NCompass Live: Technology Classes at Your Library

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Join us for next week’s NCompass Live, ‘Technology Classes at Your Library’, on Wednesday, Dec. 7, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

In the past three years, the Iowa City Public Library has tripled their patron involvement in technology classes taught by library staff, without increasing staff or budget. Technology is an ever changing landscape and classes are a great way to help patrons become savvier technology users. Learn how to grow interest in your library’s technology courses with strategies for assessment, marketing, and curriculum development.

Presenter: Jen Eilers, Library Assistant, Iowa City Public Library. Jen organizes and coordinates a team of librarians who teach 4-5 classes a month to adult learners. The classes focus on technology and information literacy skills for the Iowa City Community. She also staffs the information desk and problem solves various patron technology issues through the library’s drop-in tech zone.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Dec. 14 – Best New Children’s Books of 2016
  • Dec. 21 – Under the Microscope: Science at the Library
  • Dec. 28 – Best New Teen Books of 2016
  • Jan. 4, 2017 – Begin With Books: An Early Literacy Partnership

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: Lives of the Monster Dogs by Kirsten Bakis

livesmonsterdogsA Prussian mad scientist relocates to rural Canada, where he uses his mad science skills to create “monster dogs”. The dogs’ intelligence is boosted.  Instead of paws, they have prosthetic hands on their forelegs, and implanted voice boxes allow the dogs to speak.   They can also walk upright, although some need to use canes for support.  Despite these enhancements, the dogs are treated as virtual slaves in their isolated town—so isolated that it retains the scientist’s 19th-century Prussian culture—until the beasts finally revolt.  In 2008, the monster dogs arrive in Manhattan, wearing top hats and white ties.  Their new city welcomes them and things finally seem to be looking up for the dogs, but a new threat could endanger their entire existence.

If this synopsis sounds appealing, you should probably read this book.  The imaginative premise is definitely the best thing about it.  The blend of walking, talking dogs and their old-fashioned Germanic manners is very compelling, and at times this novel has an almost steampunk-like feel.  The author skillfully merges the fantastic and the antique, especially in elements like the dogs’ opera libretto, which tells the story of their Canadian uprising.

But there are a few slip-ups.  Some of the narration is handled by Cleo Pira, a young writer whom the dogs befriend.  Cleo is not an especially interesting character and her adoption by these fascinating dogs seems kind of Twilighty.  Sometimes she talks a lot about clothes instead of the talking, walking dogs that wear them.  Additionally, some of the plotting is overly loose and the ending seems a bit abrupt and unsatisfying.

But, for me, the monster dogs made up for it.  It’s a very audacious idea for a story and, even if everything doesn’t gel perfectly, this is certainly a memorable read.   This book was published almost twenty years ago and it is, to date, the author’s only novel.   It seems to have gone unnoticed, so here’s hoping that it eventually finds an audience that can appreciate its charms.

Bakis, K. (1997). Lives of the monster dogs: A novel. New York: Warner Books.

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What’s Up Doc? New Nebraska State Agency Publications Received at the Library Commission

Nebraska-150-logoNew Nebraska state agency publications have been received at the Nebraska Library Commission for November 2016.  Included are titles from the Nebraska Department of Agriculture, the Nebraska Department of Insurance, the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources, the Nebraska Secretary of State Elections Division, and the University of Nebraska Press, to name a few.

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Throwback Thursday: Hanscom Park

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Postcard of Flower Gardens, Hanscom Park, Omaha, Nebraska.  Approximate date early 1900’s.

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The Public Library Survey is now available on Bibliostat

SurveyThe annual IMLS public library survey (submitted via Bibliostat) is now available. The survey deadline is February 17, 2017. Completion of the survey is required for your library to receive state aid if you are accredited. If you aren’t accredited, you still have an incentive to complete the survey ($200), called Dollar$ for Data.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions throughout the process. You can always start the survey, save your submissions, and then resume at a later date. It doesn’t have to all be done at once. Tip: It’s always a good idea to click on the red “save” button in Bibliostat before clicking “next” to the next screen. Thank you in advance for your participation.

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Free Class! From A(norexia) to Z(its): Providing Health Information to Teens

National Library of Medicine (NLM) LogoThursday, December 8, 2016, 10-11 am CT (1 hour webinar on Dec. 8th with class continuing online via Moodle)

Registration is required: https://nnlm.gov/ntc/classes/class_details.html?class_id=503

This class is designed for public, elementary and secondary school library staff, teachers, nurses, and counselors. The hands-on class will present an overview of health information needs of teenagers and their information seeking behaviors; review communication skills needed during reference interviews with teenagers; and explore credible health information resources that are designed for teens. This course is approved for 3 MLA CE credits and qualifies for the MLA Consumer Health Information Specialization certificate. Attendees must complete both the webinar and the Moodle portion of the class to receive the CEs.

Interested in pursuing the Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) certificate? This certification is open to all librarians. Classes are free, and there is a fee to apply for the certificate. The NN/LM MidContinental Region does provide funding to cover the certificate application fee. For more information, visit: https://nnlm.gov/chisfund

Christian Minter, MLIS

Nebraska Outreach/Education Coordinator

National Network of Libraries of Medicine | MidContinental Region

McGoogan Library of Medicine | 986705 Nebraska Medical Center | Omaha, NE 68198-6705

402-559-7226 | christian.minter@unmc.eduhttp://nnlm.gov/mcr

 

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NCompass Live: Reader of the Week

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Join us for next week’s NCompass Live, ‘Reader of the Week’, on Wednesday, Nov. 30, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

The session will describe the Morton-James Public Library’s Reader of the Week initiative, begun in January 2016. Partnering with their local newspaper, library staff provided content for a weekly feature touted “Reader of the Week.” The column included readers talking about what they read and why. The session will include commentary on how this feature has transformed their conversations with library users from mere transactions to engaged descriptions of what people are reading, and want to read.

Presenter: Denise Davis, Reference Librarian, Morton-James Public Library, Nebraska City, NE.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Dec. 7 – Technology Classes at Your Library
  • Dec. 14 – Best New Children’s Books of 2016
  • Dec. 21 – Under the Microscope: Science at the Library
  • Dec. 28 – Best New Teen Books of 2016
  • Jan. 4, 2017 – Begin With Books: An Early Literacy Partnership

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: The Tenth Man: A Novel, by Graham Greene

22944771One advantage I have had over the years with the Nebraska Library Commission is that of being able to visit libraries all over the state – primarily public libraries, but a few other types as well. Often the public libraries have ongoing book sales of both weeded and donated books, usually on a shelf or sale table with suggested prices for paperback, hardbacks, or magazines, sometimes with statements such as, “Donation accepted.” On one fairly recent swing through the western part of the state to do a strategic planning workshop, I paused briefly at a book sale and purchased The Tenth Man, a short novel by Graham Greene.

Of course it was the author’s name that intrigued me, and the recollection of a film based on one of his novels, The Third Man, that caught my attention since I had never heard of a book by him entitled, The Tenth Man (and since the title so closely resembled the more well-known one). A summary of the novel itself is fairly easy and straightforward. The setting is a German prison camp during the World War II era in which political prisoners are forced to draw lots to determine which of every ten men will be executed – a “decimation” order that is apparently similar to what happened in Spain during its Fascist years.

This short novel (about 30,000 words) moves quickly, with the action and dialog quite spare, yet effective. The primary story concerns that of a wealthy attorney who is among the prisoners and who draws one of the marked papers indicating he will be executed (following orders of the prison masters who allow the prisoners themselves to determine who will be sacrificed). The crux of the story is that the attorney desperately offers all his wealth, his home and his land to any other prisoner who will take his place and be executed. He has a taker, and, being an attorney, knows how to put the proper papers together to bring this about to make the destitute man temporarily rich, at least until his death, with his family provided for.

The substitute is executed, and later, after the war has ended, the attorney returns to his former home, passing himself off with a different name and identify. He is, of course, penniless, but he is befriended by the executed prisoner’s sister and her crotchety mother, and is given caretaker-type work there since the family is in a somewhat precarious position. Yet another imposter – as it turns out, an unemployed actor — shows up, claiming to be the surviving attorney and ingratiating himself to the sister.

The story is fairly sparse, as I mentioned, but very well-written. What was most interesting to me, however, was not so much the novel itself, but more how it came about. According to the author, he wrote this novella sometime in 1944, based on an idea he had had in 1937. In 1983 Greene was contacted by an agent in America, telling him that The Tenth Man was being offered by the movie giant MGM for sale to an American publisher. Graham’s memory of the novel was so vague, that he thought he remembered writing a two-page summary of the story idea, not the 30,000 words it turned out to be. Apparently Greene had sold the rights to the novella to MGM under what he deemed a “slave contract” to ensure security for his family’s income.

Graham Greene himself worked for MI6, England’s spy agency. His travels for the agency took him all over the world, and he used many of the settings from his travels in his novels. The Tenth Man is not considered among Greene’s greatest work, but this author’s prolific career of writing novels, short stories, travel books, essays, plays and screen plays bears looking into. The Tenth Man is my introduction to an author I always meant to, but never had read, before this.

 

 

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Throwback Thursday: Frankfort Square

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Postcard of Frankfort Square, Columbus, Nebraska.  Approximate date early 1900’s.

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Call for Speakers for the 2017 Big Talk From Small Libraries online conference

The Call for Speakers for Big Talk From Small Libraries 2017 is now open! This free one-day online conference is aimed at librarians from small libraries; the smaller the better. Small libraries of all types – public, academic, school, museum, special, etc. – are encouraged to submit a proposal.

Do you offer a service or program at your small library that other librarians might like to hear about? Have you implemented a new (or old) technology, hosted an event, partnered with others in your community, or just done something really cool? The Big Talk From Small Libraries online conference gives you the opportunity to share what you’ve done, while learning what your colleagues in other small libraries are doing. Here are some possible topics to get you thinking:

  • Unique Libraries
  • Special Collections
  • New buildings
  • Fundraising
  • Improved Workflows
  • Staff Development
  • Advocacy Efforts
  • Community Partnerships
  • That great thing you’re doing at your library!

For Big Talk From Small Libraries 2017, we’re looking for seven 50-minute presentations 7and five 10-minute “lightning round” presentations.

Big Talk From Small Libraries 2017 will be held on Friday, February 24, 2017 between 8:45 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. (CT) via the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Speakers will be able to present their programs from their own desktops. The schedule will accommodate speakers’ time-zones.

If you are interested in presenting, please submit your proposal by Friday, January 13, 2017. Speakers from libraries serving fewer than 10,000 people will be preferred, but presentations from libraries with larger service populations will be considered.

Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training, Grants, Information Resources, Library Management, Preservation, Programming, Public Relations, Technology, Youth Services | Leave a comment

Nebraska Library Commission Announces Public Library Accreditation

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:NLC Logo
November 22, 2016

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Richard Miller
402-471-3175
800-307-2665

Nebraska Library Commission Announces Public Library Accreditation

Nebraska Library Commission Library Development Director Richard Miller recently announced the accreditation of public libraries across Nebraska. Miller stated, “We are dedicated to helping Nebraska libraries meet Nebraskans’ information needs, opening up the world of information for citizens of all ages. The Library Commission continues to work in partnership with Nebraska libraries and the regional library systems, using the Public Library Accreditation program to help public libraries grow and develop.”

Public libraries in Nebraska are accredited for a three-year period, from October 1 of the first year, through September 30 of the third year. To learn more about this process and to see a complete list of all accredited Nebraska libraries on the Nebraska Library Commission, go to http://nlc.nebraska.gov/LibAccred/Standings.asp.

The Nebraska Library Commission congratulates the public libraries listed below as they move forward toward the realization of this vision for the future: “All Nebraskans will have improved access to enhanced library and information services, provided and facilitated by qualified library personnel, boards, and supporters with the knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes necessary to provide excellent library and information services.”

Nebraska Public Libraries Accredited through September 30, 2019

Alliance Public Library
Ashland Public Library
Atkinson Public Library
Rock County Public Library (Bassett)
Lied Battle Creek Public Library
Beaver City Public Library
Bellevue Public Library
Dundy County Library (Benkelman)
Blair Public Library
Bloomfield Public Library
Blue Hill Public Library
Bridgeport Public Library
Butler Memorial Library (Cambridge)
Cedar Rapids Public Library
Ceresco Community Library
Chadron Public Library
Chappell Memorial Library & Art Gallery
Creighton Public Library
Hruska Memorial Library (David City)
Jennifer Reinke Public Library (Deshler)
John Rogers Memorial Library (Dodge)
Elgin Public Library
Elwood Public Library
Fairmont Public Library
Fall City Library & Arts Center
Franklin Public Library
Gilbert Public Library (Friend)
Fullerton Public Library
Gering Public Library
Gordon City Library
Gretna Public Library
Hemingford Public Library
Bruun Memorial Library (Humboldt)
Grant County Library (Hyannis)
La Vista Public Library
Laurel Community Learning Center
Leigh Public Library
Lexington Public Library
Nancy Fawcett Memorial Library (Lodgepole)
Lyman Public Library
McCook Public Library
Mead Public Library
Meadow Grove Public Library
Webermeier Memorial Library (Milford)
Neligh Public Library
Nelson Public Library
North Bend Public Library
Lois Johnson Memorial Library (Oakdale)
Omaha Public Library
Orchard Public Library
Ord Township Library
Cordelia B Preston Memorial Library (Orleans)
Osceola Public Library
Osmond Public Library
Oxford Public Library
Paxton Public Library
House Memorial Library (Pender)
Lied Pierce Public Library
Plattsmouth Public Library
Baright Public Library (Ralston)
Ravenna Public Library
Seward Memorial Library
Shelby Community Library
Sidney Public Library
Stanton Public Library
Sutton Memorial Library
Lied Tekamah Public Library
Trenton Public Library
Ulysses Township Library
Valley Public Library
Valparaiso Public Library
Agnes Robinson Waterloo Public Library
Wauneta Public Library
Lied Lincoln Township Library (Wausa)
Wayne Public Library
Wisner Public Library
Wymore Public Library
Kilgore Memorial Library (York)

As the state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services, “bringing together people and information.”

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.

 

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Registration Now Open for Spring Library and Information Services Online Classes

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Online Course Offerings
Spring 2017
January 9, 2017 – May 4, 2017

Registration for Spring Semester opens Nov. 16, 2016

 LIBR 2150 Managing Collections in Libraries and Information Agencies
Patty Birch, Instructor
This course will provide students with an understanding of managing collections in libraries and information agencies, including: 

  • Basics of Collection Management (terminology, models)
  • 21st Century Literacies
  • Selection (All resources, for all age levels)
  • Acquisition and Deselection/Weeding
  • Intellectual Freedom
  • Copyright

Suggested prerequisite: LIBR 1010 Foundations of Library & Information Services.
For information regarding course content, contact the instructor at
pbirch@cccneb.edu


LIBR 2210 Cataloging and Classification
Ruth Carlock, Instructor
This course will include theories, concepts and activities for cataloging and classifying materials in the 21st Century.  It includes the following topics:

  • The bibliographic record
  • Sears and Library of Congress subject headings
  • Dewey Decimal and Library of Congress classification systems
  • The MARC record
  • Resource Description and Access Instructions

Suggested prerequisite: LIBR 1010 Foundations of Library & Information Services
For information regarding this course, contact the instructor at
rcarlock@cccneb.edu

 

LIBR 2940 Library and Information Services Capstone Practicum
Erica Rose, Instructor
This capstone course is the last course in the Library & Information Services program. Students will complete 40 hours of service learning in a host library. The course also includes a review of the principle pieces of learning from the LIS program.

Prerequisites:  LIBR 1010, 2100, 2150, 2210, & 2250
For information regarding this course, contact the instructor at
erose@cccneb.edu

 

 

For information concerning Admissions or Registration, contact: Dee Johnson, djohnson@cccneb.edu, 402-562-1418 or Toll Free at 877-222-0780 ext. 1418

 

 

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Join the Nebraska Dewey Group Purchase

This is a good time of year to remind Nebraska librarians that they can save money on the web and print versions of the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) system by participating in the Nebraska Dewey Group Purchase!

Dewey on the Web

Enjoy web-based access to an enhanced version of the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) database through WebDewey. WebDewey includes all content from the print edition and features:

  • deweywebregular updates (new developments, new built numbers and additional electronic index terms)
  • an easy-to-navigate, simple user interface that is suitable for the novice as well as the power user
  • BISAC-to-DDC mappings

Our next WebDewey Group annual subscription term will begin on January 1, 2017 and run through December 31, 2017. Libraries may join the Group at any time. Mid-term subscriptions will be prorated. Orders must be received by the 15th of the month for a start date of the 1st of the following month.

If your library is interested in subscribing to WebDewey, you will find Pricing information on the online WebDewey Order Form.

To see WebDewey in action, try the WebDewey 2.0: An Overview tutorial.

Dewey in Print

The Nebraska Dewey Group includes the print versions of the Abridged Edition 15 (1 volume) and the 23rd edition of the unabridged Dewey Decimal Classification (4 volumes).

dewey_23OCLC is offering group participants 10% off of the original list price on the DDC in print.

If your library is interested in ordering the DDC in print, you will find pricing information on the online Book Order Form.

For more information about the DDC, please visit Dewey Services.

If you have any questions about these Dewey products or the Nebraska Group, please contact Susan Knisely, 402-471-3849 or 800-307-2665.

NOTE: OCLC Membership is NOT required to purchase Dewey products.

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NCompass Live: A Librarian Walks Into a Bar….

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Join us for next week’s NCompass Live, ‘A Librarian Walks Into a Bar….’, on Wednesday, Nov. 23, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

One of the places that the fabled Millennials gather is the local watering hole. One of the best ways to engage with them and promote the library is to go there and do stuff with them. The Hastings Public Library has been doing a monthly Pub Quiz since 2010. It not only outperforms all adult programming in the library, but it also allows people to see librarians and library materials in a whole new context.

Presenter: Jake Rundle, Collections Librarian, Hastings (NE) Public Library.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Nov. 30 – Reader of the Week
  • Dec. 7 – Technology Classes at Your Library
  • Dec. 14 – Best New Children’s Books of 2016
  • Dec. 21 – Under the Microscope: Science at the Library
  • Dec. 28 – Best New Teen Books of 2016

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: American Gods, by Neil Gaiman

american_godsAmerican Gods, by Neil Gaiman, is one of those books that my husband has always  insisted I read, but that I’ve put off reading until now.  Why am I reading it now?  Because the TV show, starring Gillian Anderson and Ian McShane (among others), is set to debut in 2017, and I wanted to know the story before I watch the show.

American Gods is the story of Shadow Moon.  Sentenced to three years in prison for robbery, Shadow did his time, quietly waiting for the magic day when he could return to Eagle Point, Indiana. All he wanted was to be with Laura, the wife he deeply loved, and start a new life. But just days before his release, Laura and Shadow’s best friend are killed in an accident. With his life in pieces and nothing to keep him tethered, Shadow accepts a job from a beguiling stranger he meets on the way home, an enigmatic man who calls himself Mr. Wednesday. A trickster and rogue, Wednesday seems to know more about Shadow than Shadow does himself.

Life as Wednesday’s bodyguard, driver, and errand boy is far more interesting and dangerous than Shadow ever imagined. It is a job that takes him on a dark and bizarre road trip and introduces him to a host of weird characters whose fates are somehow mysteriously intertwined with his own.

Along the way, Shadow will learn that the past never dies; that everyone, including his beloved Laura, harbors secrets; and that dreams, totems, legends, and myths are more real than we know. Ultimately, he will discover that beneath the placid surface of everyday life, a storm is brewing,  and that he is standing squarely in its path.

I listened to the 10th Anniversary full-cast audio version of American Gods, and was completely drawn in from the very beginning of the author’s introduction.  Neil Gaiman actually traveled the United States while writing this story, so that he could accurately describe Shadow’s road trip on paper.  Gaiman’s masterful descriptions and the actor’s performances brought this story completely to life, and I highly recommend both the book and the audio version.

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Throwback Thursday: Platte River Wagon Bridge

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Postcard of Platte River Wagon Bridge, One Mile Long, Kearney, Nebraska.  Approximate date early 1900’s.

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Grants Available for Community-Wide Reading Programs

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A Big Read is a month-long series of programs centered around one NEA Big Read title.  Programs should include a kickoff, a keynote, book discussions, and other artistic events to foster engagement with the selected title and encourage reading.

NEA Big Read is accepting applications from libraries to develop community-wide reading programs between September 2017 and June 2018.  13 new titles are available!

Organizations selected to participate in the NEA Big Read receive a grant, access to educational and promotional materials, and online training resources and opportunities.  Approximately 75 organizations from across the country will be selected.

Application deadline: January 26, 2017

Review the guidelines and application instructions, and discover all 28 titles available for selection at www.neabigread.org.

Not sure where to start?
visit neabigread.org/grantsfaq.php

Questions? Call Arts Midwest at 612-238-8010
or email neabigread@artsmidwest.org

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Friday Reads: The All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunion by Fannie Flagg

allgirlfillingstationslastreunionI grew up knowing Fannie Flagg from the ‘70s game show Match Game. Knowing of my love for books and movies, my Southern Uncle took me to visit Juliette, Georgia the actual film location of Fried Green Tomatoes (based on the book of the same name by Fannie Flagg) where a Whistle Stop Café actually exists and operates.  I have thought of Fannie as a comedic personality but having read nearly all of her books, she has a knack for balancing humor with poignant story lines and creating very memorable, sometimes outrageous characters and plots.

Fannie weaves two stories from different families together in this novel. In the first chapter we are introduced to Mrs. Earle Pool Jr., better known to her friends and family as Sookie. Sookie is happily married with four children and a loving husband but unfortunately is burdened with an extraordinarily difficult, high-maintenance mother named Lenore, all living in Alabama in 2005. We are taken back to 1909 Pulaski, Wisconsin and the Jurdabralinsky family. The patriarch, Stanislaw Ludic Jurdabralinsky, emigrated from Poland and he struggles to make a new home for his wife and children by opening a Filling Station that operates with roller skating daughters during WWII. Meanwhile back in 2005, Sookie receives a mysterious registered letter from the Texas Board of Health that puts her identity and her mostly quiet life into a tailspin. The collision of the two stories makes for a delightful read, ending with a twist upon a twist.

The great takeaway of this book for me was learning about the daughters from the Jurdabralinsky family who served in World War II as Women Airforce Service Pilots – WASP for short.

“During the existence of the WASP— 38 women lost their lives while serving their country.  Their bodies were sent home in poorly crafted pine boxes.  Their burial was at the expense of their families or classmates. In fact, there were no gold stars allowed in their parents’ windows; and because they were not considered military, no American flags were allowed on their coffins.  In 1944, General Arnold made a personal request to Congress to militarize the WASP, and it was denied.  Then, on December 7, 1944, in a speech to the last graduating class of WASP, General Arnold said, “You and more than 900 of your sisters have shown you can fly wingtip to wingtip with your brothers. I salute you … We of the Army Air Force are proud of you. We will never forget our debt to you.” With victory in WWII almost certain, on December 20, 1944, the WASP were quietly and unceremoniously disbanded.  What is amazing is that there were no honors, no benefits, and very few “thank you’s”.  In fact, just as they had paid their own way to enter training, they had to pay their own way back home after their honorable service to the military.  The WASP military records were immediately sealed, stamped “classified” or “secret”, and filed away in Government archives, unavailable to the historians who wrote the history of WWII or the scholars who compiled the history text books used today, with many of the records not declassified until the 1980s.” taken from: http://www.birdaviationmuseum.com/WASPS.html

This year I read books by Gloria Steinem and Ruth Bader Ginsberg – both advocates for women’s rights; and while Fannie Flagg writes another kind of book, this title fit in nicely and was a great selection for my book club with many things to discuss. If you enjoy audio books, please consider listening to this book as Fannie Flagg is the narrator. I think you’ll enjoy her comic southern accent and stereotypical Wisconsin accent both of which made me laugh many times.

 

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NCompass Live: Computer Networking for Librarians

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Join us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Computer Networking for Librarians”, on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Your computer network silently keeps your library running every day, but how much do you really know about it? Join Chris as he talks about how the network functions and the basic components that make it tick. We’ll review routers, switches, firewalls, and how everything works together, plus some tips on what to do if there’s a problem. Presented in a fun, accessible format, this session is introductory-level, and perfect for beginners.

Presenter: Chris Brown is assistant library director at the Pella (IA) Public Library. Chris has worked for more than eight years in public libraries as an IT professional, including managing the IT for a seven-branch library system. He recently completed work on the book Crash Course in Technology Planning, available now from Libraries Unlimited.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Nov. 23 – A Librarian Walks Into a Bar….
  • Nov. 30 – Reader of the Week
  • Dec. 7 – Technology Classes at Your Library
  • Dec. 14 – Best New Children’s Books of 2016
  • Dec. 28 – Best New Teen Books of 2016

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Throwback Thursday: Union Pacific Railroad Headquarters

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Postcard of the Union Pacific Railroad Headquarters located in Omaha, Nebraska.  Approximate date early 1900’s.

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