public library at the time of application and for the duration of the conference or a 2) current board member of an accredited Nebraska public library at the time of application and for the duration of the conference.

If you have any questions, please contact Holli Duggan, CE Coordinator.

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A History of the Census in the United States: Part 4

The Fourth Census: Census Day was August 7, 1820.

James Monroe was President of the United States
on Census Day, August 7, 1820.

Authorizing Legislation

The fourth census was taken in accordance with the census act of March 14, 1820, which required more detailed population-related inquiries than earlier enumerations. This census is notable for being the first to inquire if respondents were engaged in agriculture, commerce, or manufacturing.

Enumeration

The enumeration began on the first Monday of August. Its scheduled six-month completion time frame was extended by about seven months to September 1, 1821. As in previous decades, the 1820 census act again required assistant marshals to visit every dwelling house, or head of every family within their designated districts.

Data relating to manufacturing were collected by assistants in each district, sent to the marshals, and then transmitted to the secretary of state along with the population returns. The report on manufacturing presented the data for these establishments by counties, but the results were not summarized for each district and the aggregate statement that was released was based on incomplete returns. The 1820 manufacturing census suffers the same criticism as that in 1810: Poor enumerator training resulted in dramatic variations in data quality and accuracy.

Further Information

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November is Native American Heritage Month

November is National American Indian Heritage MonthThe Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the rich ancestry and traditions of Native Americans.

Visit the National American Indian Heritage Month website to view a Calendar of Events, Exhibits and Collections, Audio and Video, Resources for Teachers, Images, and much more!

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NCompass Live: Feeding America: Gardens, Seed Exchanges, Summer Meals, and More!

Learn how you can start Feeding America at your library on next week’s FREE NCompass Live webinar on Wednesday, November 6, 10:00am-11:00am CT.

Three-quarters of the counties with the highest rates of food insecurity are in rural areas. This session will cover how public libraries feed America: 1) Distributing food at the library, 2) Teaching and supporting gardening, 3) Teaching how to prepare healthy food, and 4) Offering the library’s support to food programs (e.g. Farmers Markets). We will then go over how you can use the resources of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, including its Cooperative Extension, Summer Food Service, 4-H, and Master Gardener programs. We will conclude with interactive discussion on how you can start feeding America at your library.

Presenter: Noah Lenstra, Assistant Professor of Library and Information Science, University of North Carolina Greensboro and Director of Let’s Move in Libraries

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Nov. 13 – United for Libraries – Trustees, Advocates, Friends, and Foundations: The Voice for America’s Libraries
  • Nov. 20 – VoteLibraries 2020 – Thinking About Elections and Libraries Without Being Partisan
  • Dec. 4 – Libraries and the LGBT+ Experience
  • Dec. 11 – Librarian in Training – For Kids!

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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2020 Census: The Law Is Clear–Personal Information Cannot Be Shared

The mission of the Census Bureau is to serve as the nation’s leading provider of quality statistics about its people and economy. They couldn’t produce this information without you. Responsible data stewardship is how they maintain your trust. Being responsible stewards of your data is not only required by law but also embedded in their culture.

The Law Protects Your Information. Under Title 13 of the U.S. Code, your information must be kept confidential, and your answers cannot be used against you by any government agency or court. Anyone who violates this law faces severe penalties.

They Use Cutting-Edge Safeguards To Protect Your Identity. They do not identify individuals in the statistics they publish. Their policies and safeguards help them ensure the confidentiality of your information. Our Disclosure Review Board verifies that any product they release meets their confidentiality standards. Click on the link to learn more about the U.S Census Bureau’s Data Protection and Privacy Program: Find Out More.

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Resources for Veterans, their Families, Caregivers, and Survivors

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Nebraska Department of Veterans Affairs websites offer many resources for Veterans, their families, caregivers, and survivors.

For example, the U.S. VA website offers information on GI Bill benefits, Healthcare, Disability, Education, Veterans Day information and discounts, a website to help find old service friends, informational podcasts and webinars, and much, much more. You can even sign up for email updates to receive the latest news about VA benefits.

The Nebraska Department of Veterans Affairs website offers similar information, but more specifically for Nebraska Veterans. Job Fairs in Nebraska, general veterans employment, who to contact for veterans financial aid, tuition aid, and a guide to disability claims & appeals, just to name a few.

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November Health Outreach Resources

November is …

  • National Family Health History Month
  • National American Indian Heritage Month
  • American Diabetes Month

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine has just released resources to help you plan health programs and promote health information during November. Links include a program kit, webinars, electronic bulletin slides, posters, and social media materials. Visit this page for more details: https://nnlm.gov/all-of-us/national-health-observances#toc-9.

Healthfinder.gov offers a toolkit for American Diabetes Month. The toolkit provides ideas for hosting a community event, and resources to share health information through your website, newsletter, or social media. Visit this page for more details: https://healthfinder.gov/NHO/NovemberToolkit.aspx.

Christian Minter, MSLIS
Community Engagement and Health Literacy Librarian
Coordinator of Circulation Services
Assistant Professor
McGoogan Library of Medicine
University of Nebraska Medical Center
986705 Nebraska Medical Center | Omaha, NE 68198-6705
402-559-7226

christian.minter@unmc.edu

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The Census and Special Districts in the U.S.

From Municipalities to Special Districts, Official Count of Every Type of Local Government is in the 2017 Census of Governments.

We know what counties and municipalities are. But what are special districts?  

Special districts are independent government units created for a limited, specific purpose and, every year, new districts are created and existing ones dissolve.

The latest in-depth, encyclopedic count of special districts and all types of local governments in the United States is now available.

Released earlier this year, the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2017 Census of Governments Organization component provides statistics on governments in the United States as of June 2017 and shows changes since the last count in 2012.

Tables show counts by government type, state, population-size groups, function and school systems. 

Local governments are classified into five types: county, municipal, township, special districts and school districts.  

County, municipal and township governments are general-purpose governments. The official count for those types of governments has not changed significantly since 2012.

Then there are special districts.

They typically have a shorter lifespan and higher turnover than general purpose governments, but the difference in their counts was also relatively slim between 2012 and 2017: The 2017 Census of Governments added more than 1,500 special districts and removed roughly 1,260 that are no longer operating.

Nebraska Examples of Special Districts

Airport Authorities, Cemetery Districts, Community Building Districts, County Fair Boards, Drainage Districts, Hospital Districts and Authorities, Housing Agencies, Interstate County Bridge Commissions, Irrigation Districts, Joint Electric Power, Sewerage and Solid Waste Disposal, Water Distribution Agencies—1981 Law, Joint Public Power Authorities—1982 Law, Metropolitan Transit Authority, Metropolitan Utilities Districts, Natural Resources Districts, Public Power Districts, Reclamation Districts, Risk Management Pools, Road and Street Improvement Districts—1957 and 1961 Laws, Rural and Suburban Fire Protection Districts, Rural Water Districts, and Sanitary and Improvement Districts.

Why So Many New Special Districts?

So why are states creating special districts these days?  

In some cases, states create them to provide services to newly- developed geographic areas.

In other cases, the special purpose activity or services already exist, but residents expect a higher level of quality.  

For example, a state may have fire protection services. However, the established governmental structure may not legally allow the fire district to raise enough funds to maintain the desired level of quality services.  

That’s when a state may choose to create a special district. Most special districts can levy additional property or sales taxes, and may borrow money to buy or build facilities by issuing bonds.  

Some districts are only active for a limited time, usually as long as it takes to pay back a debt.

Multifunction Districts

Between the 2012 and 2017 census, multifunction districts grew the most.  

Multifunction districts can collect property taxes and issue tax-exempt bonds. Legislation authorizing multifunction districts was passed in most states across the nation in the 1980s.

For example:

  • In Colorado, the 2017 Census of Governments added close to 270 metropolitan districts to the master list of local governments in the state.  

Metropolitan districts can provide a wide array of services, such as fire protection, street improvements, recreation, mosquito control and television relay services.  

These districts can collect property taxes and issue public debt. That’s why it’s important to keep track of public funds controlled by these districts.  

Most of the metropolitan districts in Colorado are development districts created to provide funding for development projects.

  • In Texas, multifunction districts, called Municipal Utility Districts (MUDs), also showed growth. The 2017 Census of Governments added nearly 200 units to the master list of local governments in Texas.  

MUDs provide a variety of utility services in areas not included in a municipality. These districts can finance developing infrastructure and housing.

MUDs can incur public debts in the form of bonds to finance infrastructure and/or housing, and may dissolve in 15 to 25 years after the debt is paid in full.  

As in Colorado, developers who see public-private partnerships as business opportunities usually drive the creation of multifunction districts.  

Development And Water Supply Districts

Financing capital improvement was the leading force behind special district growth in Florida.  

The 2017 Census of Governments added about 130 new Community Development Districts (CDD). In Florida, CDDs may finance a variety of community development projects, such as new sewage facilities.  

The 2017 Individual State Descriptions publication provides a comprehensive description of the governmental organization for the 50 states and the District of Columbia.  

Some of these districts are similar to Community Improvement Associations (CIAs) in size and scale of operations. Both are a result of the housing boom from 2003 to 2008.

The major difference is that CDDs are considered public government units that enjoy some tax exemptions, although this comes with other regulations and required transparency in governing these districts.

The 2017 Census of Governments data also reflect the creation of more water supply districts in New Mexico. Over 150 Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Associations were included as special district governments since the last census. Other states, including California, Arkansas, Missouri and Washington, also added between 10 to 20 water supply districts.

Fire And Emergency Services Districts

Nationally, Emergency Services Districts (ESD) that provide local fire protection and ambulance services have grown this decade: 150 were created from 2012 to 2017 — 130 of them in Texas.  

The increase is centered in areas experiencing the fastest population growth in the country since the 2010 Census.

Often, ESDs are organized as a funding tool for existing volunteer fire departments.  These allow volunteer fire districts to collect additional property and sales taxes to provide service to their expanding communities.

It can be challenging to find fire-fighting funding in areas losing population and experiencing declining property values.

In Arizona, for example, laws passed in 2013 allow fire districts to consolidate into fire authorities to reduce overhead costs. The 2017 Census of Governments shows 14 new joint fire authorities in Ohio.  

Some township volunteer fire departments have recently begun to combine personnel, equipment and property tax revenue to become official special district governments.

Another way districts can improve emergency response and rescue operations is by creating Emergency Communications (911) Districts to help coordinate resources between municipalities, counties and other local governments.

Some states, including Texas, Iowa, and Oregon, have had them since 1985. Others like Washington and Massachusetts have recently introduced laws enabling citizens to create 911 districts.

Download the Individual State Descriptions: 2017 Census of Governments

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A History of the Census in the United States : Part 3

The 3rd Census: Census Day was August 6, 1810

James Madison was President of the United States on Census Day, August 6, 1810.

Authorizing Legislation

The authorization act for the third census stipulated that an assistant marshal must actually visit each household, or the head of each family, within his designated enumeration district and should not rely on hearsay or the like to complete his count. The act also mandated that the enumeration commence on the first Monday of August.

Enumeration

An act of May 1, 1810 amended the earlier authorizing legislation to require that, while they were collecting demographic data, assistant marshals also collect available economic data. These men recorded the “several manufacturing establishments and manufactures within their several districts, territories, and divisions.” The marshals transmitted the manufacturing data to the secretary of the treasury at the same time they sent the results of the population enumeration to the secretary of state. No schedule was prescribed for the collection of industrial data and the nature of the inquiries were at the discretion of the secretary of the treasury. Because of this, the collection of manufacturing data was so erratic that it was generally considered useless except to identify broad industrial trends.

Intercensal Activity

An act of May 16, 1812, provided for the publication of a digest of manufactures containing data on the kind, quality, and value of goods manufactured, the number of establishments, and the number of machines of various kinds used in certain classes of manufactures. The report containing incomplete returns for more than 200 kinds of goods and including several items that were principally agricultural, was published in 1813.

Further Information

Information provided from Census.gov

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Continuing Education: Library Boards

This week we’re focusing CE for all those wonderful library board members!

Below is a list of resources with helpful reference information for new and current library board members (or for anyone curious what library boards do), followed by several upcoming or recorded webinars.

Blue background with white text "All about library boards" with three small icons above: computer, book, keyboard

Resources:

Webinars:

  • Working Effectively with Your Library Trustees – United for Libraries*
    • “[L]earn tips and strategies for working effectively with your Trustees. Topics include orientation for new Trustees, understanding roles, meetings, emergencies, and effective communication.”
  • Equity, Diversity, Inclusion: What Library Trustees Need to Know – United for Libraries*
    • “This workshop will help trustees and library directors understand how to incorporate EDI into policy development, strategic planning, funding initiatives, board development, and more.”
  • Troubled Library Boards: Prevention & Survival – United for Libraries*
    • “What essential practices can prevent or minimize board problems? When a board does become dysfunctional, how can those involved survive and create change?”
  • Library Accessibility – What Public Library Trustees Need to Know (RAILS)
    • “In this webinar…Renee Grassi will equip Library Trustees with the information and tools they need to be more effective accessibility advocates for their library communities.”
  • Build a Culture of Learning with Library Boards – WebJunction & ARSL
    • “Trustees can and should play a key role in fostering a culture of learning at their libraries – beginning with themselves. When library boards embrace a learning culture, they become more receptive to supporting continuing education, in policy, planning and budgeting.”
  • The Rural Library Trustee: Roles, Responsibilities, and Relationships – WebJunction & ARSL
    • “will provided you with practical ideas and tactical strategies to support and advocate for your library organization as a trustee, or library director in a small or rural community.”
  • Toward Tech Savvy Trustees – WebJunction & ARSL
    • “The more that trustees are dialed into a personal use of technology, the better advocates they will be for the library’s technology needs. Learn some fun and practical ways to inspire greater tech savviness in your trustees.”

*The Nebraska Library Commission has prepaid for all Nebraska public library directors, members of Friends organizations, Foundation boards, and trustees to participate free of charge in online training and access to education resources offered by the American Library Association’s United for Libraries. Please contact Holli Duggan or Linda Babcock for login information.

For webinars and CE: If you would like to earn continuing education (CE) credit and are enrolled in the Nebraska Public Librarian Certification program, please submit a “CE Activity Report Form” after each webinar.

If you have any questions about continuing education, please contact Holli Duggan.

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NCompass Live: Pretty Sweet Tech – The Power of the Internet: Use it Wisely

The Power of the Internet – learn how to Use it Wisely on the next FREE NCompass Live webinar, on Wednesday, October 30, 10:00am-11:00am CT.

New special monthly episodes of NCompass Live! Join the NLC’s Technology Innovation Librarian, Amanda Sweet, as she guides us through the world of library-related Pretty Sweet Tech.

Perhaps you have noticed that teenagers have become one with their smartphone. Take away their phone and it’s like they just lost a limb. But is the internet good for more than just social media, meme generators, and finding craft inspiration? Why yes. Yes it is.

This session is about all the things the internet can do, and how your library can leverage internet-powered tools to bring people into the library. What are these magical tools? Here are some examples:

  • Buy things online to save time and money
  • Build or grow your business online
  • Search for jobs online
  • Develop new skills through online learning
  • Connect with friends and family
  • Spread ideas and inspiration
  • Find answers to common questions

In fact, there is an almost ridiculous number of things we can do online. That’s probably why teenagers are glued to their phones. It’s like a whole world inside a tiny, little box. This session is about the little things we can do as librarians to encourage patrons to use their digital world to improve real life. Let’s show people what’s possible through library events, curated information resources, and good old-fashioned conversations. It’s the librarian way.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Nov. 6 – Feeding America: Gardens, Seed Exchanges, Summer Meals, and More!
  • Nov. 13 – United for Libraries – Trustees, Advocates, Friends, and Foundations: The Voice for America’s Libraries
  • Nov. 20 – VoteLibraries 2020 – Thinking About Elections and Libraries Without Being Partisan
  • Dec. 4 – Libraries and the LGBT+ Experience
  • Dec. 11 – Librarian in Training – For Kids!

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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A History of the Census in the United States : Part 2

The 2nd Census: Census Day was August 4, 1800

John Adams was President of the United States on Census Day, August 4, 1800.

Authorizing Legislation

An act of February 28, 1800 authorized the second census of the United States, which was to include the states and territories northwest of the Ohio River and Mississippi Territory. The census was to conclude within nine calendar months of its start.

The guidelines for the 1800 enumeration followed those of the first census, with only minor alterations in the law. John Marshall, secretary of state in 1800, was the nominal head of census operations. By early 1801, however, Marshall was chief justice of the Supreme Court. James Madison, his successor as secretary of state, oversaw the final tabulations and reported population totals to Congress and the president.

Enumeration

The questionnaire provided space to separately tally free white males and females in several age categories: under 10, 10 but under 15, 16 but under 25, 25 but under 45, and over 45. Indians, slaves, and free blacks were listed in single categories undivided into age groups.

Further Information

Information provided from Census.gov

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Continuing Education: Website Accessibility

What does it mean to have an accessible website? Why is it important?

“Web accessibility means that websites, tools, and technologies are designed and developed so that people with disabilities can use them. More specifically, people can: perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with the web” – W3C

This is important to ensure equal access to information and equal ability to interact with websites and resources by eliminating barriers. For example, providing closed captioning/subtitles on videos for those who aren’t able to hear or including alternate text to describe an image helps those using screen readers.

Below are just a few introductory resources to start looking through and several webinars (upcoming and recorded) that may be useful.

close up image of computer keys with teal border

Resources:

Webinars:

  • Oct. 23rd – Introduction to Website Accessibility (Infopeople)
    • “In this one-hour webinar, you’ll gain an understanding of which guidelines are used to measure website accessibility in the United States, and how to being to evaluate your own library’s site for potential issues.”
  • Archived – NCompass Live: Pretty Sweet Tech – Building a Clean, User-Friendly Library Website (Nebraska Library Commission)
    • “Websites are often the first thing people see when interacting with a business. With so many things vying for people’s attention, the library website should be a call to action for people to use library services. This session will act as a guide to building a library website that makes a good impression on library customers.”
  • Archived – Evaluating Websites for Accessibility (Great Lakes ADA Center/ADA National Network)
    • “This introductory webinar will cover online barriers to accessibility and explain how to check that web content is accessible to all visitors”

For webinars and CE: If you would like to earn continuing education (CE) credit and are enrolled in the Nebraska Public Librarian Certification program, please submit a “CE Activity Report Form” after each webinar.

If you have any questions about continuing education, please contact Holli Duggan.

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NCompass Live: Nebraska Extension’s ‘Read for Resilience’ Program

Learn about Nebraska Extension’s ‘Read for Resilience’ Program on next week’s FREE NCompass Live webinar on Wednesday, October 23, 10:00am-11:00am CT.

Nebraska Extension’s Learning Child team is a group of early childhood Extension Educators and Specialists who provide programming, training, and professional development to young children and their caregivers. Holly Hatton-Bowers, Amy Napoli, and Linda Reddish – members of the Learning Child team – will present a brief overview on Read for Resilience. The Read for Resilience program provides children’s books and accompanying storybook guides to support young children who have been affected by natural disasters. The aim of this presentation is to discuss opportunities for collaboration with libraries, including Extension-provided displays for the books and copies of the storybook guides. Extension educators are also available to provide workshops for families to learn about children’s emotional development while children engage in fun activities and book readings.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Oct. 30 – Pretty Sweet Tech – The Power of the Internet: Use it Wisely
  • Nov. 6 – Feeding America: Gardens, Seed Exchanges, Summer Meals, and More!
  • Nov. 13 – United for Libraries – Trustees, Advocates, Friends, and Foundations: The Voice for America’s Libraries
  • Nov. 20 – VoteLibraries 2020 – Thinking About Elections and Libraries Without Being Partisan
  • Dec. 4 – Libraries and the LGBT+ Experience
  • Dec. 11 – Librarian in Training – For Kids!

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Jobs Available for the 2020 Census!

The week of October 21st is Jobs Week for the 2020 Census! Anyone can apply!

The posters below can be printed out and placed anywhere in your library!

Visit 2020 Census Jobs for more information!

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