What’s Sally Reading?

 The 2016 Teens Top Ten Nominees Announced

The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), has officially announced the nominees for the 2016 Teens Top Ten.  It is a teen choice list containing titles recommended by teens and voted on by teens across the country.  Teen readers are encouraged to read as many of the nominees as they can, and vote for their favorites starting on August 15th through Teen Read Week (October 9-15, 2016).  The final Top Ten will be announced the week following Teen Read Week.  For an annotated list of the nominees, go to this PDF and share it with your teens!

Johnson004To Catch a Cheat by Varian Johnson is the sequel to The Great Greene Heist which came out in May of 2014.  Jackson Greene (8th grade) has again promised no more schemes or pranks, and stuck with it.  He is surprised when the principal calls him into his office and accuses him and Charlie (his best friend) of flooding the school over the weekend.  There is even video evidence they did it.  They did not do it.  Now they need to discover who doctored the video, and what can be done to clear their names.  The con they concoct will do the trick, if everyone can stick to their task.  Great for middle school readers who love teens getting one over on scalawags.

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

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Download 67,000 Historic Maps

rumsey-map-e1461133111206If you love looking at maps as much as I do, you and your patrons will really enjoy the website I’m sharing with you today.  Please read on…

Standford University is excited to announce the arrival of the David Rumsey Map Center in April. While these kinds of university improvements are rarely of much interest to the general public, this one highlights a collection worth giving full attention. Well, for those of us, that is, who love maps.

You do not need to be a Stanford student or faculty or staff member to access the vast treasures of the Rumsey Map collection, nor do you need to visit the university or its new Center. Since 1996, the Rumsey collection’s online database has been open to all, currently offering anyone with an internet connection access to 67,000 maps from all over the globe, spanning five centuries of cartography. Rumsey’s holdings constitute, writes Wired, “the dopest map collection on Earth,” and though its physical housing at Stanford is a huge boon to academic researchers, its online archive is yours for the browsing, searching, and downloading, whoever and wherever you are.

Pages like the 1867 map “Twelve Perspectives on the Earth in Orbit and Rotation,” contains detailed publication information, the ability to zoom in and examine the tiniest details, and an “export” function allowing users to download a variety of resolutions up to 12288 pixels. (The same holds true for all other maps.) There’s also a new feature for many maps called “Georeferencing” (see a short introductory video here), which matches the map’s contours with other historic maps or with more accurate, modern satellite images.

In the case of “Twelve Perspectives on the Earth in Orbit and Rotation,” the georeferencing function returns an error message stating “this is not a map.” But in terrestrial images, like the topographical map of the Yosemite Valley above, we can choose specific portions to georeference, use the “visualize” function to see how they match up to contemporary views, and conduct an accuracy analysis. (Georeferencing requires sign-in with a free account, or you can use your Google, Facebook, or Twitter log-ins.) Georeferencing is not available for all maps, yet. You can help the Rumsey collection expand the feature by visiting this page and clicking the “Random Map” link.

The Rumsey Collection contains a seemingly inexhaustible supply of cartographic images, such as the colorful aerial view of New York City from 1900, above, and the 1949 composite map of the Soviet Union, at the top of the post. In addition to the maps themselves—most works of art in their own right—the database is full of other beautiful images related to geography, such as the fabulous, full-color title page below for the 1730 Atlas Novus sive Tabulae Geographicae by Matthaeus Seutter.

David Rumsey—currently President of the digital publishing company Cartography Associates—began collecting maps and “related cartographic materials” in 1980. Since then, his physical collection has grown to include over 150,000 maps, to be housed at the Stanford Center that bears his name, and he has received several awards for making his collection available online. The cartography enthusiasts among us, and the hardcore scholars, can likely look forward to many more maps appearing in the web archive. For now, there’s no shortage of fascinating material.

On the site’s homepage, they highlight these areas worth exploring:

The historical map collection has over 67,000 maps and images online. The collection includes rare 16th through 21st century maps of America, North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, Pacific, and the World.

Popular collection categories are celestial, antique atlas, globe, school geography, maritime chart, state, county, city, pocket, wall & case, children’s, and manuscript maps. Search examples: Pictorial maps, United States maps, Geology maps, California map, Afghanistan map, America map, New York City map, Chicago map, and U.S. Civil War maps. Browse  map categories: What, Where, Who, When. The collection is used to study history, art, genealogy, explorations, and family history.

Enjoy!

Reprinted from Open Culture : the best free cultural & educational media on the web, April 20th, 2016.

Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training, General, Information Resources, Technology, Uncategorized, What's Up Doc / Govdocs | Leave a comment

NCompass Live: Welcome the World to Your Library: Creating a Multilingual Library Introduction Video

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Welcome the World to Your Library: Creating a Multilingual Library Introduction Video”, on Wednesday, May 4, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

In 2013, Lincoln City Libraries was named an “American Dream Library” grant recipient by the ALA. Our grant-funded project, intended to add or expand literacy services for adult English language learners, included the creation of library use videos in English, Arabic, Karen, Russian, Spanish and Vietnamese languages. We’ll share the challenges and rewards of partnerships, scriptwriting, filming, translation and promoting our video to welcome and introduce new users to their libraries.

Presenters: Kathryn Kelley & Katie Murtha; Lincoln City Libraries.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • May 11 – Linux Laptops for Libraries
  • May 25 – Creating a Blended Learning Space in Your Library

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: A Week in Winter, by Maeve Binchy

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Talk about “johnny-come-lately,” just last week I picked up a paperback copy of this title at a used-book sale at Greenwood Public Library. I had gone there on a trip back from Papillion to see the renovation completed in Greenwood, partly with money from the Kreutz Bennett Donor Advised Fund. I’d been meaning to read something by Maeve Binchy for years but hadn’t, fascinated as much by her name as anything. I’m sure Binchy fans are probably appalled that I’d waited so long. Now, as it turns out, this title is the very last one she wrote; she died shortly after finishing this book.

A Week in Winter tells the charming story (actually many stories) of a host of eventual guests at Stone House, a new guest house located in what had been a run-down mansion on the west coast of Ireland, high overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. Three elderly sisters, had lived a “beans-and-toast” existence there, with Queenie the only survivor. The proprietress of this venture is a former resident of Stoneybridge, the town in which the place is located. She has returned from a long stay in the States with some money to invest in her hometown. Her story is that she is returning following the death of her spouse in a car wreck. As with many of the characters in this story, however, her biography is not quite as presented to the world.

A cast of characters descends upon Stone House during its first week in business, from many venues – the U.S., Sweden, England, Ireland (of course), and so forth. The author sets the scene with each one coming to this “restful place for a holiday by the sea” for quite different reasons. One guest couple wins second place in a travel contest (and they’re not happy about not going to Paris instead). One of the staff is sent there following a reform school stint. Another guest arrives following a devastating affair. (She’s the librarian!) Another received her stay as a retirement gift from teaching. (She is probably the only character who is not rejuvenated by her stay.) Still another — the one from Sweden – is faced with taking over his father’s button-down business, while he’d rather be playing music in local Irish pubs.

My guess is that Binchy fans will love this book. It felt to me a bit like what one of the characters says: “Problems don’t solve themselves neatly like that, due to a set of coincidences.” It does appear that the circumstances in which each character finds herself or himself are too easily “wrapped up” in the story. However, the author is such a good writer that I think I’ll try at least one more title. Any suggestions out there about which of her other nineteen titles is worth a go?

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Trees, Trees and More Trees!

Hanscom ParkSince moving to Nebraska I have discovered many new and interesting facts. For example, Nebraska was the first state admitted to the United States after the Civil War. Nebraska is also home to both the National Museum of Roller Skating and the International Quilt Center and Museum. It’s also the site of the first American commemoration of Arbor Day. According to the Arbor Day Foundation, Arbor Day was first celebrated in 1872, in Nebraska City.

While J. Sterling Morton, who the Arbor Day Foundation credits with organizing that first Arbor Day, is not included in Nebraska Memories, there are many tree-filled photographs and postcards. Browsing through the collection, it seems as though trees pop up everywhere – in front of churches, libraries, schools, government buildings, and private homes. Trees even stand adjacent to Nebraska’s legendary cornfields!

Country road and fields near Bennington

In many of the images, the trees appear to have been deliberately planted. That is, I didn’t see a lot of pictures of broad forests, similar to those found in western Montana. For Green Terrace Hall, elevated viewexample, the trees surrounding Green Terrace Hall, on the campus of the Nebraska State Normal School in Kearney, grow in neat rows. This does not hold true for all the photographs and postcards I found. A postcard featuring two young women in Omaha’s Hanscom Park, depicts a meadow crowded with trees; while a postcard of Big Saddle Butte, near Crawford, shows trees scattered around a butte.

I’m sure in the coming months and years, I’ll learn many more fascinating bits of trivia. Here’s one more: Arbor Day is the last Friday of April. You don’t need to plant a tree to celebrate, but take a moment to enjoy the beauty of a tree.  Big Saddle Butte Lone Butte to right Crawford Neb.

Scene Hanscom Park Omaha Neb

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see  http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

 

 

 

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Throwback Thursday: South Omaha Carnegie Library

South Omaha

Exterior of the South Omaha, Nebraska Carnegie Library.

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The Data Dude – Do Space

Gold Guy Surfing On Business Reports

“Some of the simplest, most innovative things I’ve thought of just happened through conversation,”– Hans Bekale, Classless Agency, Omaha, NE

This week, the Dude almost decided to end his streak of weekly posts (and it will happen sooner or later), but then listened to a recent NET story about Do Space and for some reason started thinking about Marcus Aurelius and the exchange of ideas (no kidding). Now, before we get to the Do Space plug, a little side note. There could, theoretically, be a long dissertation on Marcus Aurelius, collaboration, and the power of patience, but another newfound quote seems to illustrate the Dude’s thoughts on these things a whole lot better:

The most valuable skill of a successful entrepreneur … isn’t ‘vision’ or ‘passion’ or a steadfast insistence on destroying every barrier between yourself and some prize you’re obsessed with. Rather, it’s the ability to adopt an unconventional approach to learning: an improvisational flexibility not merely about which route to take towards some predetermined objective, but also a willingness to change the destination itself. This is a flexibility that might be squelched by rigid focus on any one goal.

–Oliver Burkeman

So if you are planning a collaborative learning space or collaborative library program, check out the NET story. Perhaps this could inspire you or just give you a bit more information about the great work that is occurring at Do Space, both concerning collaboration and technology. Shaka.

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USDA Seeks Applications for Nearly $12 Million in Broadband Grants for Rural Communities

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Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has announced that USDA is soliciting applications for grants to establish broadband in unserved rural communities through its Community Connect program. Community Connect is administered by USDA’s Rural Utilities Service and helps to fund broadband deployment into rural communities where it is not economically viable for private sector providers to provide service.

“Through Community Connect and our other telecommunications programs, USDA helps to ensure that rural residents have access to broadband to run businesses, get the most from their education and benefit from the infinite services that fast, reliable broadband provides,” Vilsack said. “USDA is committed to supporting America’s rural communities through targeted investments in our bioeconomy and renewable energy, local and regional food systems, conservation initiatives and rural development.”

USDA plans to award up to $11.7 million in grants through the Community Connect grant program. The grants fund broadband infrastructure to help foster economic growth by delivering connectivity to the global marketplace. The grants also fund broadband for community centers and public institutions.

USDA has invested $160 million in more than 240 projects to bring broadband to unserved rural communities since the Community Connect Program was created in 2002.

In 2009, the Wichita Online telecommunications company in Cooperton, Okla., received a Community Connect grant to build a community center with computers. The center serves as an Internet library for local residents and is used by several government agencies. The sheriff’s office and volunteer fire department coordinate their public safety, fire protection and other emergency services from the center. During harvest season, many farmworkers use the computers to communicate with their family members far away. Cooperton is a farming and ranching community between the Slick Hills and Wichita Mountains in Southwest Oklahoma.

The minimum grant is $100,000 for FY 2016. The maximum award is $3 million. USDA announced new rules in 2013 to better target Community Connect grants to areas where they are needed the most. To view the rules, go to http://www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/community-connect-grants

Prior Community Connect grants cannot be renewed. However, existing Community Connect awardees may submit applications for new projects, which USDA will evaluate as new applications

This Community Connect round builds on USDA’s historic investments in rural America over the past seven years. Since 2009, USDA has worked to strengthen and support rural communities and American agriculture, an industry that supports one in 11 American jobs, provides American consumers with more than 80 percent of the food we consume, ensures that Americans spend less of their paychecks at the grocery store than most people in other countries, and supports markets for homegrown renewable energy and materials. USDA has provided $5.6 billion of disaster relief to farmers and ranchers; expanded risk management tools with products like to Whole Farm Revenue Protection; helped farm businesses grow with $36 billion in farm credit; provided $4.32 billion in critical agricultural research; established innovative public-private conservation partnerships such as the Regional Conservation Partnership Program; developed new markets for rural-made products, including more than 2,500 biobased products through USDA’s BioPreferred program; and invested $64 billion in infrastructure, housing and community facilities to help improve quality of life in rural America.

Since 2009, USDA Rural Development (#USDARDThis is an external link or third-party site outside of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) website.) has invested $11 billion to start or expand 103,000 rural businesses; helped 1.1 million rural residents buy homes; funded nearly 7,000 community facilities such as schools, public safety and health care facilities; financed 180,000 miles of electric transmission and distribution lines; and helped bring high-speed Internet access to nearly 6 million rural residents and businesses. For more information, visit www.usda.gov/results.

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Cats Rule and Dogs Drool

Henrietta Nelson holding a catEda Nelson holding a catAccording to my coworker, cats rule and dogs drool. I’m not sure I agree with him but don’t tell him that. He is one of many cat lovers who work at the Library Commission. If you work with a cat lover, are friends with a cat lover or are a cat lover yourself you probably see or are sent cute cat pictures and videos on a regular basis. The internet is full of cat related pictures and videos and social media has made it easy for folks to share their favorites.

Alice Nelson and Mildred Nelson outside with two kittensPeople taking pictures of their cats is nothing new. In Nebraska Memories, I found 11 photos that included at least one cat. Photographer John Nelson took pictures of his nieces Alice, Mildred, Eda and Henrietta all holding cats or kittens. You can’t go wrong with pictures of kids with cats.

Interior of hardware storeJohn Nelson also took a picture of a cat in a hardware store. I find it amusing to see the cat sitting on top of the glass display case. I’m not sure if he intended for the cat to be the focus of the picture but the cat is more visible then the humans in the picture.

Cat on the kitchen table at the Wallace residenceThe other photos in Nebraska Memories that included cats were taken by William Wallace. William Wallace served as a vice president for the Omaha National Bank for many years, and it appears he was also an avid photographer.

Cats on a bed at Wallace residenceIt’s obvious that William meant for the cats to be the focus of his pictures. I’m guessing that the cats might have ruled the house. The cat looks content lying on the family’s kitchen table. Because the photos are black and white, it’s hard to tell if the cat on the table is also one of the cats sleeping on the bed. Do you think the cat on the bed Cat on a banister at the Wallace residencewith the white fur on his face and neck is the same cat playing on the banister? Are they the same cats that are providing entertainment in these three pictures taken in the Wallace’s library?Cats and a woman in the library at the Wallace residence

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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NCompass Live: Lessons Learned Establishing a Technology Makerspace

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Lessons Learned Establishing a Technology Makerspace”, on Wednesday, April 27, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

The library is the intellectual crossroads of the university, a place where students come to research, explore, and discover. It was in this spirit that a new service – an Innovation Lab – was established during the Fall Quarter of 2015 in the John M. Pfau Library at California State University, San Bernardino.

The Innovation Lab is a technology-focused “Makerspace” for students that encourages creativity and inquiry, facilitates cross-disciplinary collaboration, and promotes true innovation. The ability to work hands-on with emerging technologies and rapidly prototype solutions gives students greater understanding of real-world problems. The lab is open to all CSUSB students regardless of discipline, skill set, or background. In addition, the lab is a safe space where students can learn to persevere in the face of failure – a skill central to lifelong learning and success in the 21st century.

Embarking on an innovative new service can be rife with pitfalls and obstacles. The presenter, former Head of Library Information Technology at CSU’s Pfau Library, will share the logistics involved with planning, implementing and maintaining a makerspace. Technologies (3D scanning, printing, and modeling; CNC milling, Arduino, RaspberryPi), services (workshops, peer-to-peer tutoring), and policies will be discussed. He will also share mistakes as well as triumphs, and will address the lessons learned during the first year of operation.

Presenter: Jonathan Smith, Director for Library Technology, Sonoma (Calif.) State University.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • May 4 – Welcome the World to Your Library: Creating a Multilingual Library Introduction Video
  • May 11 – Linux Laptops for Libraries
  • May 25 – Creating a Blended Learning Space in Your Library

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads : The House Girl

HouseGirlThe House Girl, the historical fiction debut by Tara Conklin, is an unforgettable story of love, history, and a search for justice, set in modern-day New York and 1852 Virginia.

Conklin’s use of alternating chapters weaves together the story of an escaped slave in pre–Civil War Virginia, and a determined junior lawyer in present-day New York City. The House Girl follows Lina Sparrow as she looks for an appropriate lead plaintiff in a lawsuit seeking compensation for families of slaves. In her research, she learns about Lu Anne Bell, a renowned prewar artist whose famous works might have actually been painted by her slave, Josephine.  While retracing Josephine’s often-elusive path, she also uncovers some troubling facts about her own life and parents, and the startling lie that formed the basis of her childhood and young adulthood.

I started listening to The House Girl on audio, then was so caught up by the story, that I checked out the book from Lincoln City Libraries.  Definitely a good read!

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Throwback Thursday: Sidney Carnegie Library

Sidney

Exterior photo of the Sidney, Nebraska Carnegie Library built in 1917.

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The Data Dude on the Latest NLC Data Illustration

Gold Guy Surfing On Business ReportsThanks to all of you for submitting your annual public library surveys. Our data collection is now closed, and we have upped our response rates to almost 90%. Now begins the process of submitting the data to IMLS. In the meantime, in case you missed it, check out our latest data summary handout, using the most current 2014 data. Special thanks goes out to Tessa Terry here at NLC, for helping the Dude with these illustrations. Shaka.

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Libraries to Celebrate Money Smart Week® April 23-30, 2016

money-smart-weekLOGO2016Nebraska libraries are invited to join libraries across the country in celebrating Money Smart Week® April 23-30, 2016. Created by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago in 2002, Money Smart Week® is a public awareness campaign designed to help consumers better manage their personal finances. This is achieved through the collaboration and coordinated effort of hundreds of organizations across the country. Classes, activities, events, and programming will be offered to all demographics and income levels and will cover all facets of personal finance. Resources for local events are available at http://www.moneysmartweek.org/resources.

The American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office, in partnership with the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) Investor Education Foundation, recently announced that fifty public libraries will host a new traveling exhibition, Thinking Money. Two are located in Nebraska: Morton-James Public Library in Nebraska City and Lincoln City Libraries. Through an adventure-themed storyline, interactive iPad content and other fun activities, the exhibition explores themes like wants vs. needs, preparing for a rainy/sunny day and imagining your future self.

Comment below to share what your library is doing to help the people in your community  find the information they need to improve their financial decisions.

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Register Now for Summer and Fall LIS Classes

Central Community CollegeRegistration is now open for Summer and Fall online classes in Library and Information Services (LIS) at Central Community College (CCC).

Classes include:

  • Foundations of Library and Information Services
  • Reference Resources and  Services
  • Leadership and Management in Library and Information Agencies

For more information see: http://www.cccneb.edu/library, http://nowhiringatyourlibrary.nebraska.gov/LISFlyerSummerFall2016.pdf, or contact Dee Johnson at CCC, djohnson@cccneb.edu or 402-562-1418 or 877-222-0780, extension 1418.

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E-rate Form 471 Application Filing Window Extended to July 21

The application filing window for libraries for E-rate Form 471 has been extended until July 21!

See the USAC Special Edition News Brief for details.

To help you complete your E-rate forms, training materials and resources are available on the NLC E-rate webpage.

If you have any questions or need any assistance with your E-rate forms, please contact Christa Burns, 800-307-2665, 402-471-3107.

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NCompass Live: Collaborative Community Outreach for Local History and Genealogy

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Collaborative Community Outreach for Local History and Genealogy”, on Wednesday, April 20, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Learn about the Lincoln Lancaster County Genealogical Society’s unique relationship with Union College Library’s Heritage Room. These two special collections have different missions, but have discovered mutual benefits in working together to reach members of the community.

Presenters: Sabrina Riley, Library Director, Union College, Lincoln, NE & Judi Cook, Lincoln Lancaster County Genealogical Society.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • April 27 – Lessons Learned Establishing a Technology Makerspace
  • May 4 – Welcome the World to Your Library: Creating a Multilingual Library Introduction Video
  • May 11 – Linux Laptops for Libraries
  • May 25 – Creating a Blended Learning Space in Your Library

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Nebraska Libraries Invited to Host Readathon Event on May 21

50204652016readathonSaturday, May 21 is National Readathon Day, a day dedicated to the joy of reading and giving, when readers everywhere can join together in their local library, school, bookstore, and on social media (#Readathon2016) to read and raise funds in support of literacy. Nebraska libraries are invited to partner with the American Library Association (ALA), Penguin Random House, and libraries across the country by hosting events to benefit ALA’s Every Child Ready to Read initiative, a program that supports the early literacy development of children from birth to age five in libraries across the nation. For more information see http://www.readathonday.com/

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Friday Reads: Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, by Irin Carmon and Shana Knizhnik

ruthThis book came to my attention after I listened to Debra Winger read My Life on the Road by Gloria Steinem. The death of Justice Antonin Scalia precipitated selecting this title from my queue since Ginsburg and Scalia were known to have been fast friends despite their ideological differences. I am ashamed to confess how wholly unaware I was of the tremendous gender inequity around me as a younger woman.  Like watching episodes of Mad Men it is an all too visceral reminder of just how far we’ve come and how much we’ve yet to accomplish.

One reviewer wrote “her appointment to the Court by Bill Clinton will be seen as one of his greatest accomplishments” and I’m inclined to agree. Her quiet and pragmatic work on issues of equity and equality have made the world a little better and a little freer. Her uncanny ability to know which cases were ready to go forward and those that were not is helpful to think about as I examine current issues being debated in state legislative houses.

Learning about RBG’s marriage was a revelation of both envy and delight. I’ve always admired those kinds of partnerships and this book made me appreciate Marty as much as Ruth. Supporting Ruth and her career was his proudest accomplishment. It reminded me of Paul and Julia Child’s marriage.

The life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg is one worth knowing and one easily presented in this quick read. I don’t believe this book is meant to be a definitive biography of RBG but it is a tremendous introduction.

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Throwback Thursday: Shelton Carnegie Library

Shelton

Exterior photo of the Shelton, Nebraska Carnegie Library built in 1914.

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