COVID-19 and Pandemic Resources for Libraries

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

Concerned about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in your library or wondering what to tell your patrons? We’ve put together some guidance and resources for libraries.

If your library is looking for information on pandemic preparedness, including the current COVID-19 outbreak, check out our page of resources: http://nlc.nebraska.gov/libman/pandemic.aspx.

If your library is closing due to local outbreaks (or has reopened since) please let us know by filling out this form. If you need help with due dates of book club kits or ILL items due to patron illness, please contact us.

Here is a list of libraries we know are closed, have reopened, or are offering modified services: http://bit.ly/NebraskaLibraryClosuresCOVID-19. We will update this list as we hear of changes.

We have also assembled an interactive map of Nebraska libraries offering modified services during the pandemic: http://nlc.nebraska.gov/stats/covid19map.aspx.  A map of libraries offering external WiFi is here: http://nlc.nebraska.gov/stats/covid19mapwifi.aspx.

We are always updating our pages, so if you notice that we are missing a crucial resource, please reach out to us.

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Nebraska Coronavirus Relief Fund (CRF) Program

Online Program Information & Related Guidelines

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, entities across the government, businesses, and non-profit sectors continue to experience significant and unprecedented challenges to their operating capacity and sustainability. To help mitigate the impact of economic losses stemming from declining revenues, increased expenses, and employee lay offs or furloughs, the State of Nebraska has established a series of programs to help:

  1. Stabilize impacted businesses and livestock producers; and
  2. Support community institutions to meet critical needs such as food security, shelter, and mental health care;

This phase of funding will be available for select programs via online application beginning October 21, 2020:DHHS Administered Programs

DED Administered Programs

Contact Center Assistance
Beginning October 21, 2020 from 10 AM to 7 PM CT, Contact Agents will be available to address your questions about this next round of funding. A toll-free number will be released on this website at that time.

From October 22, the Contact Agents will be available Monday to Friday from 7am to 7pm CT.

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2020 Census Update: 99.98% Complete Nationwide

According to updated numbers released by the U.S. Census Bureau today, 99.98% of all housing units and addresses nationwide were accounted for in the 2020 Census as of the end of self-response and field data collection operations on Oct. 15, 2020. In all states, the District of Columbia and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, more than 99% of all addresses have been accounted for, and in all but one state that number tops 99.9%.

“The 2020 Census faced challenges like no other decennial census in living memory,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur L. Ross, Jr. “Achieving these metrics in the face of severe weather events and a global pandemic is a testament to the determination and ingenuity of the hundreds of thousands of dedicated women and men who worked on the 2020 Census.”

Compared to the final self-response rate of 66.5% for the 2010 Census, 67% were accounted for through self-response to date, with the rest having been accounted for through our Nonresponse Followup (NRFU) operation.

“America stepped up and answered the call: shape your future by responding to the 2020 Census,” said Dr. Steven Dillingham, Director of the Census Bureau. “Generally, better data comes from self-response, but after a decade of global decline in census and survey participation along with the challenges presented to communities by COVID-19, we had not expected to exceed the 2010 self-response rate. That we did is a testament to the American people, our nearly 400,000 national and community partners, and very importantly our staff.”

“The Census Bureau was able to meet and overcome many challenges because of our innovative design and use of new technology, but it could not be done without the unflinching resolve of our staff,” Dillingham continued. “We thank everyone on the team for their contributions, from the census takers and field staff going the extra mile to reach those hardest to count, to the dedicated operational leadership at headquarters and around the country working around the clock to maintain and protect our systems, process the data, oversee the operation, and get the word out about the importance of the 2020 Census.”

“We are especially proud of the hard work done to bring the state of Louisiana over 99% complete despite the devastating effects of hurricanes Laura and Delta, and of the partnership with American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments to get 99.77% of the NRFU workload on their lands done, despite closures due to the pandemic.”

“Hundreds of millions of people were counted in the 2020 Census, and statisticians and data quality experts are now busy making sure everyone was counted once, only once, and in the right place,” Dillingham continued. “The Census Bureau will use the best methodologies available to resolve the very small number of unresolved addresses and to ensure that our data products are accurate.”

Each census, the Census Bureau produces coverage estimates and conduct extensive assessments that we share with the public. The completion rates are just early indicators. For more information on the 2020 Census, including use of proxy and administrative records, please see our updated FAQs.

The Census Bureau is working hard to process the data in order to deliver complete and accurate state population counts as close as possible to the Dec. 31, 2020, statutory deadline.

Data collection for the 2020 Census ended at 11:59 p.m. Hawaii Standard Time on Oct. 15, 2020 (5:59 a.m. EDT). Paper responses are still arriving and will be processed if postmarked by October 15, and received at the processing center no later than October 22.

For more information, visit 2020census.gov.

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Friday Reads: How To Know The Birds by Ted Floyd

Birding, or bird-watching, has grown in popularity as an enjoyable activity that allows for social distancing. Birding also lets us re-center ourselves while connecting with the natural world. Of course, birding was a popular pastime even before 2020, and there are lots of books on the topic. Ted Floyd’s book, How to Know the Birds, takes a refreshing and elegant approach that will intrigue new and seasoned birders alike.

Floyd structures the book in a new way. He takes the stages of interest in birding, and lays them over the natural seasons and how those affect birds and birding, and then explores those themes by discussing one bird at a time, in a personal way. It reads much more easily than that description might lead you to believe! Each section is a bite-sized chunk that can be devoured quickly. A reader could jump around in the book, as one might with a traditional bird field guide, or read it beginning to end. This book is a good resource for the new or the experienced birder, and it would also be a great gift for the seasoned birder that thinks they’ve read all the bird books.

Floyd, Ted, and N J. Schmitt. How to Know the Birds: The Art & Adventure of Birding. , 2019. Print.

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NCompass Live: Migrating to an Open-Source ILS in an Academic Library

Learn how to celebrate successes and bounce back from problems while ‘Migrating to an Open-Source ILS in an Academic Library’ on next week’s FREE NCompass Live webinar, on Wednesday, October 21 at 10am CT.

Open source integrated library systems are becoming increasingly popular with academic institutions, a trend that is expected to continue as these systems, including Koha and Folio, mature and become widely available. Their popularity is partially attributable to the increasing costs of proprietary systems and the growing availability of affordable third-party support for those libraries that don’t have the staffing or funding to fully support an open source system. For libraries that are considering migrating to an open source product, we present two examples: the University of Montevallo, which moved from Horizon to Koha in 2018, and Colorado College, which moved from Millennium to Koha in 2020. In this session, we will discuss the preparation of data for migration, the design of the OPAC and the patron experience, the implementation of supported Koha, the process of working with staff and faculty on a major migration, and, of course, communication. By describing the ways in which this process differs across public and private institutions, this session will help librarians to understand the process of migration, the many ways in which migrations can go right, and some ideas of what to do when something inevitably goes wrong.

Presenters: Charissa Brammer, Metadata & Discovery Systems Librarian, and Cate Guenther, Digital Scholarship and Repository Librarian, Tutt Library, Colorado College.

Upcoming NCompass Live shows:

  • Oct. 28 – Pretty Sweet Tech – Computers in Libraries 2020 – Greatest Hits
  • Nov. 4 – Letters About Literature
  • Tues. Nov. 10 – Creating an Open Educational Resource: Grenzenlos Deutsch, German Language Online Curriculum
  • Nov. 18 – Summer Reading Program 2021: Tails and Tales
  • Nov. 25 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Dec. 2 – Reading Diversely
  • Dec. 9 – Esports and Evidence-Based Connected Learning

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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#BookFaceFriday “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” by Mark Twain

Does a boy get a chance to #BookFace a fence every day?

“Tom appeared on the sidewalk with a bucket of whitewash and a long-handled brush. He surveyed the fence, and all gladness left him and a deep melancholy settled down upon his spirit. Thirty yards of board fence nine feet high. Life to him seemed hollow, and existence but a burden.”

Take advantage of all the classics available on Nebraska OverDrive Libraries, like “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” by Mark Twain (Duke Classic, 2012). It’s available in eBook and audiobook format. 173 libraries across the state share this collection of 17,165 audiobooks and 28,972 eBooks. As an added bonus it includes 130 podcasts that are always available with simultaneous use (SU), as well as SU ebooks and audiobook titles that publishers have made available for a limited time.

If you’re a part of it, let your users know about this great title, and if you’re not a member yet, find more information about participating in Nebraska Overdrive Libraries!

Love this #BookFace & reading? Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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Throwback Thursday: Entrance Hall at The Elms

For this week’s #ThrowbackThursday, we’re taking a peek inside the home of Ray Julius Nye.

This 7″x7″ photograph shows the interior of the entrance hall at The Elms. Located at 1643 North Nye Avenue in Fremont, Nebraska, The Elms was home to Ray and Anna Nye. This building is now the Louise E. May Museum and home to the Dodge County Historical Society.

This image is owned by the Dodge County Historical Society and was published by Keene Memorial Library. The Library and the Historical Society, both located in Fremont, worked as partners to digitize and describe content owned by the historical society. The collection of photographs documents life in Fremont during the late 1800s and early 1900s. It features local businesses, churches, schools, and private residences.

See the materials in this collection and many more on the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in this project, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Prenda Code Club Trial

EBSCO is offering Nebraska libraries a 30-day free trial of Prenda through the Nebraska Library Commission.

Description: Prenda is a fully self-paced coding product for librarians to use with students for clubs before school or after school. It currently offers 13+ coding languages for website development, gaming, back-end scripting, and curriculum for both robotics and maker devices. It has a robust administrative dashboard for user statistics which allows for things like password resets and unique messaging.

Prenda Code Club features include:

  • Coding tutorials and activities to teach coding concepts
  • Coding portfolio projects where coders build real websites, video games, apps, animations, and programs
  • The coding languages, platforms, and devices included are Scratch, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Python, Sphero, Ozobot, Rasberry Pi, and Makey Makey
  • Unlimited users, unlimited access
  • Gamified learning experience
  • Robust and easy to use reporting
  • Training and support to run virtual library code clubs.

To learn more about Prenda Code Club, visit their online product page or view the Prenda Code Club Software Demo

Trial Dates: The trial began on October 8, 2020 and will run for 30 days.

Trial access instructions: The trial URL, username, and password were distributed via an October 8, 2020 message to the TRIAL mailing list. Nebraska librarians who didn’t receive this information or would like to have it sent to them again can email Susan Knisely.

Note: If you are a Nebraska librarian and you’d like to receive future database trial announcements directly in your email inbox, please make sure you are signed up for the Nebraska Library Commission’s TRIAL mailing list.

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#BookFaceFriday “The Leopard” by Jo Nesbø

It’s a cat and mouse game in this week’s #BookFaceFriday!

The eighth Harry Hole novel in the Nordic mystery series, this #BookFace title is a part of our Book Club Kits. This service allows libraries to “check out” multiple copies of a book. Check out “The Leopard: A Harry Hole Novel” by Jo Nesbø (Knopf, 2011). NLC has seven of Nesbø’s novels in our book club kit collection.

“In The Leopard, Nesbø deploys all the key ingredients of a cracking good thriller with expertise and verve. The ticking clock, the tension expertly ratcheted ever upwards, the changing scenery, the constantly shifting goalposts, and his effortless, triumphant outpacing of the reader’s ability to guess what’s going to happen will keep you gripped to the last page.” The Guardian (U.K.)

Book Club Kits Rules for Use

  1. These kits can be checked out by the librarians of Nebraska libraries and media centers.
  2. Circulation times are flexible and will be based upon availability. There is no standard check-out time for book club kits.
  3. Please search the collection to select items you wish to borrow and use the REQUEST THIS KIT icon to borrow items.
  4. Contact the Information Desk at the Library Commission if you have any questions: by phone: 800/307-2665, or by email: Information Services Team

This week’s BookFace model isn’t exactly a staff member, but Kelly is our Library Development Director Christa Porter’s cat! She and her fellow kitty brethren, Logan, Luna, and Nushi, make purrfect bookface models. Just for fun, we decided to share their cute kitty faces, sans books.

Love this #BookFace & reading? Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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Friday Reads: Break Shot: My First 21 Years by James Taylor

More accurately described – Friday listens, this title is available exclusively from Audible.com. Break Shot was recorded by James in his home studio, TheBarn in western Massachusetts and released in conjunction with his 19th studio album, American Standard. At only an hour and a half, I listened twice, enjoying it even more the second time. It begins with the following: “I’m James Taylor and I’m a professional autobiographer. I usually talk about myself with a guitar in my hand and I have one now.” James explains that the title is an analogy for his tight knit family that eventually split apart “like a break shot in the game of pool … when you slam the cue ball into the fifteen other balls and they all go flying off.”  James and his four siblings were raised with great privilege in North Carolina in the ‘60’s but the family fell apart. Three of the four kids ended up in psychiatric hospitals.  Drug and alcohol addiction took their toll.

Despite coming from a family of doctors and lawyers, James wasn’t interested in college. His parents supported his decision to spend tuition money on a flight to London. This trip provided the pivotal moment of his life. Through life-long friend Danny Kortchmar, James met with Peter Asher, the head of A&R (Artist & Repertoire) at Apple Records and played his demo tape.  Peter liked what he heard and recalls calling out,  “is there a Beatle in the house?”  James auditioned for Paul McCartney and George Harrison with the song Something in the Way She Moves. James’ first album James Taylor, was the first recording by a non-British artist released by Apple Records in 1968.

Break Shot didn’t provide a great deal of revelatory information, so much of James’ life is in his lyrics, but the storytelling intertwined with the recorded songs provided an experience you can’t have with a printed book. This audio memoir was for me, a private concert. This recording is part of a new series, Words+Music, Audible’s musical storytelling initiative. With other exclusive music biographies by Tom Morello, Common, St. Vincent, Sheryl Crow, and T Bone Burnett, I hope other audio publishers will begin providing similar recordings.

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Throwback Thursday: Theodore Roosevelt visiting Nebraska

We’re back with another #ThrowbackThursday!

This postcard from 1912 shows a large crowd gathered at the train station in Holdrege, Nebraska. Theodore Roosevelt stands on the platform at the back of the train waving to the people.

This image is owned by the Phelps County Historical Society and published by the Holdrege Area Public Library. In partnership, they digitized a collection of images portraying the history of Phelps County starting in the mid 1880s.

If you are someone who likes history, especially history related to Nebraska, check out the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in this project, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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NCompass Live: Finding Grants for Libraries in Unexpected Places

We’ll be ‘Finding Grants for Libraries in Unexpected Places’ on next week’s FREE NCompass Live webinar, on Wednesday, October 7 at 10am CT.

Budgets allocated to public libraries are sometimes not enough to provide the services, materials, and engaging programming that library staff want to provide. Luckily, there are other funding opportunities available, if you just know where to look. You may know about many library specific grants, but libraries are also eligible for other grants that might not be so obvious. In this session, we will learn to think outside the box to find grants for your library.

Presenter: Christa Porter, Library Development Director, Nebraska Library Commission.

Upcoming NCompass Live shows:

  • Oct. 21 – Migrating to an Open-Source ILS in an Academic Library: How to Celebrate Successes and Bounce Back from Problems
  • Oct. 28 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Tues. Nov. 10 – Creating an Open Educational Resource: Grenzenlos Deutsch, German Language Online Curriculum

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: Nobody Will Tell You This But Me: A true (as told to me) story by Bess Kalb

I listened to this audiobook from Lincoln City Libraries through my Libby App. Narrated by the author, it’s a short 4 hours, the perfect listen for a road trip. I looked up Bess Kalb’s book after reading the following statement “Last year at a party a writer I respect called my pregnant stomach a ‘career-ender’ and now I’m the head writer of a show I sold to a major network and yesterday I signed the deal paying me to write a movie based on the book I finished 5 weeks postpartum, so do you like apples?” and I thought… yes, this is a woman whose book I’d like to read.

Some relationships are meant to be memorialized, the voices of our loved ones with us even after they’re gone. Such is the memoir of Bess Kalb and her maternal grandmother “Grandma Bobby.” Kalb recounts three generations of family history, mostly focused on the women, in a succinct and heartwarming account. The author doesn’t gloss over the true-to-life relationships of her family but displays them in all their messy glory. The result is a series of recounted conversations, family tales, and verbatim voicemail messages left by her grandmother. Kalb saved every one her Grandma Bobby ever left her.  I admit, I laughed and cried as these people, flaws and all, came to life. Relationships and family especially can be messy, filled with misunderstanding, pride, and rough edges that rub, but through all of this, the spunky voice of Grandma Bobby is clear, that and her love for her granddaughter.

Kalb, Bess. Nobody Will Tell You This But Me: A true (as told to me) story. Penguin Random House Audio. 2020.

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#BookFaceFriday – “Lessons in Censorship” by Catherine J. Ross

This week’s #BookFaceFriday won’t be silenced!

At the Nebraska Library Commission we love Banned Books Week and the spotlight it puts on censorship. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types — in shared support of the freedom to read. We love the idea that there are no forbidden books! An especially pertinent title in our Library Science collection is “Lessons in Censorship: How Schools and Courts Subvert Students’ First Amendment Rights” by Catherine J. Ross (Harvard University Press; Illustrated Edition, 2015.) Our Library Science Collection provides professional and reference materials for Nebraska librarians and library science programs. This includes all librarians and library science students. The checkout period is 4 weeks, and items can be sent through the mail or picked up in person.

“An extraordinary book. Ross offers the best account I have read about why we have free speech and why we value it so much―insightful and accessible. Beyond explaining what students can say, and how they can say it, and how limits have developed over the last ninety years, Lessons in Censorship powerfully argues that speech rights in public school are essential to the health of democratic governance―every concerned citizen must read this book.”Gene Policinski, author of the weekly column Inside the First Amendment

This week’s #BookFace model is Holly Atterbury, one of our Talking Book & Braille Service Library Readers Advisors.

Love this #BookFace & reading? Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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Throwback Thursday: Ben Reifel Playing a Courting Flute

It’s another #ThrowbackThursday from Nebraska Memories!

This image from the 1920s shows Ben Reifel sitting in a field, playing a courting flute at the Rosebud Reservation.

Ben Reifel was a Congressman in the United States House of Representatives. He also used to work as a clerk in John Anderson’s store.

This black and white photograph was created by J. A. Anderson and is published by History Nebraska. John Alvin Anderson was born in Sweden in 1869. He came to Nebraska with his parents and settled in Cherry County. He worked as a civilian photographer for the army at Fort Niobrara and later worked as a clerk at the Rosebud Reservation trading post in South Dakota.

Are you a history buff? If so, check out the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in this project, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Shortlist for 2021 One Book One Nebraska Announced

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
September 30, 2020

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Tessa Terry
402-471-3434
800-307-2665

Shortlist for 2021 One Book One Nebraska Announced

What book will all Nebraskans be encouraged to read in 2021? We will all find out on October 23rd. A Nebraska biography, Midwest nonfiction, a book of essays —all stories with ties to Nebraska and the Great Plains—are the finalists for the 2021 One Book One Nebraska statewide reading program. The finalists are:

  • The Nature of Home: A Lexicon and Essays by Lisa Knopp, Bison Books (2004)
  • Black Print with a White Carnation: Mildred Brown and the Omaha Star Newspaper, 1938-1989 by Amy Helene Forss, University of Nebraska Press (2014)
  • The Loren Eiseley Reader by Loren Eiseley, The Loren Eiseley Society (2009)
  • Prairie Forge: The Extraordinary Story of the Nebraska Scrap Metal Drive of World War II by James J. Kimble, Bison Books (2014)

The One Book One Nebraska reading program, now in its sixteenth year, is sponsored by the Nebraska Center for the Book, Humanities Nebraska, and Nebraska Library Commission. It encourages Nebraskans across the state to read and discuss the same book, chosen from books written by Nebraska authors or that have a Nebraska theme or setting. A Nebraska Center for the Book committee selected the four finalists from a list of twenty-four titles nominated by Nebraskans. In the coming weeks, Nebraska Center for the Book board members will vote on the 2021 selection.

Nebraskans are invited to take part in the virtual Celebration of Nebraska Books during the week of October 19th-23rd, where the choice for the 2021 One Book One Nebraska will be announced at noon on the final day. This year’s One Book One Nebraska selection, All the Gallant Men (William Morrow, 2016) by Donald Stratton with Ken Gire will be featured in a keynote presentation by the Nebraska Center for the Book Board Member Rebecca Faber. See http://onebook.nebraska.gov or https://www.facebook.com/OneBookOneNebraska for more information about ongoing 2020 One Book One Nebraska activities.

The week-long virtual Celebration of Nebraska Books will include acceptance messages and readings by the winners of the 2020 Nebraska Book Awards emceed by Nebraska State Poet Matt Mason. A list of Nebraska Book Award winners is posted at http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/awards.html. The Celebration of Nebraska Books is sponsored by the Nebraska Center for the Book and Nebraska Library Commission with support from History Nebraska’s Nebraska History Museum. Humanities Nebraska provides support for the One Book One Nebraska keynote presentation.

The Nebraska Center for the Book is housed at the Nebraska Library Commission and brings together the state’s readers, writers, booksellers, librarians, publishers, printers, educators, and scholars to build the community of the book, supporting programs to celebrate and stimulate public interest in books, reading, and the written word. The Nebraska Center for the Book is supported by the national Center for the Book in the Library of Congress and the Nebraska Library Commission.

As the state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services, “bringing together people and information.”

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.    

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Flash CE Grant!

We are opening applications for just one week to cover registration costs to attend the Iowa Library Association’s virtual conference on October 15th!

ILA has extended a special $50 registration rate for Nebraska Library Association (NLA) members. Non-members can register for $80 or Trustees for only $20.

More information about the conference can be found at the links below:

CE Grant Details:

  • The applicant must be either 1) employed in an accredited Nebraska public library or a state-run institutional library at the time of application, or 2) a current board member of an accredited Nebraska public library. You do not need to be a member of NLA to apply.
  • These are for individuals only (no group applications).
  • Applications are due by 11:59 pm (CST) on Wednesday, October 7th.
  • You will also need to submit a separate indication of support form.
  • Applicants will be notified on Thursday, October 8th.
  • You must register for the conference by Monday, October 12th.

Apply Now!

Note: This mini-round of CE grants is separate from our 2021 Continuing Education grants which will be available for applications starting on Monday, October 5th and will be open for online learning, other out-of-state conferences, and larger CE projects. For more information on those grant opportunities, please see our main CE Grants Information page.

If you have any questions, please contact Holli Duggan.

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#BookFaceFriday – “No Truth Without Ruth”

Dissent is patriotic, and so is this #BookFaceFriday.

In honor of the notorious R.B.G. we wanted to highlight this throwback #BookFace. May your storytimes be filled with heroes that inspire us as much as Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Check out “No Truth Without Ruth: The Life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg” written by Kathleen Krull and illustrated by Nancy Zhang (Quill Tree Books, 2018.) This title comes from our large collection of children’s and young adult books sent to us as review copies from book publishers. When our Children and Young Adult Library Services Coordinator, Sally Snyder, is done with them, the review copies are available for the Library System Directors to distribute to school and public libraries in their systems. Public and school library staff are also welcome to stop by and select some titles for their library collections. We think this one would be a great addition to any library. Contact Sally Snyder for more information.

“Large, colorful illustrations complement and highlight the text. Zhang captures the look and style of each era in Ginsburg’s life. Employing a strongly admiring tone and accessible language, the author emphasizes Ginsburg’s struggles, strengths, and triumphs. Informative, well-told biography.” (Kirkus Reviews)

More R.B.G. Children’s Books:

  • A Is for Awesome: 23 Iconic Women Who Changed the World, by Eva Chen
  • I Look Up to Ruth Bader Ginsburg, by Anna Membrino
  • My Little Golden Book About Ruth Bader Ginsburg, by Shana Corey
  • When Ruth Bader Ginsburg Chewed 100 Sticks of Gum, by Mark Andrew Weakland
  • Ruth Bader Ginsburg: The Case of R.B.G. vs. Inequality, by Jonah Winter
  • I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark, by Debbie Levy
  • Who Is Ruth Bader Ginsburg, by Patricia Brennan Demuth
  • Notorious RBG: The Life & Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Young Readers Edition, by Irin Carmon & Shana Knizhnick

This week’s #BookFace model is Mary Geibel, our Information Services Technician!

Love this #BookFace & reading? We suggest checking out all the titles available in our Book Club collection, permanent collection, and Nebraska OverDrive Libraries. Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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NCompass Live: Pretty Sweet Tech – Revamping Your WordPress Website

We’ll be ‘Revamping Your WordPress Website’ on next week’s Pretty Sweet Tech FREE NCompass Live webinar, on Wednesday, September 30 at 10am CT.

There have been quite a few changes to WordPress, especially in the past year. Since the start of the pandemic, there has also been a growing need for online resources and activities. Now that people have had a taste for these online resources, the need for quality online material is growing. Your library can help!

This webinar will act as a guide to help you refresh your library’s WordPress website. Here’s what we will cover:

  • What is WordPress and what changed?
  • What should I put on my website?
  • How can I learn new WordPress skills?
  • Turning a planning page into a website.

You will walk away with a step-by-step quick-start guide for getting your website up and running. Remember, it doesn’t have to be perfect as you’re just getting started. You can add more as you learn more. If you’re in Nebraska, feel free to email me at amanda.sweet@nebraska.gov for a planning consultation and/or WordPress walk-through.

Special monthly episodes of NCompass Live! Join the NLC’s Technology Innovation Librarian, Amanda Sweet, as she guides us through the world of library-related Pretty Sweet Tech.

Upcoming NCompass Live shows:

  • Oct. 21 – Migrating to an Open-Source ILS in an Academic Library: How to Celebrate Successes and Bounce Back from Problems
  • Tues. Nov. 10 – Creating an Open Educational Resource: Grenzenlos Deutsch, German Language Online Curriculum

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: The Dutch House by Ann Patchett

Ann Patchett’s Bel Canto was the first book that I read of this author’s many books. At the time, it was Lincoln City Libraries’ selection for its One Book – One Lincoln community reading project. That book led to reading several other of Patchett’s novels and memoirs. The Dutch House is Patchett’s eighth novel and shares characteristics of her previous books. Common are interesting settings, shifting timelines, well-drawn characters, blended families, and complicated relationships. Notable are Patchett’s skilled writing, wit, and imaginative stories. Dutch House (a mansion near Philadelphia) is both background and central to the story.

Somewhat akin to a fairy tale, Danny and Maeve Conroy, brother and sister, are the central characters (Hansel and Gretel?). There are the experiences of abandonment, banishment, the evil stepmother, and not-at-all evil stepsisters. Danny is the book’s first-person narrator. Danny’s and Maeve’s closeness over five decades evolves from their early childhood loss of mother and father. Interesting to me was the dialogue. Though, dialogue was especially notable because I listened to the audiobook narrated by Tom Hanks, perhaps more accurately described as performed by Hanks.

Patchett, Ann. The Dutch House. HarperCollins. 2019.

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Throwback Thursday: Crawford Fire Department 1910

Happy #ThrowbackThursday!

Check out this group photo of the 1910-1911 Crawford Fire Department. This 5″x8″ black and white photograph is owned by the Crawford Historical Society and Museum. In partnership with the Crawford Public Library, the Crawford Historical Society and Museum digitized a number of images in the Crawford area in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

If you’re someone who likes history, especially Nebraska history, check out the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in this project, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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