NCompass Live: Cardboard Conundrum: Why a Small University Library Has Grown a Monthly Board Game Night

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Cardboard Conundrum: Why a Small University Library Has Grown a Monthly Board Game Night”, on Wednesday, July 1, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

One Saturday each month about 50 people gather at Concordia University’s Link Library to play board games. That might sound banal in a higher education setting or Luddite in this age of ever-increasing technology. Since 1995, however, a grand renaissance in board game design is providing games that are intellectually stimulating, artistically engaging, educationally valuable, and socially exciting. Hear how a modern board game event in the library offers outreach to the students, faculty and community. Learn what resources we use to develop and promote the event. If you believe that fun has no place in the library, do not attend this session.

Presenter: Phil Hendrickson, Library Director, Link Library, Concordia University, Seward, NE.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • July 8 – Managing the Device Deluge – Training and Supporting Staff
  • July 22 – From the Basement to the West Wing: The Talking Book & Braille Service’s New Space

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

 

 

 

 

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Friday Reads: The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing, by Marie Kondo

kondobookI am pretty much what my grandmother used to call a “mess pot.” Despite dozens of bins, drawer organizers, labeled shelves, color-coded files, and all my good intentions, my place is mostly a jumble. So, hope springing eternal, when I heard about this book, I knew that I had to read it.

Yes, I was looking for a silver bullet—that one quick, easy, wonderful thing that would transform my life, or at least keep shoes from accumulating under the coffee table. Any book that offered “life changing magic,” well, it wasn’t a wand from Olivander’s, but I was ready to try it.

It’s a little book, didactic (perhaps the result of the translation from Japanese) and charming by turns. Taken literally, I thought it was kind of nuts. Ms. Kondo requires things to be done in very specific ways—and her ways wouldn’t necessarily fit with my mental processes or lifestyle. There are YouTube videos, and plenty of articles and reviews that illustrate. But the spirit of her advice resonated for me:

  • Decide what you are going to keep, don’t decide what you are going to discard.
  • Keep only those things that “spark joy.”
  • Many things are not meant for forever. If something’s time has passed, it’s okay to discard it.
  • Most papers can be thrown away.
  • Tackle organizing and purging by category of items, not by location.
  • Appreciate the things you have and care for them.
  • Store things in ways that make them easy to find and access.
  • Develop habits that make it easy to maintain orderliness.

I felt that the underlying message was to practice mindfulness, to not be overly materialistic, and to make sure that possessions were working for me, not burdening me. So for me, the attitudes were more valuable than the specific methods—although her way of folding and organizing an underwear drawer was pretty slick.

 

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Free Immigration Webinar

ImmigrationLogo2On July 2, 2015, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will host a free webinar for public librarians on the topic of immigration and U.S. citizenship. Join in to learn more about what resources are available to assist libraries in providing immigrant and adult education services. The webinar, Overview of myE-Verify, will explore a new online service for the general public. Representatives will be on hand to discuss how the service can be used to:

 

  • Confirm their work eligibility with Self Check
  • Create a myE-Verify account
  • Protect their Social Security number in E-Verify with Self Lock
  • Access myResources, a multimedia resource center to learn about their rights and their employer’s responsibilities.

Webinar Details:
Date: July 2, 2015
Time: 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. EDT
Click here to register

This series was developed as part of a partnership between IMLS and USCIS to ensure that librarians have the necessary tools and knowledge to refer their patrons to accurate and reliable sources of information on immigration-related topics. To find out more about the partnership and the webinar series, visit the Serving New Americans page of the IMLS website or on the USCIS website.

Posted in Education & Training, General, Information Resources, Library Management, Programming, Technology, Uncategorized, What's Up Doc / Govdocs | Leave a comment

Throwback Thursday: Bloomfield Carnegie Library

Bloomfield

Exterior photo of the Bloomfield, Nebraska Carnegie Library built in 1916.

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The Data Dude – IMLS Compare Tool

IMLSIMLS has recently updated the Compare Public Libraries and Search for Public Libraries tools with FY 2013 data. If you are looking for Nebraska library data, the best place is on the NLC website, in the data services section. Those statistical reports are available back to 1999. However, you might think that the Compare tool is a bit less relevant because it has FY 2013 data instead of the FY2014 Nebraska data. Keep in mind that IMLS has different groups of states that have different public library survey submission dates (so that all 50 states – plus U.S. territories) aren’t being submitted at the same time. The Compare tool is a great tool. It is easy to learn how to use and navigate just by operating it. One thing of importance is that this tool is valuable to identify your national peers. The Compare tool allows you to generate a report based on the factors reported in the survey, but one important one is the legal service population (LSA) of your library. To do this, first begin your search by finding your library. Next, click on “Choose Similar Libraries (Comparison Group) by Variable”. You can select any variable, but if you want LSA, click on the + sign next to Organizational Characteristics, then Population of Legal Service Area. I like Method 1, which defaults to 20%, but depending on your library a more realistic percentage is 5% or 3%. The Compare tool will then tell you how many libraries are in your comparison group. You can either add another variable, or if you just want the data for those libraries, click on Continue. On the next screen, expand each category you want data for (or you can select all of them). You can then look at the data from the libraries in your comparison group, or export it to an excel file from the link at the top. Shaka.

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Nebraska 125 Years Ago – Part 1

Lincoln Police Department, 1890The year was 1890 and Nebraska had officially been a state for 23 years. John Milton Thayer was Governor. The population of the state was 1.062 million but the population of Lincoln was just 55,154. Lincoln was being protected by Chief Melick and his fellow Lincoln police officers.

Nineteenth annual commencement of the University of NebraskaThe University of Nebraska held their Nineteenth annual commencement on June 11, 1890. The commencement was held at Funke’s Opera House which was located at the corner of 12th & O Streets in Lincoln. It had formerly been called Hallo’s Opera House and then Centennial Opera House. According to the commencement program the Governor attended the ceremony to present the military commissions.

Paving map of Omaha, NebraskaOmaha was also a lot smaller in 1890 with a population of 140,452. The city had a number of paved streets at this time as can be seen on this 1890 Paving map of Omaha, Nebraska. To get a better idea of the physical size of Omaha I studied the map looking for landmarks that are still present 125 years later. The east side of Omaha of course is easy to identify. On the North half of the map Cut Off Lake is clearly marked. If you don’t recognize that lake it may be because in 1906 the name was changed to Carter Lake. On the South half of the map the Missouri River is clearly marked. The northern edge of town is also fairly easy to identify. Towards the top of the North half of the map you can clearly see Fort Omaha. It’s located near where the top fold line and middle fold line on the map cross.

Paving map of Omaha, NebraskaThe south edge of town is also easy to identify. On the bottom right corner of the South half of the map is River View Park. If you don’t know the history of River View Park it is now the location of the Henry Doorly Zoo. Locating a present day landmark on the far west side of Omaha wasn’t as easy. Looking at the map you will see that there are very few of the north south streets are named and when are named they don’t always match up with current street names. On the South half of the map Hanscom Park is located at about the center of the map. The west side of the park runs along 32nd Ave. I’m guessing the west side of town ends around what is now 50th street.

Paving map of Omaha, NebraskaLooking at the map you can see that the streets of Omaha in 1890 were paved with a variety of different materials, including sheet asphalt, Sioux Falls granite, Colorado sandstone, Woodruff sandstone, Galesburg brick, cedar block, and cypress block. Looking at the area of 13th and Jones Street you can see that a variety of these options were used in this area. While the map does not label individual stores we know that Henry Moeller’s grocery store was located on the northwest corner of 13th and Jones.Henry Moeller's grocery store Looking at the picture I think the store faced Jones Street but unfortunately I can’t tell if that is Sioux Falls granite in front of the store.

Watch for Nebraska 125 Years Ago, Part 2 next week to see more of Nebraska and what it looked in 1890.

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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NCompass Live: Metadata Manipulations: Using MarcEdit and Open Refine to Enhance Technical Services Workflows

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Metadata Manipulations: Using MarcEdit and Open Refine to Enhance Technical Services Workflows”, on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Are you looking for ways to edit your catalog records more efficiently, transform your library data from one format to another, and easily detect misspellings and other inaccuracies in your metadata? MarcEdit and Open Refine are powerful tools that can help you deal with all of these issues. Emily Nimsakont, Head of Cataloging & Resource Management , Schmid Law Library, University of Nebraska – Lincoln, will show how you can harness the power of these tools to make your work easier.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • July 1 – Cardboard Conundrum: Why a Small University Library Has Grown a Monthly Board Game Night
  • July 8 – Managing the Device Deluge – Training and Supporting Staff
  • July 22 – From the Basement to the West Wing: The Talking Book & Braille Service’s New Space

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

 

 

 

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Friday Reads: Big Bad Love by Larry Brown

bigbadlove2Two of my favorite authors are Raymond Carver and Charles Bukowski. Both are blue collar writers who encapsulate the mundane, disturbing, hapless, and tragic parts of everyday lives. Often, there is a great deal of humor underneath or simultaneously with these tragedies. Until recently, I had no idea that there is a term for this style and type of writing. It’s called “dirty realism.” The writing focuses more on the pain and suffering rather than the warm and fuzzy; the unhappiness rather than the happy; the trivial rather than the substantive. Both Carver and Bukowski have a very distinctive L.A. feel; although Bukowski was more skid row than Carver. Listen to some Tom Waits while you read either and you’ll feel right at home (I’d recommend Frank’s Wild Years and/or Swordfishtrombones). Now, before I get to rambling (or to put an end to it here and now), this Friday Reads isn’t about Carver or Bukowski. The problem is that I’ve already read their stuff (they are both dead), and for years have been searching for something with a similar feel. I finally found it when I discovered Larry Brown. Unfortunately, Larry Brown also died in 2004, but since I have yet to read any of his stuff, I feel refreshed. Well, sort of.

Like much (if not all) of Carver’s work, Larry Brown’s Big Bad Love is a collection of short stories. There are similarities, but Brown lived in Oxford, Mississippi, so the stories have a different, non-California feel to them. The stories are written from a male perspective, filled with alcoholics, depression, and tales of dysfunctional or failed relationships. I found the stores to be relatable (on some levels) and often hilarious. There is, however, a fine line between laughing at another’s misery and laughing with them. I had the latter feeling. There is something to say about retaining your sense of humor during life’s tragedies, and I think Brown aptly captures that, at least in part 1. Part 2 of the book consists of a longer story. I wouldn’t even recommend reading it. Compared to part 1, it’s a bore. Here’s a quote from part 1 that provides a snippet of Brown’s style:

“I didn’t know why something that started off feeling so good had to wind up feeling so bad. Love was a big word and it covered a lot of territory. You could spend your whole life chasing after it and wind up with nothing, be an old bitter guy with long nose hair and ear hair and no teeth, hanging out in bars, looking for somebody your age, but the chances of success went down then. After a while you got too many strikes against you.”

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Focus on Nebraska authors: Jonis Agee

Omaha native Jonis Agee grew up in Nebraska and Missouri so they are often the settings for her novels. The New York Times Book Review called her “a gifted poet of that dark lushness in the heart of the American landscape.”  She is a Professor of English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and teaches creative writing and twentieth-century fiction. She earned her BA at the University of Iowa and her MA and PhD from the State University of New York at Binghamton.

Jonis has been awarded two Nebraska Book Awards for The Weight of Dreams and Acts of Love on Indigo Road and three of her books — Strange Angels, Bend This Heart, and Sweet Eyes — were named Notable Books of the Year by The New York Times. She is the co-writer, with her husband Brent Spencer, of the screenplays Full Throttle, Baghdad Rules and Everlasting.  Together they live on a small acreage north of Omaha in Ponca Hills. Of her five novels four are included in our book club collection:  The River Wife, Strange Angels, Sweet Eyes, and Weight of Dreams. In each she creates a strong sense of Midwestern place alongside compelling family dramas laced with grit. Please consider selecting one of Agee’s titles for your next book club selection.

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One Book, One Nebraska Selection Now Ready for Talking Book Borrowers

Death Zones and Darling Spies is now available at Talking Books

Death Zones and Darling Spies is now available at Talking Books.

The 2015 One Book, One Nebraska selection, Death Zones and Darling Spies: Seven Years of Vietnam Reporting, is now available on cartridge directly from the Talking Book and Braille Service (TBBS). Written by Beverly Deepe Keever and narrated in our studios by Judy Hanefeldt, the book can be ordered by TBBS borrowers as DBC 760. It can also be downloaded directly from BARD, a website hosted by the Library of Congress for talking book borrowers.The book is written by a Nebraska farm girl turned journalist who became the longest-serving American correspondent covering the Vietnam War. The author earned a Pulitzer Prize nomination. With compelling prose, Beverly Deepe Keever tells personal and human stories that are matched by her insights regarding the war’s political and military strategies. She draws form interviews with generals, politicians, American marines, captured North Vietnamese soldiers, Buddhist monks, and Viet Cong officials.

 

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GROW Nebraska Workshop July 2

sba-logoOmaha’s SCORE chapter will host GROW Nebraska for an informative small business workshop Thursday, July 2, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the SBA Nebraska District Office, 10675 Bedford Avenue, Suite 100, Omaha.  Janell Ehrke, CEO of GROW Nebraska, will explain how the non-profit organization connects entrepreneurs to the world marketplace.

GROW Nebraska provides entrepreneurial coaching and market access opportunities to its members, creating sustainable economic development for more than 350 small business members through promotions, market access and education. They offer more than 20 services, including initial consultations, counseling, product evaluation, and are on the cutting edge of social media marketing training.

GROW Nebraska also allows members to choose to participate in everything the organization offers, or just pay only for low-cost services that best suit them. Instead of forcing one-size-fits-all approaches on each small business client, GROW encourages its members to develop a plan that benefits their business the most.

There is no charge for the workshop, but please register by calling Marilyn Riley at the SCORE office at 402-221-3606 or email score@scoreomaha.org, as space is limited.

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Throwback Thursday: Blair Carnegie Library

Blair

Exterior photo of the Blair, Nebraska Carnegie Library, built in 1917.

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The Data Dude – Robots in the Library Makerspace

robot reading westportThe Dude has been on vacation (and after travelling with two kids ages 4 and 8, discovered that there are some pretty decent shows on Cartoon Network—favorites include Uncle Grandpa, the Regular Show, Steven Universe, and Teen Titans Go!), but wanted to share an article about the Westport Public Library in Westport, Connecticut. Two things caught the Dude’s attention: (1) The robust makerspace at this library – specifically, the acquisition and availability of robots; and (2) the possibilities for programming these robots, as evidenced by their Tai Chi demonstration. For the record, the Dude is a student of Chen style Tai Chi; it looks like the robots are programmed to do some type of Yang style. It’s not that one is necessarily better than the other, but there are differences. Nonetheless, it interestingly illustrates what can be done in this library’s makerspace. The draw to the robots is similar to the idea of libraries offering the CoderDojo, except in this instance you are programming the robot and not websites, games, and apps. These robots can speak 19 different languages. If you are considering expanding your makerspace offerings, check out the makerspace section of Westport’s website, complete with videos and a blog. Shaka.

Photo courtesy of Westport Public Library, Westport, CT.

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Friday Reads: The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell

imagesCAN6O13QThe Bone Clocks moves along quicker than The Cloud Atlas, by the same author, and seems to flow better, in my opinion. It begins in 1980 with Holly Sykes, a 15-year-old London girl, who has an ugly row with her mother, then the earth shattering betrayal by her older, illegal,  boyfriend and her best friend. Then she runs away.

But she can’t run away from the radio people. The paranormal entities that she’s been hearing and been in contact with much of her life. And she isn’t just hearing things. They’re real. The genius of this writer is that he’s writing perfectly fine real life coming of age story, war story, writer’s life story and then in walks the paranormal, and it’s not the one you think it’ll be from all your mystery or horror reading. Eventually you learn who the sides are. Both are immortal, One “eats” the gifted souls to live eternally, carnivores, or Anchorites. The other dies natural deaths and continues on, only if not killed unnaturally, the Horologists, following a script (as in a play.)

Slowly, we go through personal stories of each individual, with sudden steps into the paranormal. Each interweaves with the other, a 14-year-old girl, a war correspondent, a young con man, a literary writer, and more. Getting closer to an event of proportions we cannot guess. But it will change lives.

Review by William Skidelsky in the Gaurdian

Review by Derek Thompson in the Atlantic

 

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NCompass Live: NebraskAccess Expansion

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “NebraskAccess Expansion”, on Wednesday, June 17, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Join us for an overview of the new NebraskAccess database lineup available as of July 1st. New EBSCO databases include MasterFILE Complete, Primary Search, NoveList Plus, MyHeritage, Points of View Reference Center, Small Business Reference Center and Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection. EBSCO also offers a new search interface, Explora, available for schools and public libraries that will be previewed. Options for online training and face-to-face training will also be discussed.

The Nebraska Library Commission pays for statewide subscriptions to these databases providing access to all Nebraska libraries and residents at no cost to them. In addition to being a portal for statewide databases, NebraskAccess offers topical listings of websites selected by librarians.

Presenters: Devra Dragos, Allana Novotny, and Susan Knisely; Nebraska Library Commission.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • June 24 – Metadata Manipulations: Using MarcEdit and Open Refine to Enhance Technical Services Workflows
  • July 1 – Cardboard Conundrum: Why a Small University Library Has Grown a Monthly Board Game Night
  • July 8 – Manage the Device Deluge
  • July 22 – From the Basement to the West Wing: The Talking Book & Braille Service’s New Space

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

 

 

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What’s Sally Reading?

Get to Know the Nominees for Teens’ Top Ten 2015

The Hub has begun a four-part The Hub to highlight the 24 titles on the Teens’ Top Ten list for 2015.  The books were published between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2014.  You can see the entire list here if you want to check and see how many your library owns.  Teens from all over the country can vote for their favorite title beginning on August 15, 2015 and continue through Teen Read Week (October 18-24, 2015).  The ten titles receiving the most votes will be named the Teens’ Top Ten list for 2015.  I hope your teens will want to participate!

Vernon048Castle Hangnail by Ursula Vernon, who wrote the Dragonbreath series, introduces readers to new characters and setting, which could become a series as well.  Castle Hangnail has been without a master for far too long, and the main caretaker is worried it will be decommissioned.  Then Miss Molly, a 12-year-old witch arrives to claim the castle.  She does have an invitation (one of many sent out) but she seems so unorthodox, she’s nice (usually) and considerate, but she can do some magic.  She has four tasks to complete in order to claim the castle, maybe everything will work out.  Then, the sorceress who was the actual recipient of the invitation appears at the door; and she is nasty, just as the master of the castle should be.  But the minions in the castle rather like Miss Molly, what should they do?

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

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Juan Felipe Herrera named new U.S. Poet Laureate

The Librarian of Congress announced the appointment yesterday.  Herrera will start in the fall, participating in the National Book Festival on September 5 and presenting a reading of his work in Washington D.C. on September 15.  Herrera, the first Hispanic Poet Laureate, is the author of 28 books of poetry, novels for young adults and collections for children.  See further information about him here.

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Throwback Thursday: Beatrice Carnegie Library

Beatrice

Exterior photo of the Beatrice, Nebraska Carnegie Library, built in 1904.

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The Data Dude – Wednesday Watch – Rectify

rectify logoRecently, one of the Dude’s colleagues here at the Commission conveyed a quote from Oscar Aviles, the warden for the Hudson County, NJ jail. Warden Aviles used to believe that his job was limited to keeping the jail safe; regarding rehabilitation and re-entry programs for inmates, he said: “That’s not my problem. This is somebody else’s problem.” He no longer thinks this way. In other institutions, the end of this line of thinking is long overdue. The Dude thinks libraries have the potential to play a large and important role in that (and are often underutilized by administrators).

Those of you who know the Dude are aware that he used to work in a correctional facility library. During the time there, the Dude had an inmate who worked with him for almost the entire 9 years. This particular guy told the Dude about an original series show on Sundance TV (owned by AMC Networks) called Rectify. Now, don’t get this confused with Justify. The sound alike, but are two entirely different animals. Justify is a show on FX starring Timothy Olyphant (who also played Sheriff Seth Bullock in the fantastic HBO series Deadwood). In Justify, Olyphant plays Raylan Givens, a no-nonsense U.S. Marshall who returns to his hometown in Kentucky. It’s a sound series, but today’s column is about Rectify. Anyway, this particular inmate told the Dude that by far Rectify absolutely nails the feeling that a person has when they are released from prison. The story of Rectify begins with the main character, Daniel Holden (played by Aden Young) being released from Georgia’s death row after 19 years. He went to death row at the age of 18 for the rape and murder of his 16 year old girlfriend. He confessed to the crime, but there is a lot of doubt about whether or not the confession was coerced. DNA evidence frees him from death row, but it doesn’t necessarily exonerate him. Many in the local community still believe he is guilty, and as the viewer, we really don’t know (at least after two seasons). The first six episodes cover the first six days after his release from prison. Flashbacks tell part of the story of the days during his incarceration. The main thing about Rectify, the thing that the inmate who worked with me in the library wanted to convey, is that it appropriately captures some of the experiences and struggles of prison life, and also the huge challenges of transition back into society (especially after being locked up for 19 years). The subplot (although as the series develops it becomes more and more relevant) is finding out what actually happened on the night of the murder, and the depth of the involvement of the main character, Daniel Holden. But that really is a subplot, at least in the first two seasons.

You might look at the summary of Rectify and believe it’s just another ho-hum cliché of whodunnit, but it is really much more than that. Both season 1 and season 2 are available on DVD. Season 3 is scheduled to begin on July 9, 2015. Since the Dude has no cable, he will need to wait for the DVD or the Netflix streams to get caught up with season 3. According to Firstsearch, no Nebraska libraries (that’s zero, nada) have Rectify on DVD. A number of libraries in neighboring states have it, however, and 289 libraries worldwide. Shaka.

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Simpson’s Sheep Won’t Go to Sleep! to Represent Nebraska at National Book Festival

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: NCB logo
June 9, 2015

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Mary Jo Ryan
402-471-3434
800-307-2665

Simpson’s Sheep Won’t Go to Sleep! to Represent Nebraska at National Book Festival

The Nebraska Center for the Book selected Simpson’s Sheep Won’t Go to Sleep! by Bruce Arant (Peter Pauper Press, Inc., 2013) to represent Nebraska at the 2015 National Book Festival. The book is the state’s selection for the National Book Festival’s “Discover Great Places through Reading” map. Each state selects one book about the state, or by an author from the state, that is a good read for children or young adults. The map will be distributed at the Festival on September 5 and listed in “Great Reads about Great Places” on the websites of both the National and Nebraska Centers for the Book.

Will poor Farmer Simpson ever find a way to lull his sheep to sleep? Illustrated with soft pastel drawings, Simpson’s Sheep Won’t Go to Sleep! is a story for every parent or grandparent who has put a child to bed—and every child who has creatively resisted. The selection was awarded the 2014 Nebraska Book Award in the Children’s category. NOTE: Entries for the 2015 Nebraska Book Awards will be accepted until June 30—see http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/awards/nebookawards.html.

The National Book Festival will feature award-winning authors, poets, and illustrators at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC. Festival goers can meet their favorite authors, get books signed, have photos taken with mascots and storybook characters, and participate in a variety of learning activities. States will staff exhibit booths to promote reading, library programs, and literary events.

The Nebraska Center for the Book is housed at the Nebraska Library Commission and brings together the state’s readers, writers, booksellers, librarians, publishers, printers, educators, and scholars to build the community of the book, supporting programs to celebrate and stimulate public interest in books, reading, and the written word. The Nebraska Center for the Book is supported by the Nebraska Library Commission. As the state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services, bringing together people and information.

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.

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