NCompass Live: Innovating Access to Information with Libraries Without Borders’ Ideas Box

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Innovating Access to Information with Libraries Without Borders’ Ideas Box”, on Wednesday, June 29, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Libraries Without Borders is an international non-profit organization whose mission is to expand access to information by creating and supporting library programs around the world. Paloma Pradere, from Libraries Without Borders, will join us to talk about their project, the Ideas Box, a portable library/multi-media center toolkit for refugee and vulnerable populations. This ‘pop-up library’ includes its own satellite internet connection and power supply, laptops, tablets, books and ebooks, as well as many educational, informational, and leisure resources. She will give an overview of where the Ideas Box has been implemented, its impact in those communities, and share ideas for next steps.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • July 6 – Making Your Catalog Work for Your Community: How to Develop Local Cataloging Standards
  • July 13 – Libraries on the Edge: Technology Assessment Toolkit
  • July 27 – The Queer Omaha Archives
  • August 10 – Clouding Up: How to Use Cloud Storage

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: Disrupted

disrupted_coverIn Disrupted, Dan Lyons tells the story of his time working as a writer (mostly blogs) for the tech startup company HubSpot. Prior to working at HubSpot, Lyons had a number of writing gigs and most of them were technology related. His previous work included writing for Newsweek, New York Times Magazine, GQ, Vanity Fair, Wired, and writing the Secret Diary of Steve Jobs blog. When his position at Newsweek was eliminated, he found himself looking for work at the age of 50, while married with two kids to take care of (his wife had medical issues and was not working at the time). He started the search for new employment and eventually landed at HubSpot, a company that provides software for “inbound marketing.” Disrupted tells the story of Lyons searching for and then subsequently obtaining new employment (and the challenges that go with that) as an “older” adult (and with much younger colleagues), but also his general experience working within the unique tech environment. While not geographically Silicon Valley (HubSpot is located in Cambridge, Massachusetts) Lyons provides an apt description of an insider’s view from within a tech startup.

Lyons, albeit somewhat reluctantly, accepted the job at HubSpot for a few different reasons. For one, it was geographically close to home and his family. Secondly, he had a number of friends who reaped large financial benefits from working in tech startups (and had vouched that HubSpot was indeed legit), so there was a motivation of financial self interest. And thirdly, after writing about tech issues and companies for so long he was curious about experiencing the culture from an insider’s perspective. His experiences, as Disrupted details in often humorous and depressing fashion, were overall less than stellar. As he became immersed in the HubSpot culture, the realism of the organization he now was a part of settled in:

“This is the peppy, effervescent, relentlessly positive, incredibly hubristic and overconfident attitude that everyone in the HubSpot marketing department exudes from [the head] on down. These people are super cheery cheerleaders. The whole world of online sales and marketing is filled with people who listen to Tony Robbins audiobooks on their way to work and dream of unleashing the power within themselves, people who love schmaltzy, smarmy motivational-speaker guff about being passionate, following your dreams, and conquering fear.”

Lyons has now moved on from HubSpot, subsequently writing for HBO’s Silicon Valley (a gig he started while still at HubSpot). The thing that Lyons nails is his apt portrayal of the culture, including how these startups often don’t really make money, the lack of diversity (and apparent non-concern about it), sexism and ageism (Mark Zuckerberg once said that “Young people are just smarter”), and more concern with the fact that employees have bean bag chairs, ping pong tables, and unlimited supplies of beer, candy, and hype than actually producing a decent product that the average person understands. Lyons sums this up when mentioning the co-founders of Twitter (incidentally, Twitter hasn’t ever turned a profit), specifically Biz Stone, who has an estimated net worth of $200 million. Since leaving Twitter, Stone started two companies, Jelly and Super. As Lyons notes, no one understands what the companies actually do, including Stone himself:

“I know this is eye-rollingly, hallucinogenically optimistic…but our mission is to build software that fosters empathy.”

If you are interested in an insider’s view of tech startups, Disrupted is an easy and most entertaining read. If you liked HBO’s Silicon Valley, you would also like this book. And for the record, if you want to foster empathetic relationships, begin with your day to day interactions with real life human beings. Start with Hi. You don’t need software for that.

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Throwback Thursday: University Place Carnegie Library

UNI

Exterior photo of the University Place, Lincoln, Nebraska Carnegie Library built in 1916.

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Strategic Planning Workshops offered in the Western Library System

NLC Logo

If your public library is slated for re-accreditation in 2016 or in 2017, these workshops are for you!

Every three years accredited Nebraska public libraries have the opportunity to seek accreditation again for another three-year period. Libraries are accredited at one of three levels – Bronze, Silver or Gold – based on the number of points accumulated on the accreditation application form. Accreditation also requires that the library submit and have approved by the Commission, a strategic plan (learn more about Strategic Planning and Accreditation here).

Next month three Strategic Planning workshops will be offered in the Western Library System area:

• Tuesday, July 12, 2016 – Alliance Public Library (1750 Sweetwater Ave., Alliance)
• Thursday, July 14, 2016 – Lied Imperial Public Library (703 Broadway, Imperial)
• Tuesday, July 19, 2016 – Sidney Public Library (1112 12th Ave., Sidney)

Each workshop will run from 1:00 to 4:00 PM. You should have had lunch before you get to the workshop. To register for one of the workshops, go to the following link which will take you to the Commission’s Calendar on which you can register.

In case you are not sure of your accreditation status, following are the public libraries in Western Library System slated for re-accreditation in 2016, and 2017:

2016:
Bridgeport Public Library
Chadron Public Library
Chappell Memorial Library & Art Gallery
Dundy County Library (Benkelman)
Nancy Fawcett Memorial Library (Lodgepole)
Paxton Public Library
Sidney Public Library
Trenton Public Library

2017:
Crawford Public Library
Hastings Memorial Library (Grant)
Morrill Public Library
Goodall City Library (Ogallala)
Rushville Public Library

In addition the following unaccredited libraries which submitted their annual statistics this year (and received funding under the “Dollars for Data” program) are eligible to become accredited libraries:
Arthur County Library
Bayard Public Library
Sioux County Public Library (Harrison)
Hayes Center Public Library
Hemingford Public Library
Lewellen Public Library
Lyman Public Library
Minatare Public Library
Hooker County Library (Mullen)
Stratton Public Library
Wauneta Public Library

So, how about it? Come to one of the above workshops (and bring a board member or two along too) and find out what this strategic planning is all about. You might see that it is easier than you anticipate.

For questions, contact me at the Nebraska Library Commission:

Richard Miller
(800) 307-2665

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E-rate Funding Awarded to Nebraska Schools and Libraries

Yesterday, USAC released the first Wave of Funding Commitment Decision Letters (FCDLs) for E-rate Funding Year 2016. Congratulations to all Nebraska schools and libraries funded in Wave 1!

Your FCDL will now appear in your EPC account. You will receive an email notifying you that the FCDL has been issued, and then you will need to log into your EPC account to view it. Information and instructions about how to do that are in the June 3 News Brief.

After you receive your FCDL, you can go on to the next step in the E-rate process, filing your Form 486. This form is also submitted in your EPC account. Information and instructions on how to do that can be found in the June 10 News Brief.

If you are not in Wave 1, don’t panic! There are many more weekly Waves to come as USAC processes more applications. This is just the start of Funding Year 2016, more approvals are coming.

If you have any questions or need any assistance with your E-rate forms, visit the NLC E-rate webpage or contact Christa Burns, 800-307-2665, 402-471-3107.

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NCompass Live: 2016 One Book One Nebraska: The Meaning of Names

Join us for next week’s NCompass Live, “2016 One Book One Nebraska: The Meaning of Names“, on Wednesday, June 22, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

In this twelfth year of One Book One Nebraska, Nebraska libraries and other literary and cultural organizations continue to plan activities and events to encourage all Nebraskans to read and discuss the same book. Join us to hear more about this statewide reading promotion activity, sponsored by the Nebraska Library Commission, Humanities Nebraska, and the Nebraska Center for the Book.

We are very pleased to announce that our featured guest will be Karen Gettert Shoemaker, author of the 2016 selection, The Meaning of Names.

Join Nebraska Library Commission Director Rod Wagner and Nebraska Library Commission Communications Coordinator Mary Jo Ryan to:

  • Learn about how to create a successful local reading promotion using Nebraska’s year-long, statewide celebration featuring The Meaning of Names, by Karen Gettert Shoemaker.
  • Brainstorm strategies to read and discuss The Meaning of Names, a Nebraska-set novel with a World War I backdrop, which follows a German-American woman trying to raise a family in the heartland and keep them safe from the effects of war and the influenza panic, as well as from violence and prejudice.
  • Find tools to help engage your community in local activities to encourage them to come together through literature to explore this work in community-wide reading programs.
  • Learn about the Celebration of Nebraska Books, set for October 29, which will celebrate this book, along with the winners of the 2016 Nebraska Book Awards.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • June 29 – Innovating Access to Information with Libraries Without Borders
  • July 6 – Making Your Catalog Work for Your Community: How to Develop Local Cataloging Standards
  • July 13 – Libraries on the Edge

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: Seneca Falls Inheritance

For this weSenecaFallseks’ Friday Reads, I’ve decided to share a book related to my chosen craft, librarianship – Seneca Falls Inheritance, by Miriam Grace Monfredo.

As a historian and former librarian, Monfredo definitely has the skills and knowledge to write a fun and clever historical murder mystery. The story takes place in 1848 in upstate New York State during the first Women’s Rights Convention, and is the first in a series featuring librarian Glynis Tryon.

The feminist in me loves this book for the independent Glynis, who has been asked by Elizabeth Cady Stanton to help organize the Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls. The fact that Glynis is a librarian doesn’t hurt either. She’s a smart, stubborn, educated woman struggling to solve a woman’s murder in her small town. The New Yorker in me feels very much at home in Seneca Falls, a city I have actually visited myself.

I’ve re-read Seneca Falls Inheritance at least three times now, and I still find it both educational and entertaining. There are five more titles in this series, so once you’re hooked on Glynis and her adventures, there’s plenty more to read.

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Throwback Thursday: Tekamah Carnegie Library

Tekamah

Exterior photo of the Tekamah, Nebraska Carnegie Library built in 1916.

 

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Doc Spot : Firearm Laws in Nebraska–A Legislative Research Office Backgrounder

                                                                                             Firearm Laws in Nebraska–A Legislative Research Office BackgrounderCoverL3800B039-2016 provides an overview of laws  governing firearms in Nebraska. It also describes federal firearm laws to the extent they constitute a framework for state law.

Firearms are governed by myriad laws at the state and federal level. For purposes of this Backgrounder, we focus on laws pertaining to buying handguns, carrying concealed handguns, criminal history background checks, and the role of federally licensed firearms dealers. We also provide a reference guide to Nebraska’s other firearms laws, a chronology of significant federal law, and supplemental firearms information in a “Q and A” format.

This Backgrounder is not intended to take a position on the ownership, possession, sale, or use of firearms—issues many find polarizing—nor to offer legal advice. In writing this report, we have endeavored to be neutral on firearms while providing information during a time when the debate over firearms has intensified.

As evidence, at least 20 proposals pertaining to firearms were pending before the Legislature in 2016. (A list of the proposals can be found in Appendix B.) We hope senators and the public, in debating firearm issues, will find the information contained in this report to be a useful, introductory guide to Nebraska’s firearm laws.

The content of this report relies on state and federal laws and supplemental material produced by the FBI and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF).

In addition, several individuals aided our understanding of the nuances of firearm laws. In particular, we would like to thank Nebraska State Patrol Captain Mike Jahnke and Jeff Avey, records analysis supervisor, criminal identification division of the patrol.

If you have further questions about firearms, or any area of legislative interest,
please contact the Legislative Research Office, 402-471-2221.

This publication can be printed out by clicking the picture or title link above.
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NCompass Live: Passport to Vermont Libraries with Jessamyn West

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Passport to Vermont Libraries”, on Wednesday, June 15, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Librarian and technologist Jessamyn West discusses the Vermont Library Association’s statewide Passport to Vermont Libraries program now in its second year. The program is a statewide “visit all the libraries you can, because it’s fun!” project. With minimal cash outlay and use of many free tools we’ve been able to manage and run a program that helps many small libraries and their patrons be a part of something larger and share in the wonderful library system in the state of Vermont.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • June 22 – 2016 One Book One Nebraska: The Meaning of Names
  • June 29 – Innovating Access to Information with Libraries Without Borders

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Dogs Rule and Cats Drool

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post titled “Cats Rule and Dogs Drool” that highlighted the cat photos in Nebraska Memories. I don’t want to offend dog lovers, so today’s post has gone to the dogs.Seefus Tavern and confectionary store

While I don’t know if any of the cats were drooling in the photos, I do know when comparing the number of cat pictures to dog pictures in Nebraska Memories that dogs definitely rule. There are only 11 photos of cats in the collection compared to 70+ photos that contain at least one dog. To be fair in a number of the photos the dog is not the center of attention and is just part of the crowd. This is true in this 1927? photo of a group of men and a dog standing in front of the Seefus Tavern and confectionary store in Valley, NE. In the description of the photo, you will find the names of all of the men, but the dog will forever be nameless.

Fred Schumacher familyYou can also find dogs included in People and dogs in front of sod housemany of the family photos that were taken in front of the house. The Fred Schumacher family had at least two dogs that were included in their picture. Looking at the picture, I wonder if that white spot over by the chickens is a cat. The family in this photo, entitled People and dogs in front of sod house, included two large dogs in their photo. I wonder if the chicken was included on purpose or if it just wandered into the shot.

Fire Department, 1910-1911, Crawford, NebraskaIn other photos, dogs can be spotted front and center. Football team 1906ThGerman prisoners of war at Camp Atlantae man in the front row of this photo of the Crawford fire department is holding a dog sitting in the front row with him. The German prisoners of war at Camp Atlanta and the 1906 Nebraska State Normal School at Kearney football team also chose to include dogs in their group photos.

Man on horse with dogsAs you can see, some dogs were put to work. This man on a horse has a group of five dogs with him.

Have you ever seen a Dog walking on a tight rope? That was one well-trained dog.

Dog walking on tight rope

Denver Chop House Restaurant doggieI don’t know what to say about this poor dog who was dressed up to advertise the Denver Chop House Restaurant in Omaha. To me the banner looks like it was designed for the dog to wear so he/she might have be used to that. Was the dog also trained to stand still wearing the wig, hat, and glasses? Do you think the dog actually had the cigarette in his mouth, or was it “photoshopped” in later? I asked a coworker this question, and she assumed it was really in the dog’s mouth because she didn’t realize people have been manipulating images since the 1800’s. You can see a few examples of manipulated photos in the, “What did it really look like?” blog post.

I’ve saved the cutest photos until the end. The Butler County Gallery collection in Nebraska Memories contains photos taken by the professional photographer Harvey Boston. As you can see, many people had pictures taken with their dog.

Edwin Lyndon Ned May Jr

Edwin Lyndon “Ned” May, Jr.

Unknown child and dog

Unknown child and dog

Boy and dog

Boy and dog

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minnie Liebrecht and dog

Minnie Liebrecht and dog

Agnes Birkel

Agnes Birkel

Louis Fuller and dog

Louis Fuller and dog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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Friday Reads: Up to This Pointe by Jennifer Longo

 

Longo055Harper (17) and her best friend Kate have held to the plan for their futures since sixth grade: to become ballerinas and share an apartment in their home city of San Francisco. Then things fall apart. Kate is on her way to their dream, Harper is not. Her body cannot do what Kate can do. With her dream lost, Harper goes to Antarctica to “winter over” for six months as a research assistant (and to patch herself back together). Told in alternating chapters of “Antarctica” and “San Francisco” the book slowly reveals what Harper should have seen coming but chose to ignore. Booklist says, “An adventure story with lots of heart.”

I found this book interesting because Harper knew little about Antarctica or the science studies connected with wintering over, but she lucked into a lesser assistant position. The reader learns about Antarctica and what Harper’s strong points are as Harper learns them (though a couple of times I did want to whack her upside the head). Still, people have to learn in their own time and way – and that does happen for Harper. I liked that Harper was good at her job, organizing the scientist’s notes and data. Ultimately she is generous to an unlikable member of the winter over team.

An unusual setting for a teen novel, it features two people who were dedicated to their futures and approached them with unfailing intensity and effort.  To lose that would be devastating, and it does take Harper quite a while to move ahead.

Longo, Jennifer. Up to This Pointe. New York: Random House Books for Young Readers, 2016.

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Throwback Thursday: Tecumseh Carnegie Library

Tecumseh
Exterior photo of the Tecumseh, Nebraska Carnegie Library built in 1907.

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NCompass Live: Why Use Google Books?

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Why Use Google Books?”, on Wednesday, June 8, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Do your students need primary resources for a history project? Are the genealogists in your community trying to verify where an ancestor worked or lived between censuses? Is a local author writing a book set in 1908 searching for authentic details to include about work and leisure pursuits? Join us for a discussion on using the free resources in Google Books for these types of research projects and more.

Presenter: Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director, Nebraska Library Commission.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • June 15 – Passport to Vermont Libraries with Jessamyn West
  • June 29 – Innovating Access to Information with Libraries Without Borders

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld

eligibleYou may be familiar with Elizabeth Bennett and her sisters Jane, Mary, Kitty, and Lydia; their mother desperate to make them good matches, and their father smart enough to try to stay out of the way.  But what if Liz Bennett was a magazine writer, Jane a yoga instructor, Mary focused on her online degree, Kitty and Lydia into CrossFit, and the family lived in Cincinnati circa 2013?

Meet Curtis Sittenfeld’s 21st century Bennett family.  In this retelling, Liz and Jane have moved to New York City to pursue their careers, but the rest of the girls still live at home in Ohio, where Mr. and Mrs. Bennett belong to the local country club and ignore the decay of their Tudor home, their rapidly dwindling fortune, and the failing state of Mr. Bennett’s health.  After their father ends up hospitalized, the older daughters return home, and Mrs. Bennett wastes no time in trying to set up one of her girls with reality television star-slash-ER-doctor Chip Bingley.

While a romance blossoms between Chip and Jane, Liz finds herself fending off advances from tech-whiz Cousin Willie and trying to save her family members from themselves.  Enter neurosurgeon Fitzwilliam Darcy and…well, if you’ve read Pride and Prejudice, you already know how this one goes…

Sittenfeld, Curtis. Eligible. New York: Random House, 2016.

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New Government Publications Received at the Library Commission

Nebraska StatehoodNew state government publications have been received at the Nebraska Library Commission for May 2016.  Included are reports from the Nebraska Accountability and Disclosure Commission, the Nebraska Criminal Justice Partners, the Nebraska State Electrical Division,  Mid-America Transportation Center, and the University of Nebraska Press, to name a few.

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Throwback Thursday: Sutton Carnegie Library

Sutton

Exterior photo of the Sutton, Nebraska Carnegie Library built in 1910.

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The Data Dude: 2015 FY Data Now Available

Gold Guy Surfing On Business ReportsShaka. The 2015 public library survey data is now available on the NLC website. This is preliminary data (meaning that it has not yet been certified by IMLS) so keep in mind that it might be subject to change (but most likely it will not). There is also a data dashboard that summarizes the data. Thanks to all of you who submitted your statistics.

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Eleanor & Park to Represent Nebraska at National Book Festival

NCB logoFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
June 1, 2016

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Mary Jo Ryan
402-471-3434
800-307-2665

Eleanor & Park to Represent Nebraska at National Book Festival

The Nebraska Center for the Book selected Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2013) to represent Nebraska at the 2016 National Book Festival. The book is the state’s selection for the National Book Festival’s “Discover Great Places through Reading” brochure and map. Each state selects one book about the state, or by an author from the state, that is a good read for children or young adults. The brochure and map will be distributed at the Festival on September 24 and featured in the “Great Reads about Great Places” links on the websites of both the National and Nebraska Centers for the Book.

Set over the course of one school year, Eleanor & Park is the story of two star-crossed sixteen-year-olds—outsiders that meet on the school bus who are smart enough to know that first love almost never lasts, but are brave enough to try. Nebraska’s “Great Reads about Great Places” book is chosen from former Nebraska Book Award winners and this book was awarded the 2014 Nebraska Book Award in the Young Adult Fiction category. Entries for this year’s Nebraska Book Awards will be accepted until June 30—see http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/awards/nebookawards.html.

The National Book Festival will feature presentations by award-winning authors, poets, and illustrators at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC. Festival goers can meet their favorite authors, get books signed, have photos taken with mascots and storybook characters, and participate in a variety of learning activities. States will staff exhibit booths to promote reading, library programs, and literary events. Find out more about the 2016 National Book Festival (including a list of featured authors) at http://www.loc.gov/bookfest.

The Nebraska Center for the Book is housed at the Nebraska Library Commission and brings together the state’s readers, writers, booksellers, librarians, publishers, printers, educators, and scholars to build the community of the book, supporting programs to celebrate and stimulate public interest in books, reading, and the written word. The Nebraska Center for the Book is supported by the Nebraska Library Commission. As the state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services, bringing together people and information.

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.

 

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NCompass Live: The Librarian as Candidate: Activating Activists for Funding, and Election Day Outcomes

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “The Librarian as Candidate: Activating Activists for Funding, and Election Day Outcomes”, on Wednesday, June 1, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Are you looking for new ways to engage and activate advocates for your library? Join John Chrastka, Executive Director of EveryLibrary, to explore a range of innovative options to energize, focus, and improve your library advocacy efforts while learning how to put proven techniques that political campaigns use to reach voters to work. Come and learn how librarians who see themselves in a new, more politically savvy way recognize that they are “the candidate”. You’ll learn about tips and tools to market yourself to all your constituents – and not just users – that will help reframe your work in the eyes of the public and funders in a new way.

John will also talk about the work EveryLibrary did to support NLA and Nebraska libraries around LB969.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • June 8 – Why Use Google Books?
  • June 15 – Passport to Vermont Libraries with Jessamyn West
  • June 29 – Innovating Access to Information with Libraries Without Borders

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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