NCompass Live: Explore Wearable Technologies and Book Connections for Youth

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Explore Wearable Technologies and Book Connections for Youth”, on Wednesday, April 22, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

In 2015 the hottest accessory for young and old is wearable technology and e-textiles. Wearable technology refers to devices that can be worn by users, taking the form of an accessory such as jewelry, sunglasses, a backpack, or even actual items of clothing like shoes or a jacket. A benefit of wearable technology is that it can conveniently integrate tools, devices, power needs, and connectivity within a user’s everyday life and movements.

This NCompass Live focuses on “wearable tech” projects and e-textile projects for youth in your library. Dagen Valentine, Graduate Assistant from Nebraska 4-H will be presenting wearable/e-textiles tech youth project ideas for libraries. He’s selected a fiction and a non-fiction book for each of these age-groups, grades K-5, middle school and high school. He’ll suggest wearable tech projects that can be done with each book. Dagen will share information on where to purchase the hardware for the wearable tech projects he highlights in today’s webinar.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • April 29 – Tech Talk with Michael Sauers: Wreck the Library: How to Host a Tech Take Apart
  • May 6 – Let’s Make This Look Good: Graphic Design for Maximum Engagement
  • May 20 – Reading & Sharing: The System Directors Talk About Books
  • June 3 – Connecting to your community through the Human Library program: The Pace University Library experience

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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See You at the NLA Public Library and Trustee Section Spring Meetings!

NLC Logo 500x500

Nebraska Library Commission staff look forward to joining Nebraska librarians at the upcoming NE Library Association Public Library and Trustee Section Spring Meetings: April 22 in Alliance, April 23 in Kearney, and April 24 in Columbus. Presenter Valerie Gross, President and CEO of the Howard County Library System in Maryland, will help us examine the strategy of aligning our libraries with the educational mission of our communities to help us tell the story of “Who We Are, What We Do, Why It Matters: Why Nebraska Needs Libraries More than Ever!”

We’ll be staffing a table to share materials to help you reposition your library as a community education resource and your library staff as educators, including:

Books Are Just the Beginning…check out this blog that can direct any Nebraskan to your library and help illustrate the many ways libraries function as educational resources at http://booksarejustthebeginning.com/

Online Self-Directed Education…learn about Skillsoft online classes funded by the Nebraska Library Commission to help train library staff to serve as community educators (http://nlc.nebraska.gov/ce/), United for Libraries (http://www.ala.org/united/nebraska) resources funded by the Nebraska Library Commission for training Trustees/Friends/Foundations, and the Nebraska Library Commission budget request to provide self-directed education programs for all Nebraska residents through their local library (http://nlc.nebraska.gov/stats/online_selfdirected_education_2015.pdf)

Nebraska eReads…pick up materials to tell your community about downloadable eBook and audio book resources (http://nlc.nebraska.gov/stats/eReads.pdf) or print your own at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/overdrive/overdriveinfo.aspx#mm

Nebraska Memories…find out how these digitized historical and cultural resources can illustrate the role of the library in assisting a variety of learners and researchers of all ages, see http://memories.ne.gov/.

NebraskAccess…check out the posters and business cards that you can print with your library password and share with learners in your community to help reinforce the message of how integral libraries are to the community learning environment—customize and print at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskaccess/promotingdb.aspx

Nebraska Public Libraries are Equalizers…see how statistics can be used to tell the story of how your public library responds to the needs in your community and serves specific target audiences with educational resources, along with instructive and enlightening experiences, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/stats/general_2015.pdf

NCompass E-Newslist…Keep up with news from the Nebraska Library Commission to help you enhance your library’s visibility by signing up to receive our short weekly email at http://eepurl.com/HSkX

 

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Friday Reads: Fabricated: The New World of 3D Printing

Fabricated

Despite being two years old this book by Hod Lipson and Melba Kurman is a great introduction to all of the major concepts behind 3D printing. Not only does it explain the technology but looks at different types of printing materials from ABS plastic to shortbread and 3D printing’s impact on everything from education to architecture.

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Award for Promotion of Literature to be Presented at April 25 Nebraska Book Festival

NCB logo

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
April 16, 2015

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Mary Jo Ryan
402-471-3434
800-307-2665

Award for Promotion of Literature to be Presented at April 25 Nebraska Book Festival

The Nebraska Center for the Book will present the Mildred Bennett Award to Nebraska Library Commission Director Rod Wagner. The award, to be presented at the April 25 Nebraska Book Festival, honors Wagner for his many years of service to Nebraska’s readers and writers. This award honors an individual who has made a significant contribution to fostering the literary tradition in Nebraska. The 2015 award is a framed photograph by Steve Ryan entitled, “Woodcliff Lakes, NE.05.”

The award is named for Mildred Bennett, the charismatic founder and long-time president of the Willa Cather Pioneer Memorial and Educational Foundation. Bennett could have literally stepped out of a Willa Cather novel. Like some of Cather’s heroines, she was a strong, fiercely independent, intelligent woman, who loved the land and planted her roots deeply in the soil of Webster County, Nebraska. During her lifetime, Mildred Bennett was recognized as a foremost authority on Willa Cather by literary organizations and universities across the country.

The award is presented annually at the Nebraska Book Festival. This year the festival will be held on Saturday, April 25 at the University of Nebraska Omaha’s Weitz Community Engagement Center. Public admission to the Festival is free. It will feature writers workshops in the morning and author readings/talks in the afternoon. In the evening, the student/teacher writing teams of the NeBooks Project will present an iBooks Showcase. The Bookworm and University of Nebraska Press will offer books by Nebraska authors for sale throughout the event. The Nebraska Book Festival is presented by the Nebraska Center for the Book, Humanities Nebraska, and Nebraska Library Commission, with support from Friends of the University of Nebraska Press and the NeBooks Project. Visit http://bookfestival.nebraska.gov/2015/index.aspx for a complete schedule of free readings and workshops and other information.

The Nebraska Center for the Book is housed at the Nebraska Library Commission and brings together the state’s readers, writers, booksellers, librarians, publishers, printers, educators, and scholars to build the community of the book, supporting programs to celebrate and stimulate public interest in books, reading, and the written word. The Nebraska Center for the Book is supported by the Nebraska Library Commission.

As the state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services, bringing together people and information.

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.

 

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Focus on Nebraska authors: Ted Kooser

Ted Kooser served as the United States Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 2004–2006 and spoke in many venues around the state and the country during his tenure. I heard him speak at the Lied Center in Lincoln, NE and I recall him sharing that he had been compared to a hobbit. In fact, one of his speeches at Wartburg College in 2012 was entitled: American Hobbit or a Great Storyteller. In 2003, I helped select his title Local Wonders: Seasons in the Bohemian Alps, for the Nebraska Book Award for Nonfiction and as a One Book One Lincoln finalist in 2005. It was also selected as One Book One Nebraska for 2011. I have given copies of this book to many friends and family members. Here is my favorite quote from that book:

If you can awaken inside the familiar and discover it new you need never leave home. Local wonders.

I remember Ted sharing how he hoped to make poetry more ubiquitous and approachable to readers. If you reread the line above it may not register as poetry or at least, not the kind you dealt with in your high school or college literature classes. If your book group would like to branch out and read something besides a fiction or non-fiction selection, try Local Wonders. Have your readers pick their favorite parts and read them aloud at your discussion. You may do the very thing Kooser hoped he could accomplish and make a poetry lover out of you.

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Throwback Thursday: Johnny Cash receiving award, 1981

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Award from the Nebraska Department of Education given to Johnny Cash for appreciation of his promoting the needs of illiterate adults, 1981.

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The Data Dude – PLS Wi-Fi

wifiThe Dude has been busy cleaning up data files from the public library survey (PLS) for submission to IMLS. Once the data is cleaned up, it will be posted on the NLC website. In the meantime, let’s review the new data element on this year’s public library survey that asked about the number of Wi-Fi sessions annually provided by Nebraska libraries. I know that reporting this data was problematic for many of you, so I appreciate you taking the time to collect and report it. The total number of Wi-Fi sessions for Nebraska libraries reported was 967,657. The Dude doesn’t have the complete data from this year’s survey, but for the sake of comparison, the total number of wired public computer uses in libraries last year was more than 2.2 million. It’s probably safe to assume the reported Wi-Fi number is much lower than reality. So, how do we get more accurate data collection next year? Some of you are already looking into technological solutions or methods to capture this data for next year’s survey. Thank you for doing that. Even if a technological solution (e.g. from your router or other software installed) is implemented, it is acceptable to take samples throughout the year (try and do it for different seasons of the year) and average them. Count what you see. In other words, if you see a couple of Dudes outside during the summer with tablets, laptops, or a tablet and a laptop, count both of them. Mobile devices make this a bit tricky – do you count someone using a smartphone or not? Well, it really depends. If the evidence from your observation leads you to believe they are online, then yes, count them. If not, don’t. Someone typing erratically is most likely texting and not surfing, so you wouldn’t count that. Make a judgment call. It doesn’t have to be an exact science, unless you do have one of these technological solutions in place, such as a log from your router or other software installed to capture each and every session. For more reading, see some of these links: Google Analytics (requires a captive portal or splash page), Cisco Meraki, Aerohive, Pfsense, and Who’s on My WiFi. The Library network’s Best Practices for Wireless Statistics also offers helpful guidelines to assist with capturing this data. Shaka.

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NCompass Live: What We’ve Learned: Tips & Tricks for Webinars That Deliver The Goods

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “What We’ve Learned: Tips & Tricks for Webinars That Deliver The Goods”, on Wednesday, April 15, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Staff of the Nebraska Library Commission have either attended, produced, or delivered more than 500 webinars in the past decade and they’d like to encourage others to try out this communications platform. In this episode, NLC staff Christa Burns, Laura Johnson, and Michael Sauers will share many of the lessons they’ve learned over the years about how to produce, host, and deliver successful webinars.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • April 22 – Explore Wearable Technologies and Book Connections for Youth
  • April 29 – Tech Talk with Michael Sauers: Wreck the Library: How to Host a Tech Take Apart
  • May 6 – Let’s Make This Look Good: Graphic Design for Maximum Engagement
  • May 20 – Reading & Sharing: The System Directors Talk About Books

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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If Pinterest Existed…

The popular website Pinterest describes itself as a “visual discovery tool”. Nebraska Memories also allows for discovery based on visual resources.

Can you imagine what it would be like if Pinterest existed when some of these photographs were taken? I took a moment to let my imagination roam and come up with some Pinterest-esque caption for these great images. Once I got going, I discovered that Nebraska Memories hits several of the major categories you will find on Pinterest today: parties, food, fashion, kids, décor, and of course, cats!

wedding cheese making party boys playing dorm room hats and muffs cat Image Map

Just like an image on Pinterest can lead you to a great recipe or DIY project, an image in Nebraska Memories can lead you to an interesting story about Nebraska’s past. Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, or contact Beth Goble, Historical Services Librarian, or Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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Friday Reads: Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore

FridayReads Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour BookstoreRobin Sloan has written a yarn that stretches from books to technology to ancient knowledge, typography to coded secrets, intrigue to cults, friendship to love. He uses historical facts combined with present day real life ‘Google” to take our champions on a quest for the “key to life”. Our main character, Clay Jannon, needs a job, and where does he land but the strangest bookstore he has ever set foot in. In the beginning Clay does what he’s told, but we all know rules need to be broken, the books must be read, so he does, and read them he cannot do. The bookshelves in this store are lined with volumes coded with puzzles, and Clay must find the key to solving them. He finds that the important codex vitae is 500 years old and is stored in a “cave” below a New York City corporation complete with black robes and solemn ceremonies. The capable Clay really does know where to find resourceful & talented friends, backers, and hackers. Together they form the Rebel Alliance as they become the warrior, the wizard, and the rogue.

“You know, I’m really starting to think the whole world is just a patchwork quilt of crazy little cults, all with their own secret spaces, their own records, their own rules.” –Clay Jannon, Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore.

Robin Sloan indicates that he is a media inventor. In his own words, he says a media inventor is “someone primarily interested in content—words, pictures, ideas—who also experiments with new formats, new tools, and new technology…. Media inventors feel compelled to make the content and the container.”

Do fantasy novels intrigue you? Does solving puzzles fit right up your alley? Do you want to go on your own quest? Have we maneuvered you into checking this out? Then our goal here is met.

Annette Hall & Janet Greser

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Focus on Nebraska authors: Alex Kava

Alex Kava writes full-time and lives in Omaha, Nebraska and Pensacola, Florida. She is a bestselling author known for her psychological suspense series featuring FBI profiler Maggie O’Dell. Fans of Maggie O’Dell will be interested in Kava’s new spinoff series featuring Ryder Creed, a retired marine dog handler. Creed’s investigative and rescue work with his dogs leads him to team up with O’Dell in both Breaking Creed, the first book in the Ryder Creed series, published in January 2015, and Silent Creed, the second book, scheduled for publication in July 2015.

Kava’s book One False Move was selected as the One Book One Nebraska for 2006. My book group read this title, much to the delight of one member who is an avid mystery reader, and had a good discussion about genre books as well as the book itself. As often happens when readers have first-hand knowledge of the location where a book’s actions take place, the familiar Nebraska setting also stimulated discussion.

We have several of Kava’s books in our book club collection including: At The Stroke of Madness, Black Friday, Fireproof, Hotwire, A Necessary Evil, One False Move, A Perfect Evil, The Soul Catcher, and Split Second. If you are concerned about reading the books in order – here is the series listing. Perhaps for the summer you may want to select several from her Maggie O’Dell series? Visit our book club kit page to make your selections!

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Throwback Thursday: displays of children’s books, 1923

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Displays of children’s books depicting what is good and bad reading material, 1923.

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The Data Dude – Wednesday Watch: Lilyhammer

dvd_holdings_netflixThis week will be the beginning installment of Wednesday Watch. At first, the Dude was going to focus exclusively on what he’s currently watching, namely: (1) Lilyhammer (Netflix streaming); and (2) Boardwalk Empire (HBO via DVD from the local public library). And while the focus will be (yes, I did in fact start this sentence with And, and I did read Richard Miller’s Friday Reads post last week about the Grammar Lady—sorry, Richard, this is a low-brow column) on Lilyhammer, I decided to take a look at Nebraska public library holdings (at least those cataloged on WorldCat) of the top original series DVD’s from Netflix, HBO, and Showtime. The reason for this is that while streaming services are becoming more and more affordable, many (including the Dude) still simply cannot afford to buy subscriptions to premium content, including the newly available HBO Now. The chart includes the four Netflix original dramas (Hemlock Grove, Lilyhammer, Orange is the New Black, and House of Cards), and two of the most viewed drama series offerings from both HBO (Sopranos and Game of Thrones) and Showtime (Dexter and Homeland). But let’s first turn our attention to some filler material.

Lilyhammer, billed as a Netflix original drama series, is actually part drama part comedy (just like some of the others in the chart). The main character, underboss Frank “the Fixer” Tagliano (played by Steven Van Zandt –Silvio Dante from the Sopranos), flips on his mob boss and enters the witness protection program. As a part of the deal, he requests to relocate to Lillehammer, Norway. The show originally aired on Norwegian TV, even though it is generally known as the first Netflix original series. It’s probably more appropriate to label this as a joint venture between Norwegian TV and Netflix. Anyway, Frank adopts his new identity as Giovanni “Johnny” Henriksen (born to Italian and Norwegian parents). The show is as much about his integration into the Norwegian town and culture as it is about Johnny’s criminal ways. As Jimmy Darmody said in Boardwalk Empire: “You can’t be half a gangster.” The Dude would venture to say that in Lilyhammer (at least at the point where he is at in the series) Johnny has more relatable than detestable qualities, if that is possible for a gangster. The show is a mix of Norwegian and English languages, so expect many subtitles. While the typical comedic mafia elements exist, it doesn’t come across as completely recycled, and the Norwegian elements add a freshness that is, well, refreshing. The Dude finds himself nodding at times during Boardwalk Empire; he hasn’t had that problem with Lilyhammer. One thing to note, though, is that the budget for Lilyhammer (16 million per season) is obviously much less than say House of Cards (60 million per season), and that is apparent.

dvd_bookOK, so I extracted the holdings figures from Worldcat for the chart to at the top right. HBO’s Game of Thrones tops the list. Surprisingly, (at least to the Dude) House of Cards (tied with Homeland – another great offering from Showtime) beats HBO’s the Sopranos and Showtime’s Dexter for the number of holdings by Nebraska libraries. I also extracted the holdings information for the corresponding books (see the chart to the right of this paragraph). House of Cards is the only one where the DVD holdings exceed book holdings, with DVD holdings 3 times more than the book.

The Dude should mention that sans Hemlock Grove (he gets a little skittish with Horror) he’s seen and recommends all the series titles mentioned in the charts. He’s only read some of the Song of Ice and Fire (Game of Thrones) books (got bored about midway through A Feast for Crows), and frankly, does not have the desire to read on, or any of the other titles mentioned. And that’s OK. All in all, any of these DVD series titles would be a welcome addition to your library collection. Shaka.

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Leadership Institute Set for August 10

Registration now to take part in the Nebraska Library Transitional Leadership Institute scheduled to begin on Monday, August 10, 2015. This Transitional Institute, held at the St. Benedict Retreat Center near Schuyler, will be an intensive five-day session open to previous NE Library Leadership Institute (NELLI) graduates and mentors to begin the process of envisioning what future library leadership development will look like in Nebraska while receiving additional leadership training. A non-refundable $300 fee for participants will be payable upon selection to attend.

The Institute will be facilitated by Becky Schreiber and John Shannon who have worked with the Nebraska Library Leadership Institute for the past fourteen years as well as “Snowbird” in Utah and state institutes in Alaska, California’s esteemed “Eureka!” Leadership Institute, Maryland, North Carolina, Ohio, Texas, and Australia’s “Aurora.” Schreiber and Shannon have done a great deal of consultation work with libraries, and understand the needs and challenges of the library world; and we are pleased to have them back to help in this transitional year.

Sessions at the Institute will include multi-generational issues, stages of leadership, building your personal brand and your legacy, assertiveness in critical relationships, and building Learning Libraries to encourage innovation. A tentative schedule may be found at http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/nebraskalibraries.site-ym.com/resource/resmgr/NLLI/NLLI_Revised_schedule.pdf. On Thursday, August 13, in order to have as much input from those across the state as possible, the Institute will grow to 100 attendees and as we look at the past, present and future of library leadership, celebrate our successes, review current needs and invite additional information for the future vision, including actions required to transition into future leadership development for the state. If you are unable to come for the entire five day institute and would like your voice to be heard in these conversations, please register for the all day Thursday session, lunch included, $40.00 per person.

The Nebraska Library Transitional Leadership Institute is sponsored by the Nebraska Library Association.  Funding for the Institute is generously provided by the Nebraska Library Commission, the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, the University of Nebraska, Omaha, the Nebraska Library Association and other organizations that support library leadership development.

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NCompass Live: Every Hero Has A Story: Summer Reading Program 2015

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Every Hero Has A Story: Summer Reading Program 2015″, on Wednesday, April 8, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Sally Snyder, Coordinator of Children and Young Adult Library Services at the Nebraska Library Commission, will give brief book talks of new titles pertaining to the 2015 Summer Reading Program themes: Every Hero Has A Story (children’s theme) and Unmask! (teen theme).

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • April 15 – What We’ve Learned: Tips & Tricks for Webinars That Deliver The Goods
  • April 22 – Explore Wearable Technologies and Book Connections for Youth
  • April 29 – Tech Talk with Michael Sauers: Wreck the Library: How to Host a Tech Take Apart

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Friday Reads: The Grammar Lady: How to Mind Your Grammar in Print and in Person

BookCoverThe Grammar LadyOK. I admit it – I’m a bit of a grammar snob. I know I’m opening myself up to criticism if I were to make a mistake. [Notice how I used the subjunctive – “were” not “was,” just now.] I ask for your sympathy. I attended a high school in eastern Pennsylvania that, in English classes from grades 9 through 12, we learned grammar, spelling, diagramming sentences, and vocabulary every year. The point I’m making here is, we had all this drummed into our wee heads, so we could not help but become somewhat obsessive about it. However, when I taught ninth-grade English in a high school in western Pennsylvania just  four years later, there was no place in the curriculum for grammar – that’s how quickly matters had changed. (I taught some grammar anyway.)

If you are interested in learning more about English grammar, spelling, vocabulary, and usage – and learning about these in a way that is perhaps more fun than the methods my classmates and I were exposed to – you couldn’t do much better than acquiring a copy of The Grammar Lady: How to Mind Your Grammar in Print and in Person, by Mary Newton Bruder.  Starting a Web site in Pittsburgh entitled, “The Grammar Lady,” the author set herself up to answer any question that might be thrown at her related to grammar, whether directly or tangentially. I think she realizes that she is a bit of a grammar snob too, but she delivers her message in amusing ways with laugh-out-loud examples of how grammatical, spelling, vocabulary, and language usage mistakes can get in the way of communicating what one really wants to get across.

Bruder begins the book by laying out why grammar is important. Some of the major reasons:

  • It can save time by keeping us out of situations (through misunderstanding or offense) that we later have to apologize for. [Yes, I know I ended that sentence with a preposition – excuse me!]
  • It enhances communication.
  • People are judged on the basis of their grammar (especially important during job interviews).

The author makes the point that students should be taught the basics of grammar by the third grade, and after that spend time refining that knowledge and learning vocabulary and more complex sentence structure. She also says it’s a waste [not “waist’] of time diagramming sentences. I disagree with that. [I really enjoyed learning to diagram sentences. I learned parts of speech by that method which, I think, helped with foreign languages too.]

One of my favorite aspects of this book is the amusing examples she offers of unintentional mistakes she sees in advertisements, company memos, school assignments, with many of these sent to her Web site. Here are a few:

  • From a government-contract proposal: “We have ascertained that the project will require 66 man-moths of experience.”
  • “The guest book is in charge of Mary Jane,” rather than as it should be, the other way around.
  • “They referred a woman with a broken exhaust pipe and three flat tires.”
  • “Hopefully it won’t rain tomorrow,” rather than “I hope it won’t rain tomorrow.” [Later in the book she describes this development as a battle that may already be lost.]
  • The bugaboo of the parts of speech related to the verbs “lie” (meaning to recline), and “lay” (meaning to place something on a table, for example).
  • A sportscaster and weatherman on a local television station described what they called a “heart-rendering” story.

In one sense I do the author a disservice. She may be a bit of an elitist, but she does allow for the fact that the English language does change, and that there is a difference between the written and the spoken language. However, there are some things she cannot abide, one of them being overuse of the word “like,” in a sentence such as, “It was . . . like . . . cold.” She refers to this as, an “inarticulate stutter,” all the while admitting that she has never seen it in print since it is mostly a bothersome habit of some speakers.

I recommend that you pick up this book – if you want to learn about grammar, spelling, vocabulary, language usage, and so forth, or if you just want to be amused at the many ways that we can mess up what it is we are trying to say to each other. For those who are interested, you may also want to look up another related book – Eats, Shoots & Leaves by Lynne Truss.

 

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Throwback Thursday: Carnegie Library in Havelock, Nebraska built in 1907

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Carnegie Library in Havelock, Nebraska built in 1907.  Havelock has been incorporated into Lincoln and is located on the Northeast side of town.  The library is no longer in existence.

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Young Nebraskans Win Writing Competition

NCB logoFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 1, 2015

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Mary Jo Ryan 402-471-3434 800-307-2665

Young Nebraskans Win Writing Competition

Young Nebraska writers will receive Letters about Literature award certificates from Gov. Pete Ricketts on April 8, 2015 at a proclamation-signing ceremony celebrating National Library Week, April 12-18, 2015. Letters about Literature is a national reading and writing promotion program. Nearly 50,000 adolescent and young readers nationwide in grades four through twelve participated in this year’s Letters about Literature program, hundreds of them from Nebraska. The competition encourages young people to read, be inspired, and write back to the author (living or dead) who had an impact on their lives.

This annual contest is sponsored nationally by the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress. The Center for the Book was established in 1977 as a public-private partnership to use the resources of the Library of Congress to stimulate public interest in books and reading. The Nebraska competition is coordinated and sponsored by the Nebraska Center for the Book, Nebraska Library Commission, and Houchen Bindery Ltd.

Young Nebraska writers to be honored are:

Winners

  • Emma Harner, Lincoln, for a letter to Karen Hesse
  • Owen Morrow, Omaha, for a letter to Mike Lupica
  • Ashley Xiques, Omaha, for a letter to Leigh Bardugo

 Alternate Winners  

  • Grace Gutierrez, Omaha, for a letter to Deborah Wiles
  • Clio Reid, Lincoln, for a letter to Lewis Carroll
  • Morgan Curran, Arapahoe, for a letter to Beatrice Sparks

The students wrote personal letters to authors explaining how his or her work changed their view of themselves or the world. They selected authors from any genre, fiction or nonfiction, contemporary or classic. Winners were chosen from three competition levels: upper elementary, middle, and secondary school.

The Nebraska winners will be honored at a luncheon and receive cash prizes and gift certificates. Their winning letters will be placed in the Jane Pope Geske Heritage Room of Nebraska Authors at Bennett Martin Public Library in Lincoln. They will advance to the national competition, with a chance to win a trip to Washington, D.C. for themselves and their parents. For more information see http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/programs/LAL.html.

The Nebraska Center for the Book is housed at the Nebraska Library Commission and brings together the state’s readers, writers, booksellers, librarians, publishers, printers, educators, and scholars to build the community of the book, supporting programs to celebrate and stimulate public interest in books, reading, and the written word. The Nebraska Center for the Book is supported by the Nebraska Library Commission. As the state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services, bringing together people and information.

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.

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Nebraska Learns 2.0: Memes & Doormice

jihz9The Nebraska Learns 2.0 Thing for April is All Your Memes Are Belong to Us.

This month we’re going to take a look at memes; those wonderful “viral ideas” that get passed around online every day. We’re focusing on tools that allow you to create image-based memes but also a great source for explaining those ones you just can’t seem to make sense of.

Another facet of Nebraska Learns 2.0 is BookThing. Each month we pick a single title that we feel has relevance to librarianship and/or information theory. Some of the titles will be very obviously related; while others may not seem so on the surface but there is a connection. Your assignment will be to read the book and create a blog post answering some questions about the title.

What-the-Doormouse-Said-196x300The BookThing for April is What the Dormouse Said by John Markoff.

Nebraska Learns 2.0 is the Nebraska Library Commission’s ongoing online learning program. It is a self-discovery program which encourages participants to take control of their own learning and to utilize their lifelong learning skills through exploration and PLAY.

Each month, we offer you an opportunity to learn a new Thing (or lesson). You have all month to complete that Thing and receive one CE credit. You may choose which Things to do based on personal interest and time availability If the Thing of the month doesn’t interest you or if you are particularly busy that month, you can skip it.

If you are new to Nebraska Learns 2.0, your first assignment is to sign up to participate. This program is open to ALL Nebraska librarians, library staff, library friends, library board members and school media specialists.

We hope you’ll join your library colleagues in the fun as you learn about new and exciting technologies!

 

 

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The Data Dude – New Public Library Maps

mapShaka. Buried in the depths of the data services page of the NLC website is a section devoted to mapping. There are two new maps that were added to this section this week. Both are maps of Nebraska public libraries. The first is organized by service population, the second by library system. Similar maps have been on the website before, but these differ in that the information bubbles contain revised library photos, links to the library’s social media accounts (if those exist), and links to the library website. Please check your library marker and information bubble to make sure everything is up to date. There is a new section on the library supplemental survey called “Internet Services” where you can update any web links. Incidentally, it should be noted that whenever any of this information changes, you can update it from the supplemental survey at any time (it doesn’t necessarily have to be survey time). If you have any questions, comments, or suggestions about the maps, please let me know.

Posted in General, Information Resources, Library Management, Public Relations, Technology, Uncategorized | Leave a comment