NCompass Live: The Librarian as Candidate: Activating Activists for Funding, and Election Day Outcomes

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “The Librarian as Candidate: Activating Activists for Funding, and Election Day Outcomes”, on Wednesday, June 1, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Are you looking for new ways to engage and activate advocates for your library? Join John Chrastka, Executive Director of EveryLibrary, to explore a range of innovative options to energize, focus, and improve your library advocacy efforts while learning how to put proven techniques that political campaigns use to reach voters to work. Come and learn how librarians who see themselves in a new, more politically savvy way recognize that they are “the candidate”. You’ll learn about tips and tools to market yourself to all your constituents – and not just users – that will help reframe your work in the eyes of the public and funders in a new way.

John will also talk about the work EveryLibrary did to support NLA and Nebraska libraries around LB969.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • June 8 – Why Use Google Books?
  • June 15 – Passport to Vermont Libraries with Jessamyn West
  • June 29 – Innovating Access to Information with Libraries Without Borders

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: The Reckoners (series)

Action! Adventure! Supervillains!

An unknown Calamity has caused certain people to develop all sorts of extraordinary superpowers. With their new abilities, these Epics have also become quite corrupted and seemingly invincible. Using their powers for destruction and control, the world has become fractured with people living under the Epics’ rule. The good guys are a small band of ordinary people called the Reckoners who are fighting back against the Epics with the help of Prof and his fantastic technology.

The series begins with our scrappy (and sometimes awkward) protagonist, David, in his obsessive quest to join the Reckoners and take down one of the most powerful Epics, Steelheart, who killed his father ten years earlier. Twists and turns move the story along very quickly as David and the Reckoners face the war that they’re about to start.

In all of his writing, Brandon Sanderson’s world-building and magic (or superpower) systems are incredible. He’s a favorite. I haven’t listened to any of the audiobook versions, but according to other reviews, MacLeod Andrews does a wonderful job with narration.

Random House Kids. (2013, September 5). Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson. [Video file]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/6sC9NtpXLH4

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Throwback Thursday: Superior Carnegie Library

Superior Interior

Interior photo of the Superior, Nebraska Carnegie Library built in 1909.

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Free to Depositories : Updated SuDoc Classification Chart Poster

FDLP

 

Many Federal depository libraries display the handy, “How to Locate a U.S. Government Publication” poster near their FDLP collection. It guides patrons in navigating U.S. Government resources that are arranged by Superintendent of Documents classification number.

This poster has been updated and is now available for free ordering by Federal depository libraries. Please discard any old versions of this poster, as they now contain outdated information.

The new posters are 11 X 17 and are made of durable paperboard. Please login to FDLP.gov, and order your library’s posters today (limit 5 posters per depository).

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Free Webinar : Consumer Financial Protection Bureau — Your Money, Your Goals

cfpb_bullseyeA live training webinar, “CFPB: Your Money, Your Goals,” will be presented on Wednesday, June 15, 2016.

Register today for “CFPB: Your Money, Your Goals

The webinar is free, however registration is required. Upon registering, a confirmation email will be sent to you. This registration confirmation email includes the instructions for joining the webinar.

Registration confirmations will be sent from sqldba@icohere.com. To ensure delivery of registration confirmations, registrants should configure junk mail or spam filter(s) to permit messages from that email address. If you do not receive the confirmation, please notify GPO.

  • Date:  June 15, 2016
  • Start time: 2:00 p.m. (Eastern)
  • Duration:  60 minutes
  • Speaker:  Patty Avery, Financial Empowerment Specialist, Office of Financial Empowerment, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB)
  • Description: Learn about “Your Money, Your Goals,” a toolkit to help front line staff and volunteers to help people set goals, choose financial products, and build skills in managing money, credit, and debt. “Your Money, Your Goals” is designed to address different settings in which people or organizations work with consumers.
  • Expected level of knowledge for participants: No prerequisite knowledge required

Closed captioning will be available for this webinar.

GPO’s eLearning platform presents webinars using WebEx. In order to attend or present at a GPO-hosted webinar, a WebEx plug-in must be installed in your internet browser(s). Download instructions.

Visit FDLP Academy for access to FDLP educational and training resources. All are encouraged to share and re-post information about this free training opportunity.

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IdentityTheft.gov : Recovering from identity theft is easier with a plan…

IdentityTheft.govWhere do identity theft victims turn for help?  For many, it’s the same place they turn whenever they’re stumped — their local library.  They know a librarian will find the right resource to help them recover from a crime that affects millions of people every year.  IdentityTheft.gov is that resource, a free government site to report identity theft to the Federal Trade Commission, build a step-by-step personalized recovery plan, and put that plan into action.

 

How it works:

Go to IdentityTheft.gov and answer some questions about what happened.  The site will:

  1. Build your customized recovery plan
  2. Walk you through each recovery step
  3. Track your progress and adapt to your changing situation
  4. Pre-fill letters and forms that you can use to deal with businesses, debt collectors, and even the IRS.

How libraries can use IdentityTheft.gov:

  1. Use it to give your patrons advice.  If your library has a secure network, help them report the theft and and open an account.  If not, give them an IdentityTheft.gov fact sheet and suggest they visit the site from a secure network or using their mobile phone’s cellular data.
  2. Order free bookmarks and factsheets!  Visit FTC.gov Bulkorder and order as many bookmarks and fact sheets as you need for FREE.
  3. Visit FTC.gov/libraries.  Get more consumer tips and tools; they’re free and in the public domain.  You can use the content in your library’s newsletters, share them online, and even put your library’s logo and branding on them.

Please use these materials to empower yourself and your community to fight back against identity theft!

 

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History of Armed Forces Day

ArmedForces DayThis past Saturday, May 21st was Armed Forces Day.   In the United States, Armed Forces Day is celebrated on the third Saturday in May. It falls near the end of Armed Forces Week, which begins on the second Saturday of May and ends on the third Sunday of May (the fourth if the month begins on a Sunday, as in 2016).

President Harry S. Truman led the effort to establish a single holiday for citizens to come together and thank our military members for their patriotic service in support of our country.  First observed on 20 May 1950, the day was created on 31 August 1949 by Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson, to honor Americans serving in the five U.S. military branches – the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Air Force and U.S. Coast Guard – following the consolidation of the military services in the U.S. Department of Defense. It was intended to replace the separate Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard Days, but the separate days are still observed, especially within the respective services.

The first Armed Forces Day was celebrated by parades, open houses, receptions and air shows. The United States’ longest continuously running Armed Forces Day Parade is held in Chattanooga, Tennessee. In 2016, Chattanooga celebrated the 67th year of the Armed Forces Day Parade, which also began in 1950.

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NCompass Live: Creating a Blended Learning Space in Your Library

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Creating a Blended Learning Space in Your Library”, on Wednesday, May 25, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

As Blended Learning environments become more commonplace in school classrooms, school librarians are taking on the look as well. What strategies and methods can be utilized to create that personalized learning space? Learning about how Nebraska’s Blended Learning Initiative can be part of your library.

Presenter: Beth Kabes, Media & Distance Learning Coordinator, ESU7.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • June 1 – The Librarian as Candidate: Activating Activists for Funding, and Election Day Outcomes – Details
  • June 8 – Why Use Google Books?
  • June 15 – Passport to Vermont Libraries with Jessamyn West
  • June 29 – Innovating Access to Information with Libraries Without Borders

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: The Fold, by Peter Clines

The FoldThey tried to create a teleportation machine (a transporter, if you’re familiar with Star Trek), but after much study, came to the realization the present technology can’t support the theory. So they moved the project and attempted a different approach.   This team of  DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) scientists in the California desert who believe they have created a portal that “folds” dimensions so a traveler may move hundreds of miles with one step. At budget time the agencies involved aren’t getting the information they believe they should. And even the head of their project in Washington is getting some odd vibes from the group, so he sends his own form of investigative team in to check on everything. A high school English teacher, Leland “Mike” Erikson, who looks like Servius Snape, college edition.

Mike, as he prefers to be known, had an eidetic memory, and an extremely high IQ. The combination makes him a perfect fit for the  Sherlock Holmes role. Mike is interesting, and the way he handles his memory makes the concept approachable. It also adds an interesting dimension to some of the things we take for granted, like forgetting painful experiences, and the immediacy of grief.

And yet, even for Mike, it’s hard to see what’s wrong with the Albuquerque Door, as they’ve named this machine that fold space. There have been nearly 400 human tests, without an injury. “Nine people, two hundred and sixteen rats, six cats, and a chimpanzee,” (p.49) have been through the door, and not one lost. And yet all the scientists, engineers, and programmers, who have been the test subjects are uneasy, and want to continue to do tests. Until something does go wrong. Of course, it goes so badly wrong that everyone is stunned, and someone dies.  This group is small, again, just six people, who outsource for medical or any other services.

Oh, yes the secret comes out, and the situation goes downhill fast. This becomes on of those Nantucket sleigh rides, and with very interesting twists. Just as you think you understand what’s going on, Mr. Clines throws you a curve, some from left field. And in the end, some logic, luck, and fast thinking saves the day. Just not neatly, cleanly, and with some odds and ends.

It is definitely an adult work of Science Fiction, Fantasy/Horror, some parts are not for the squeamish, and it is thriller territory. But it is a fun, and satisfying read, with quips, humor, and interesting characters.

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School librarian’s workshop: federal government resources for K-12

ben-logoA live training webinar, School Librarian’s Workshop: Federal Government Resources for K-12 / Taller para maestros de español: Recursos de gobierno federal para niveles K-12,” will be presented on Tuesday, May 31, 2016.

Click here to register!

  • Start time: 2:00 p.m. (Eastern), 1:00 (Central)
  • Duration: 60 minutes
  • Speaker: Jane Canfield, Coordinator of Federal Documents, Pontifical Catholic University of Puerto Rico
  • Learning outcomes: Are you a school librarian? Do you work with school librarians or children? The School Librarian’s Workshop will provide useful information for grades K-12, including Ben’s Guide to the U.S. Government and Kids.gov. The webinar will explore specific agency sites which provide information, in English and Spanish, appropriate for elementary and secondary school students. Teachers and school librarians will discover information on Federal laws and regulations and learn about resources for best practices in the classroom.
  • Expected level of knowledge for participants: No prerequisite knowledge required.

Closed captioning will be available for this webinar.

The webinar is free, however registration is required. Upon registering, a confirmation email will be sent to you. This registration confirmation email includes the instructions for joining the webinar.

Registration confirmations will be sent from sqldba[at]icohere.com. To ensure delivery of registration confirmations, registrants should configure junk mail or spam filter(s) to permit messages from that email address. If you do not receive the confirmation, please notify GPO.

GPO’s eLearning platform presents webinars using WebEx. In order to attend or present at a GPO-hosted webinar, a WebEx plug-in must be installed in your internet browser(s). Download instructions.

Visit FDLP Academy for access to FDLP educational and training resources. All are encouraged to share and re-post information about this free training opportunity.

Posted in Education & Training, General, Information Resources, Library Management, Programming, Uncategorized, What's Up Doc / Govdocs | Leave a comment

Throwback Thursday: Superior Carnegie Library

Superior

Exterior photo of the Superior, Nebraska Carnegie Library built in 1909.

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Webinar — Increasing Veterans’ Access with eBenefits

VAlogoA live training webinar, “Increasing Veterans’ Access with eBenefits,” will be presented on Thursday, June 16, 2016.

Register today for “Increasing Veterans’ Access with eBenefits

 

 

 

  • Date: Thursday, June 16, 2016
  • Start time: 2:00 p.m. (Eastern), 1:00 (Central)
  • Duration: 60 minutes
  • Speaker: Zorina Pritchett, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)
  • Description: Would you like to do more to help veterans? Learn the basics of the Department of Veterans Affairs’ eBenefits web portal, which allows veterans, service members, and eligible dependents to directly access VA benefits and services. Understanding eBenefits will allow you to assist eligible users in accessing the portal so they can effectively manage their VA benefits and military information. This webinar will present an overview of the eBenefits registration, basic navigation, reference contacts, and key resources.
  • Expected level of knowledge for participants: No prerequisite knowledge required

Closed captioning will be provided for this webinar.

The webinar is free, however registration is required. Upon registering, a confirmation email will be sent to you. This registration confirmation email includes the instructions for joining the webinar.

Registration confirmations will be sent from sqldba @ icohere.com. To ensure delivery of registration confirmations, registrants should configure junk mail or spam filter(s) to permit messages from that email address. If you do not receive the confirmation, please notify GPO.

GPO’s eLearning platform presents webinars using WebEx. In order to attend or present at a GPO-hosted webinar, a WebEx plug-in must be installed in your internet browser(s). Download instructions.

Visit FDLP Academy for access to FDLP educational and training resources. All are encouraged to share and re-post information about this free training opportunity with others.

Posted in Education & Training, General, Information Resources, Library Management, Programming, Technology, Uncategorized, What's Up Doc / Govdocs | Leave a comment

Webinar — The Outreach Bridge to Engaging Latino and Spanish-speaking Families

WebJunction-logoThis webinar presents strategies for library outreach to and engagement with Latino and Spanish-speaking communities, laying the groundwork for successful programming.

If you want to attract Latino and Spanish-speaking families to your library, the instinct is to launch a bilingual or Spanish-language storytime. It’s the “if we build it, they will come” logic for attracting community members who are not being served by the library. Libraries may be disappointed to discover that it doesn’t necessarily work that way. In this webinar, recognize the critical role that outreach plays in bridging the gap between Latino and Spanish-speaking families and library services. Hear real-world examples of outreach strategies from librarians who successfully connected with their Latino and Spanish-speaking communities, and learn a basic outreach process that you can adapt for your own community.

Presented by: Katie Scherrer, Connected Communities, consultant and co-author of Once Upon a Cuento: Bilingual Storytime in English and Spanish; and Lauren Simon, Community Librarian, Tualatin Public Library

Related Resources:

Register to attend

Date:  July 7th, 2016

Time: 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM Eastern, 2:00 PM — 3:00 PM Central

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Helping Schools Ensure the Civil Rights of Transgender Students… U.S. Department of Education: Examples of Policies and Emerging Practices for Supporting Transgender Students

DEdlogoThe U.S. Department of Education is committed to providing schools with the information they need to provide a safe, supportive, and nondiscriminatory learning environment for all students. It has come to the Department’s attention that many transgender students (i.e., students whose gender identity is different from the sex they were assigned at birth) report feeling unsafe and experiencing verbal and physical harassment or assault in school, and that these students may perform worse academically when they are harassed. School administrators, educators, students, and parents are asking questions about how to support transgender students and have requested clarity from the Department of Education. In response, ED has developed Examples of Policies and Emerging Practices for Supporting Transgender Students.
To see, and/or print this 25 page report, click on the title above.
Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training, General, Information Resources, Library Management, Programming, Uncategorized, What's Up Doc / Govdocs | Leave a comment

The Data Dude on Public Library Survey Completion

Gold Guy Surfing On Business ReportsShaka. Thanks again to all of you who submitted your public library survey via Bibliostat, and to those unaccredited libraries who submitted the survey on paper, answering the federally required questions. Our data has been submitted to IMLS, and as soon as some cleanup occurs, the full data set will be available on our website. Our response rate jumped a bit this year, up to 89%. For those of you who might be new to the survey, now would be the time to start collecting your statistics for next year’s reporting cycle, which begins mid-November. If you are a new director, take a look at our guide for new directors. If you are one of those unaccredited libraries who responded to the survey on paper, if those statistics are submitted online next cycle, you will be eligible for a Dollar$ for Data grant payment.

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NEST 529, College Savings Plan Scholarships!

We are excited the NEST 529 contest continues for this year’s summer reading program. It is the opportunity for children and teens, ages 3-18, to have their names entered into a drawing for a $529 scholarship. Fifteen names will be drawn, five each from our three Congressional Districts.  In order to be included in the drawing, children and teens need to complete their library’s summer reading program, as determined by each individual public library.  Additionally, each winner’s home library will receive $250.

Information, Official Rules, and a sample file for name submissions can be found here.

Instructions included on Tab 1 of the sample submission file are:

  • Please inform parents or guardians of the library’s intention to submit the children’s names for the drawing.  The parent or guardian has the right to exclude their child from the drawing.
  • Print out and post the Official Rules for the NEST 529 drawing.
  • As stated in the Official Rules — “Eligibility: Participation is open only to individual, legal Nebraska residents 3 to 18 years of age as of the date of entry.”
  • Include a phone number &/or email address to contact each child/teen. (Space for these is included on Tab 2 of the Excel file designed for submission.)
  • Libraries must submit contestant information electronically to the Library Commission.
  • If you do not have Excel or another spreadsheet program, send us the names electronically in an email.
  • In order to receive the scholarship, after the drawing the parents of the winners must agree to establish a 529 College savings account.
  • Email the completed file to Sally Snyder by the Deadline of 11:59:59 p.m., CT, on August 25, 2016.
  • Visit this Library Commission web page for links to the complete rules and a poster to display in your library.

Have a fun summer!

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NCompass Live: University of Nebraska Press Collection at the Nebraska Library Commission

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “University of Nebraska Press Collection at the Nebraska Library Commission”, on Wednesday, May 18, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Mary Sauers and Allison Badger, from the Nebraska Library Commission, will be talking about the history of the University of Nebraska Press, a history of Nebraska Press books at the Nebraska Library Commission, and many examples of the wide variety of titles in our collection. They will also talk about the monthly blog posts showcasing individual state documents and new NE Press books.

Presenters: Mary Sauers, Government Information Services Librarian, and Allison Badger, Cataloging Librarian, Nebraska Library Commission.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • May 25 – Creating a Blended Learning Space in Your Library
  • June 1 – The Librarian as Candidate: Activating Activists for Funding, and Election Day Outcomes – Details
  • June 8 – Why Use Google Books?
  • June 15 – Passport to Vermont Libraries
  • June 29 – Innovating Access to Information with Libraries Without Borders

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training | Leave a comment

Friday Reads: The Disaster Artist, by Greg Sestero & Tom Bissell

tdaNo one would seek out a bad meal. If you heard a friend rant about an awful vacation, you wouldn’t check prices for the next flight there. But art is different: it can entertain and stimulate even when it fails to accomplish its goals. Sometimes especially when it fails. “Bad art” is not always bad—under the right conditions, it can be sublime. And if it’s entertaining, is it really bad?

The Room has been called “the Citizen Kane of bad movies”. Written and directed by Tommy Wiseau, a shadowy character of unknown origin, the film is essentially a tragic love triangle involving a banker, his unfaithful fiancée, and the banker’s best friend. It seems to be standard fare, but The Room delivers this routine story through a narrative that’s full of quickly-dropped disease and drug subplots, continuity errors, and astonishingly incoherent dialogue (“You don’t understand anything, man! Leave your stupid comments in your pocket!”). If aliens who had never interacted with humans tried to stage an episode of Melrose Place, it would feel like The Room. One early review described it as “like getting stabbed in the head.” Some films leave you with questions about existence, ethics, art—the first question that comes to mind after viewing The Room is “how could this happen?”

This book explains how. Some things are outlined in more detail than others, as Sestero respects Wiseau’s famous reluctance to discuss his past. In fact, the book’s strongest moments capture the friendship between Sestero and Wiseau. I was concerned that The Disaster Artist would be full of jabs at Wiseau’s hubris and that sometimes happens, but the book generally presents him as a sometimes kind and warm, if very naïve and very, very strange, person. It’s rather analogous to the Tim Burton biopic about Ed Wood in its loving treatment of an outsider. And it’s surprisingly well-written, given that it’s ostensibly a book about a baffling cult film. The narrative is split between Sestero’s real life adventures with Wiseau and a day-by-day account of the film’s production, but its back-and-forth structure never becomes confusing. Unlike The Room itself.

It’s the perfect time to see The Room and read this book, as there are two related films set to be released this year—a mockumentary starring most of the original cast and a posh studio adaptation of The Disaster Artist featuring Bryan Cranston and Sharon Stone, among others. You will probably never surpass me in terms of Room fandom (so don’t worry), but you will be ahead of the curve if 2016 turns out to be a year of Room fever. And you will also know all about the flying vampire car that didn’t make into the final version of the film. Yes, really.

In my opinion, a bad film is a boring film (oh, hi, The English Patient). The Room and its brethren (like Troll II and Dunyayi Kurtaran Adam) are endlessly entertaining and rewatchable. The Disaster Artist captures the energy and atmosphere that make these films unique. They’re surreal and special. Not bad.

Sestero, G., & Bissell, T. The disaster artist: My life inside The Room, the greatest bad movie ever made.

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What’s Sally Reading?

A Great Resource: Disability in Kidlit

The Disability in Kidlit web page offers the opportunity to look beyond stereotypes to the reality of disabilities. The “About” section on their web page states, “Disability in Kidlit is dedicated to discussing the portrayal of disability in middle grade and young adult literature. We publish articles, reviews, interviews, and discussions examining this topic from various angles—and always from the disabled perspective.”

The book reviews presented on the site are of titles that feature a child or teen with a disability, reviewed by people who often also have that disability, to give librarians and others a better idea of what to look for when selecting books for their collections or recommending titles for readers.

Heling062Clothesline Clues to Sports People Play by Kathryn Heling & Deborah Hembrook will draw in young listeners during story time.  Each two-page spread features a clothesline holding things like a shirt, shorts, maybe gloves, a hat, or such, with an item or two on the ground that correspond to a particular sport.  It then asks “What sport does he (or she) play?”  The kids will shout the answer, and the next page also tells the answer.  This is a title I missed for my 2016 summer reading program booklist so I am happy to let you know about it now.  An earlier title by the same authors and illustrator is Clothesline Clues to Jobs People Do, which I also recommend.  Thank you to Sandy at Lincoln City Libraries for bringing these books to my attention.

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

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Throwback Thursday: Stanton Carnegie Library

Stanton

Exterior photo of the Stanton, Nebraska Carnegie Library built in 1915.

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