Register Now for Summer and Fall LIS Classes at Central Community College

Library and Information Services (LIS) class registration is now open at Central Community College for Summer 2018: May 21, 2018 – July 26, 2018 and August 20, 2018 – December 14, 2018.

Classes include:

Summer 2018

  • Reference Resources and Services, with Marty Magee, Instructor. This course covers use of print and digital resources, professional competencies, and the reference interview.

Fall 2018

  • Foundations of Library and Information Services, with Marty Magee, Instructor. This course provides introductory information in multiple areas including the history of libraries, foundational principles, databases and websites, library technology use, programming, and changing library roles.
  • Leadership and Management in Library and Information Agencies, with Michael Straatmann, Instructor. This course includes the theories, concepts and activities integral to leading and managing 21st Century libraries and information agencies.
  • Library and Information Services Capstone Practicum, with Patty Birch, Instructor. In this  final course in the LIS program, students complete 40 hours of service learning in a host library and review learning from the LIS program.

For information concerning Admissions or Registration, contact: Dee Johnson djohnson@cccneb.edu, 402-562-1418 or Toll Free at 877-222-0780

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NCompass Live: Introducing the Nebraska Authors Database!

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘Introducing the Nebraska Authors Database!’, on Wednesday, April 25, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

NebraskaAuthors.org launches on April 22, 2018! This broadly inclusive database holds the biographical information and bibliographies of more than 4,300 Nebraska authors, past and present. The website is the creation of a collaborative effort between Lincoln City Libraries, the UNL Center for Digital Research in the Humanities, and the Nebraska Literary Heritage Association. Learn the features of this database to enhance your knowledge of Nebraska Writers and to understand how this valuable resource can support the reference services at your library.

Presenter: Erin Willis, Curator, Jane Pope Geske Heritage Room of Nebraska Authors, Bennett Martin Public Library, Lincoln City Libraries.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • May 2 – Your Partners in Service: Accessing UNL Libraries Resources
  • May 9 – Computers in Libraries 2018
  • May 16 – 2018 One Book One Nebraska: Nebraska Presence: An Anthology of Poetry
  • May 23 – Big-Time Library Support in Small Towns
  • May 30 – Library Innovation Studios – A Project Update and Review of the Application Process
  • June 20 – Rising to the Challenge: Using the Aspen Institute Report and Action Guide for Strategic Planning

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: Night School by Lee Child

A member of my book group recently had us read Night School, the 21st entry in Lee Child’s very successful Jack Reacher series. While I’ve often felt it can be more difficult to have good conversations about genre titles, I’m happy to report we found plenty to discuss.

If you are a Lee Child reader, you know that the books feature Jack Reacher – a loner, drifting from place to place after mustering out of the Army in 1997 with the rank of Major.  He does not own a home, possess a driver’s license, or collect federal benefits. The only item typically in his possession is a toothbrush and he never carries luggage of any sort.  In Night School, Child resets the clock and places Reacher back in the army as a military policeman – part of the fictional 110th Special Investigations Unit formed to handle exceptionally difficult cases. The book begins with Reacher receiving an award for completing a successful covert operation in the morning, and by the afternoon, he’s reporting to night school.

His classmates include an FBI agent and a CIA analyst, both of whom also recently completed successful covert operations. Wondering what this school is about they receive the following background briefing: “[A] Jihadist sleeper cell in Hamburg, Germany, has received an unexpected visitor—a Saudi courier, seeking safe haven while waiting to rendezvous with persons unknown. A CIA asset, undercover inside the cell, has overheard the courier whisper a chilling message: The American wants a hundred million dollars.” From here, we follow Reacher and his classmates trying to determine what could be worth a hundred million dollars.

On the Lee Child website, I found an article by Stav Sherez entitled “Five reasons why the Jack Reacher novels are brilliant.” The fact is that even though the books are hugely popular, they often fail to garner much critical respect –as is often the case with series, genre books. The most discussable point of the article for me was that “…the Reacher books are Westerns in disguise and this goes a long way to explaining why they are so phenomenally popular…. Reacher is the classic silent stranger who rides into town and saves the small folk from rapacious bullies.” I would have never thought of Child’s books as westerns, but endings where justice is served are always satisfying.

I asked my group if reading this series in order was essential and the answer was no.  Each book could be a standalone because each is uniquely episodic and Reacher’s personal life does not change or progress dramatically from title to title. Similarly, plots for the Jack Reacher movies starring Tom Cruise have been cherry picked from the series based on those most suitable for cinema (One Shot #9 and Never Go Back #18), as opposed to series order.  We also discussed why people read series (and why some do not) and overwhelmingly series reader do not want to leave the character when others are perfectly happy to do so. When I asked if Jack Reacher could be someone they knew, all of the readers of the series said – he is real to me. As long as Lee Child continues to write, Jack Reacher remains safely in our group of literary friends.

Child, Lee. Night School. New York: Delacorte Press, 2016

 

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#BookFaceFriday “Three Versions of the Truth”

This week’s #BookFaceFriday will blow you away!

BookFace "Three Versions of the Truth"

Hang on to your hats, or umbrellas, just like a windy Nebraska spring, this #BookFace has us barely hanging on. A collection of short stories, this week’s selection is by Nebraska author Amy Knox Brown,Three Versions of the Truth” (Press 53, 2007). This book is a part of our NLC Book Club Kit collection, reserve this collection of short stories for your book club today!

“Her characters are alive and compelling; each story is a satisfying world to be entered and explored. Ms. Brown’s native Nebraskan landscape flourishes on these pages —descriptions you want to read slowly and then again.” —Jill McCorkle

This week’s #BookFace model is Holly Duggan, NLC’s Continuing Education Coordinator!

Love this #BookFace & reading? We suggest checking out all the titles available for book clubs at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/ref/bookclub. Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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NLA Spring Meetings Across Nebraska

Today I attended the Nebraska Library Association (NLA) Public Library and Trustee Section (PLTS), School Children’s and Young People’s Section (SCYP), and Paraprofessional Section Spring Meeting in Seward. And I’m learning so much from David Drozd, University of Nebraska Omaha (UNO) Center for Public Affairs Research, about how to use the census data website. I can really see how this would be very useful for lots of libraries across the state. NOTE: there’s still time to catch his workshop at the remaining Spring Meeting sessions tomorrow and next week. See http://nlc.nebraska.gov/scripts/calendar/eventlist.asp?mode=search&search=NLA%20Spring%20Meeting for locations. If you can’t attend one of the workshops, the slides will be posted on the NLA PLTS website: http://www.nebraskalibraries.org/group/PLTS .

As PLTS Vice-Chair Francine Canfield pointed out, census data is very useful for public libraries as they facilitate their community planning process—fulfilling the requirements for Public Library Accreditation and ensuring that the library continues to build collections and offer programs that respond to the changing needs of communities. For example with five times the level of growth in seniors expected in the next ten years, we can think about working with senior citizens in our communities to plan programs that appeal to them and meet their needs. With demographic trends showing that although Nebraska communities used to see lots more older women than older men, men are now catching up and we can expect to see eight older men for every ten older women in the near future.

Census data can also be very powerful in communicating with decision makers, community residents, and the media, etc. (See http://nlc.nebraska.gov/stats/2018AdvocacyFlyer.pdf for an example of a recent flyer staff at the Nebraska Library Commission developed using data from the public library survey and the census.) One workshop participant pointed out how useful this demographic information is for grant writing. Since library staff are often asked to help library customers access demographic data, the information in this workshop is presented in a modified Train the Trainer format to help library staff feel more comfortable pointing customers to helpful resources.

In addition to the census information that can be accessed from American Fact Finder (a series of filters that allows us to drill down to specific data sets by community), the UNO Center for Public Affairs Research has developed Nebraska Quick Facts on the UNO website (https://www.unomaha.edu/college-of-public-affairs-and-community-service/center-for-public-affairs-research/programs/nebraska-quick-facts.php ) with quick reference tables showing population loss/gain between 2000 and 2010—some of these tables go back to 1880 for certain communities—and other quick facts including population estimates.

Looking at the wealth of information we can access from census data has left me looking forward to 2020 and hoping Nebraska librarians will encourage our community residents to participate in the census: Take 10 minutes for 10 questions every 10 years.

Thanks for sharing all this great information, Mary Jo Ryan

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NCompass Live: Reaching Out Through Your Collection

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘Reaching Out Through Your Collection’, on Wednesday, April 18, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

Unusual or unexpected collections are becoming more common in the library, from musical instruments and puppets to Makerspace kits libraries have them all but how can we leverage them to reach out to your community? Find out what we and libraries around the nation are doing to use their collections to expand their outreach and impact in their community.

Presenter: Natalie Bazan, Director, North Riverside Public Library District, North Riverside, IL.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • April 25 – Introducing the Nebraska Authors Database!
  • May 2 – Your Partners in Service: Accessing UNL Libraries Resources
  • May 9 – Computers in Libraries 2018
  • May 16 – 2018 One Book One Nebraska: Nebraska Presence: An Anthology of Poetry
  • May 23 – Big-Time Library Support in Small Towns
  • June 20 – Rising to the Challenge: Using the Aspen Institute Report and Action Guide for Strategic Planning

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: Tana French

Reading a Tana French novel is like taking a trip to Dublin, Ireland. Like Maeve Binchy, French manages to capture not only the spirit of this city, but its people as well. While French’s novels focus on detectives from Dublin’s murder squad, these are not your classic police procedural mysteries.  Rather, they focus on an ever-changing group of wonderfully complicated characters, full of contradictions, whose personal lives are delightfully messy. The victims, themselves, are equally interesting as well. Like the detectives who investigate their murders, their lives are complex and marked with many question marks. Rarely does the story travel in a straight line, but rather zigs and zags until the final page.

Currently, there are six novels in French’s Dublin Murder Squad series: In the Woods (2007), The Likeness (2008), Faithful Place (2010), Broken Harbor (2012), The Secret Place (2014) and The Trespasser (2016). All take place in Dublin, or the surrounding area. All take place within a short period, usually no more than over the course of a few weeks.

Unlike other series, such as the Kay Scarpetta books by Patricia Cornwell or Elizabeth George’s Inspector Lynley novels, French focuses each book on a different character. Some characters, such as Frank Mackey and Mick “Scorcher” Kennedy appear in several books. Others, like Rob Ryan from In the Woods, vanish as soon as their story concludes. That said, each title can be read in no particular order without feeling as though you’ve missed something along the way.

Ultimately, French spins terrific tales of suspense and intrigue. Her stories are not always pretty. Often, in their rush to solve a murder, French’s characters reveal their deepest and darkest secrets. Instead of making them unlikeable, it makes them relatable. After all, we all have our secrets.

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#BookFaceFriday “The Outside Boy”

Look Ma, Spring!… just kidding, this is Nebraska. Happy #BookFaceFriday.

BookFace "The Outside Boy"

As we all dream of green grass, buds on trees and temperatures above 50 degrees, hopefully this lush green #BookFace can tide us over for a bit longer. This week’s photo was a family affair, just like the book “The Outside Boy” by Jeanine Cummins (Berkley, 2010). Following a young boy’s adventures as his Pavee gypsy family moves around Ireland. We watch as he struggles with adolescence, family secrets, and the seclusion of his family’s migratory lifestyle. This novel is a part of our NLC Book Club Kit collection, and can be reserved for your book club to read today!

“Set in Ireland in 1959, Cummins’ first novel (she’s also the author of the memoir A Rip in Heaven, 2004) is a deeply moving and elegiac look at a vanishing culture. Told in Christy’s vernacular but often poetic first-person voice, The Outside Boy is gorgeously written and an implicit celebration of Irish storytelling.” —Michael Cart

Love this #BookFace & reading? We suggest checking out all the titles available for book clubs at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/ref/bookclub. Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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NCompass Live: Teen Services Without Teen Spaces: Innovative Programming

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘Teen Services Without Teen Spaces: Innovative Programming’, on Wednesday, April 11, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

Learn how the Marion Public Library, with no dedicated programming space, cultivated an after school crowd through revised scheduling, drop-in programs, and new community connections.

Presenters: Madeline Jarvis, Adult and Information Services Coordinator; Rachel Pollari, Library Assistant – Teen Services; and Shanel Slater, Library Specialist – Teen Services; Marion (IA) Public Library.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • April 18 – Reaching Out Through Your Collection
  • April 25 – Introducing the Nebraska Authors Database!
  • May 2 – Your Partners in Service: Accessing UNL Libraries Resources
  • May 16 – 2018 One Book One Nebraska: Nebraska Presence: An Anthology of Poetry
  • May 23 – Big-Time Library Support in Small Towns

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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#BookFaceFriday “Okay for Now” & “Maniac Magee”

I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream in this week’s #BookFaceFriday.

BookFace image April 6, 2018 "Okay for Now" and "Maniac Magee"

Hold onto your cone, we’ve got a two-scoop #BookFace for you this week! A few of the staff over in the Talking Book & Braille department were kind enough to help us out with this week’s Book Face (they were generously compensated with ice cream). We’re excited to highlight two great YA books in our book club collection, “Maniac Magee” by Jerry Spinelli (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, 1999) and “Okay for Now” by Gary D. Schmidt (HMH Books for Young Readers, 2013). The Nebraska Library Commission offers book club kits to both public and school libraries.  These two titles have both been honored with award nominations. “Okay for Now” was a National Book Award Finalist and “Maniac Magee” is a Newbery Medal winner! Get these young adult novels reserved for your book club to read today!

“Okay for Now” by Gary D. Schmidt 
“Reproductions of Audubon plates introduce each chapter in this stealthily powerful, unexpectedly affirming story of discovering and rescuing one’s best self, despite family pressure to do otherwise.”—Booklist, starred review

“Maniac Magee” by Jerry Spinelli
“A Newbery Medal winning modern classic about a racially divided small town and a boy who runs.” —Amazon

This week’s #BookFace models are Gabe Kramer, TBBS Audio Production Studio Manager; and Jerry Hall, TBBS volunteer! A special thanks to TBBS Director, Scott Scholz, for lending a hand.

Love this #BookFace & reading? We suggest checking out all the titles available for book clubs at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/ref/bookclub. Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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Friday Reads: The Line Becomes A River: Dispatches from the Border, By Francisco Cantu

Francisco Cantu brings a unique perspective to his debut book, The Line Becomes A River, a nuanced exploration of the United States-Mexican border. In addition to being a third-generation Mexican-American who grew up near the border, Cantu studied international relations and border policy at American University, in Washington, D.C. After graduating with honors, he served in the United States Border Patrol from 2008 to 2012, working in Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. More recently, in 2016, he earned an MFA in Nonfiction from the University of Arizona.

Given Cantu’s background and experience, he could have taken this book in many different directions; the route he chose, however, is that of a deeply personal memoir, described by reviewers as “heartfelt,” “lyrical,” “intimate,” “brutal,” and “heartbreaking.” It unfolds in three unnamed parts. Part one opens with Cantu attending training at the Border Patrol Academy, and it follows him during his initial field placements. While it includes numerous accounts of Cantu’s experiences with border crossers and fellow agents, part one is notably framed by two conversations with his mother, which establish the moral conflict at the heart of the entire narrative.

The first conversation occurs when Cantu is still in training at the academy. During her Christmas visit, Cantu’s mother struggles to understand why he wants to join the Border Patrol, which she refers to as “a paramilitary police force.” He responds: “I’m tired of studying, I’m tired of reading about the border in books. I want to be on the ground, out in the field . . . I don’t see any better way to truly understand the place.” His mother is clearly not convinced and is obviously worried about more than just his physical safety: “There are ways to learn these things that don’t put you at risk, she said, ways that let you help people instead of pitting you against them.”

The second conversation occurs at the end of part one, during a subsequent Christmas visit. When his mother asks if he likes the work and is learning what he wanted, he’s not up to having the conversation he knows she’s trying to initiate. And when she brings up “how a person can become lost in a job, how the soul can buckle when placed within a structure,” he cuts her off: “I was too exhausted to consider my passion or sense of purpose, too afraid to tell my mother about the dreams of dead bodies and crumbling teeth, . . . about my hands shaking at the wheel.”

By part two, Cantu has been promoted to doing intelligence work, first in Tucson, then in El Paso. Though he continues to recount his own experiences, his narrative increasingly focuses on the systemic violence haunting both sides of the border: the beheadings, massacres, and mass graves tied to drug cartels; and the kidnapping and ransoming of desperate border crossers by organized smuggling gangs capitalizing on stricter border enforcement. His teeth are a mess from constant grinding and his nightmares persist.

The narrative’s emotional climax occurs during part three. By this time, Cantu has quit the Border Patrol and returned to school, leaving his most intense stress behind. But completely outrunning the emotional trauma of border enforcement proves impossible. This time it affects Cantu personally, when agents detain his undocumented friend, Jose, who is trying to reenter the United States after visiting his dying mother in Mexico. Suddenly, Cantu is experiencing border enforcement from the perspective of the detainee, and the detainee’s family and friends. He does what he can to help Jose navigate the immigration and court systems, but current policies offer little recourse and his friend is deported.

In the third and final Christmas conversation with his mother, Cantu shares the pain, hurt, and conflict he feels over Jose’s situation: “I don’t know what to do, I confessed. I feel pain, I feel hurt, but it isn’t mine. . . . It’s like I never quit . . . It’s like I’m still a part of this thing that crushes.” His mother responds: “You can’t exist within a system for [four years] without being implicated, without absorbing its poison. . . So what will you do? All you can do is try to find a place to hold it, a way to not lose some purpose for it all.”

One gets the feeling this memoir—dedicated in part “to all those who risk their souls to traverse or patrol an unnatural divide”—may be one manifestation of Cantu’s effort to follow his mother’s advice.

Cantu, Francisco. The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border. New York: Riverhead, 2018.

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What’s Up Doc? New State Agency Publications at the Nebraska Library Commission

New state agency publications have been received at the Nebraska Library Commission for February 2018.  Included are Annual Reports from a variety of Nebraska state agencies. Also included are reports from the Nebraska Department of Correctional Services, the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, various committee reports to the Nebraska Legislature, and new books from the University of Nebraska Press, to name a few.

All items, except the books from the University of Nebraska Press, are available for immediate viewing and printing by clicking on the highlighted link above, or directly in the .pdf below.

The Nebraska Legislature created the Nebraska Publications Clearinghouse in 1972, a service of the Nebraska Library Commission. Its purpose is to collect, preserve, and provide access to all public information published by Nebraska state agencies.  By law (State Statutes 51-411 to 51-413) all Nebraska state agencies are required to submit their published documents to the Clearinghouse.  For more information, visit the Nebraska Publications Clearinghouse page, contact Mary Sauers, Government Information Services Librarian, or contact Bonnie Henzel, State Documents Staff Assistant.

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Free Webinar Series: The Social Library

Social Library is a regular WebJunction series featuring some of the amazing work from the libraries that we follow on Facebook. It’s a great virtual tour of how libraries are using social media to connect with their communities, promote services and programs, and engage with their patrons and fans. If you’d like to see your library featured in the Social Library series, please let WebJunction know via social@webjunction.org, or find them on Facebook.

Here are the most recent entries in the Social Library series:

Social Library, Volume 104

 News / Last Modified:20 March 2018

The latest edition of our Social Library highlights innovative ways libraries are using Facebook to connect with communities. One library is circulating fishing poles and another created a video to show that yes, people still use libraries. One libra…

Social Library, Volume 103

 News / Last Modified:20 March 2018

This edition of our Social Library series presents fresh ideas from libraries truly responding to community needs. From language classes in Cree to a lactation station for mothers, and from services for local veterans to a community discussion on new…

Social Library, Volume 102

 News / Last Modified:06 March 2018

In this next edition of the Social Library, we’re showcasing a comic con focused on diversity, patron-designed library cards, libraries as creative economic development hubs, coffee-incentivized reading, and new services for health, literacy and pare…

Social Library, Volume 95

 News / Last Modified:22 February 2018

In this edition of our Social Library series we’re highlighting a pumpkin decorating contest (no carving allowed!), a library ambassador’s take on the new Austin Public Library, a makeup workshop, a 150 celebration, and a microcollege in the Brooklyn…

Social Library, Black History Month Edition

 News / Last Modified:20 February 2018

We continue the Social Library series with this special Black History Month edition, highlighting examples of ways your library can use social media to connect your community to books, programs, videos, oral histories and other resources during the m…

Social Library, Volume 100

 News / Last Modified:06 February 2018

We began our Social Library series nearly three years ago, and we’re pleased to be publishing our 100th edition today! We’ve featured 424 different libraries, representing over 60 states and countries. We have collected each of the editions into a sp…

Social Library, Volume 99

 News / Last Modified:23 January 2018

In this, the first 2018 edition of our Social Library series, we’re highlighting a fresh set of stellar examples of libraries leveraging Facebook in innovative ways. From a fun movie tie-in contest to a reading challenge, and from staff favorites to …

Social Library, Volume 98

 News / Last Modified:04 January 2018

This fresh edition of our Social Library series is guaranteed to bring a few surprises! These libraries are adding everything from lucha libre to the DMV to their offerings, and one is presenting a unique opportunity for patrons to “read away&qu…

Social Library, Volume 90

 News / Last Modified:21 December 2017

We continue our Social Library series with this latest edition featuring dogs and dinosaurs, a mobile kitchen, and some of the innovative ways libraries are using Facebook features. Thank you to all these libraries for their great work and if you’d l…

Social Library, Volume 97

 News / Last Modified:19 December 2017

This week’s edition of our Social Library series highlights posts from five libraries we follow on Facebook, with everything from tech tips to fundraising. There’s really no limit to what you can bring to social media to engage with your community. W…

Reprinted from WebJunction Crossroads : The Newsletter for Library Learning, April 4th, 2018
Posted in Education & Training, General, Information Resources, Library Management, Programming, Technology, Uncategorized, What's Up Doc / Govdocs | Leave a comment

Young Nebraskans Win Writing Competition

 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
April 2, 2018

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Mary Jo Ryan
402-471-3434
800-307-2665

Young Nebraskans Win Writing Competition

Do young people still write letters? They do if they want to tell an author about how books can make a difference in a young person’s life. Young Nebraska writers who wrote winning letters in the Letters About Literature competition received award certificates from Gov. Pete Ricketts on at a proclamation-signing ceremony celebrating National Library Week, April 8-14, 2018. Letters About Literature is a national reading and writing promotion program. Nearly 50,000 adolescent and young readers nationwide, in grades four through twelve, participated in this year’s Letters About Literature program—hundreds of them from Nebraska. The competition encourages young people to read, be inspired, and write back to the author (living or dead) who had an impact on their lives.

This annual contest is sponsored nationally by the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress, with funding from Dollar General Literacy Foundation. The Center for the Book was established in 1977 as a public-private partnership to use the resources of the Library of Congress to stimulate public interest in books and reading. The Nebraska competition is coordinated and sponsored by the Nebraska Center for the Book, Nebraska Library Commission, Houchen Bindery Ltd., Humanities Nebraska, and Chapters Bookstore in Seward.

Young Nebraska writers to be honored are:

Winners
Avery Yosten, Norfolk, for a letter to Rob Buyea
Caleb Hans, Omaha, for a letter to Trenton Lee Stewart
Harper Leigh Wells, Axtell, for a letter to Harper Lee

Alternate Winners
Ryan Ostrander, Lincoln, for a letter to Katherine Applegate
Conleigh Hemmer, Lincoln, for a letter to Herman Melville
Daniel Con, Lexington, for a letter to Suzanne Collins

The students wrote personal letters to authors explaining how his or her work changed their view of themselves or the world. They selected authors from any genre, fiction or nonfiction, contemporary or classic. Winners were chosen from three competition levels: upper elementary, middle, and secondary school.

The Nebraska winners are honored at a luncheon and receive cash prizes and gift certificates. Their winning letters are placed in the Jane Pope Geske Heritage Room of Nebraska Authors at Bennett Martin Public Library in Lincoln. They will advance to the national competition, with a chance to win a trip to Washington, D.C. for themselves and their parents. For more information about the competition see http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/programs/LAL.html.

The Nebraska Center for the Book is housed at the Nebraska Library Commission and brings together the state’s readers, writers, booksellers, librarians, publishers, printers, educators, and scholars to build the community of the book, supporting programs to celebrate and stimulate public interest in books, reading, and the written word. The Nebraska Center for the Book is supported by the Nebraska Library Commission. As the state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services, bringing together people and information.

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.

 

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NCompass Live: Building a Future: The Big Move

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘Building a Future: The Big Move’, on Wednesday, April 4, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

The Timbrook Library, the busiest branch in the Campbell County Public Library System, located in Central Virginia, spent decades waiting for new construction. They operated out of a bookmobile (which eventually broke down and went up on blocks), a room in a school, and a storefront for many years before moving into a standalone building with amenities such as meetings spaces, tutor rooms, and a lunch room. The move was not without its own challenges. As we celebrate our second anniversary in the building, we’ll discuss the bumps and bruises (physical and on some egos) which occurred during the month-long move, how we handled this massive change, and how our team came through stronger than ever.

Presenter: Dana Bomba, Public Services Librarian, Campbell County Public Library, Lynchburg, VA.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • April 11 – Teen Services Without Teen Spaces: Innovative Programming
  • April 18 – Reaching Out Through Your Collection
  • April 25 – Introducing the Nebraska Authors Database!
  • May 2 – Your Partners in Service: Accessing UNL Libraries Resources
  • May 16 – 2018 One Book One Nebraska: Nebraska Presence: An Anthology of Poetry

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

Posted in Education & Training, Library Management | Leave a comment

#BookFaceFriday “Back When We Were Grownups”

We’re loving this #BookFaceFriday‘s 1960 vibe. It’s so very Betty Draper, if you know, Betty Draper read…

"Back When We Were Grownups" BookFace

We’re also loving the idea of reading books about women, written by women as we celebrate Women’s History Month. “Once upon a time, there was a woman who discovered she had turned into the wrong person ” that’s the opening line of this week’s #BookFaceFriday. “Back When We Were Grownups” by Anne Tyler (Alfred A. Knopf, 2001) is a familial drama, set in Baltimore, where main character Rebecca Davitch looks back over her life and questions her choices. This novel is a part of our NLC Book Club Kit collection, and can be reserved for your book club to read today!

“Her characters endear themselves to the reader with their candor and their wit and their simple decency. . . . The charm of an Anne Tyler novel lies in the clarity of her prose and the wisdom of her observations.”
                                               –The Washington Post Book World.

Love this #BookFace & reading? We suggest checking out all the titles available for book clubs at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/ref/bookclub. Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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Friday Reads: The Woman in the Window by A. J. Finn

A. J. Finn’s The Woman in the Window is a whodunit thriller with lots of surprises and unexpected outcomes. The book has been likened to Paula Hawkins’ The Girl on the Train and Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl and with elements of a Hitchcock movie.

Anna Fox, a psychologist in her late 30s, is the protagonist. Anna lives alone in an upscale Manhattan home. A young carpenter is a tenant who occupies the basement. The reader soon learns that Anna is agoraphobic and has not left her home during the past year. While living alone she has frequent phone conversations with her husband and 8-year-old daughter who are supposedly living elsewhere. Much of Anna’s time is spent watching black and white movie classics. Home bound, Anna observes her neighborhood and neighbors from her living room window. It is there that she witnesses, from a distance, a violent act in a home occupied by a family new to the neighborhood.

Anna’s fear of leaving her home, her aloneness and depression contribute to excessive drinking with wine as her favored drink. Her drinking, mixed with prescription drugs, compromises her credibility when she reports the incident to the police. Is she delusional? The conflict grows from there among Anna, the new and troubled neighbors, the police, and even her tenant. And there is Anna’s past – how did she become agoraphobic? What’s the story behind the absence of her husband and daughter?

The Woman in the Window is A. J. Finn’s first novel and a best seller from the get go. Though, not surprising because Finn (a pseudonym) is Dan Mallory, an experienced executive mystery fiction editor for William Morrow, the books publisher.

Finn, A J. The Woman in the Window. HarperCollins, 2018. Print.

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Grants Awarded to Small-Town Public Libraries

Six Nebraska public libraries recently received project funding, thanks to the generosity of a lifelong educator, the late Shirley Kreutz Bennett of Lincoln. Each year, the Kreutz Bennett Donor-Advised Fund, an affiliated fund of Nebraska Community Foundation (NCF), accepts proposals for matching grants for public libraries in communities with populations under 3,000.

Following Ms. Kreutz Bennett’s wishes, a Fund Advisory Committee composed of her nieces and nephews recommends grants in three areas: planning grants leading to accreditation; enhancement grants to improve library services; and facilities grants for new construction or the renovation, restoration or rehabilitation of current libraries.

All grants require a one-to-one match in local funding and evidence that the project has broad community support. Approximately $80,000 in grant funding is available each year. Grant seekers are encouraged to review the guidelines and application procedures at NebraskaHometown.org/give/kreutz-bennett-donor-advised-fund.

“I would definitely recommend that library directors in eligible Nebraska communities take the time to apply for grants through the Kreutz Bennett Donor-Advised Fund,” said Dawnn Tucker, director of Lied Pierce Public Library. “The grant funding that we received in Pierce has made a tremendous impact on the children’s programming in our library. We were able to purchase new books, movies, crafts, games and musical instruments to add to our children’s activities. These items have added new excitement, which in turn has increased the number of children involved. We are very thankful for this grant opportunity!” For more information, contact Reggi Carlson, NCF communications specialist, 402-323-7338 or rcarlson@nebcommfound.org.

The following libraries received grants in 2018:

Dundy County Library. A grant of $12,000 will help complete renovation of a building, which will serve as a new library facility and nearly double the space of the former building.

Dvoracek Memorial Library in Wilber. This library is located on a highway where parking is not permitted. The library received a grant of $6,250 to match funds for construction of additional parking spaces close to the main entrance for increased accessibility for library patrons.

Genoa Public Library. This library applied for and received two separate grants. The first grant in the amount of $1,000 will be used to purchase materials and supplies needed to incorporate a STREAM focus (science, technology, reading, arts, math) into children’s library programs. A second grant for $5,000 will help with repairs to the library’s exterior brick mortar, and to complete additional façade renovation on the historic building that houses the library.

Howells Public Library. The entrance to this library was damaged by flooding several years ago. A grant of $6,000 will match funds to replace the front doors with automated doors, which will increase accessibility for library patrons.

Ravenna Public Library. A grant of $20,000 will help support the fundraising campaign for construction of a new library in Ravenna.

Scribner Public Library. This library is using its $1,500 grant to incorporate a makerspace in the library and provide science-based kits, mechanical sets and sewing machines for its after-school and summer programs.

The Kreutz Bennett Donor-Advised Fund has provided 45 grants to Nebraska libraries since it began annual grantmaking in 2012. Christa Porter, Nebraska Library Commission Director of Library Development, said this grant program is perfect for libraries that are not yet accredited. “Libraries can use grant funding to gather information for their Community Needs Response Plan. This might include paying for a professional to facilitate focus groups or to conduct personal interviews or surveys,” Porter said. Other possibilities for non-accredited libraries may include one-time, or first time, costs that will help libraries earn points on the Accreditation Application. For example, help with purchasing an Integrated Library System, subscribing to online library databases, joining regional or statewide consortia, and expenditures for start-up technology purchases and services.

“Gaining accreditation is critical to our libraries. It opens the door to other outside funding,” said Jeff Yost, NCF president and CEO.  “In many small towns, the library may be the only place where some people have access to the internet.  Shirley’s legacy gift shows that she had great vision and commitment to people in our small communities. We are honored to help the family of Shirley Kreutz Bennett develop a strategy to share her passion for learning,” said Yost.

Nebraska Community Foundation is a statewide organization using charitable giving to mobilize communities across the state. NCF unleashes abundant local assets, inspires charitable giving and connects ambitious people to build stronger communities and a Greater Nebraska. NCF works with volunteer leaders serving more 250 than communities by providing training, strategic development, gift planning assistance and financial management for its affiliated funds located throughout the state. In the last five years, more than 39,000 contributions have been made to NCF affiliated funds, and more than $128 million has been reinvested to benefit Nebraska communities. For more information visit NebraskaHometown.org.

 

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Are You Signed Up For the TRIAL Mailing List?

Are you signed up for the Nebraska Library Commission’s TRIAL mailing list? If so, then you know I just sent out a mailing list message with instructions on how to get free trial access to the Statista database through April 25, 2018.

If you’re not signed up for the TRIAL mailing list, then you missed this announcement, which included a database description, a link to a demo and a link to use to get into the database for free between now and April 25, 2018. The message also included information about a 10% discount off list price for new academic and K12 subscribers.

To make sure you don’t miss future trial announcements, go to the Nebraska Library Commission Mailing Lists page and subscribe today! To request a copy of the recent Statista trial announcement, contact Susan Knisely.

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Nebraska Libraries Invited to Celebrate Money Smart Week®, April 21 – 28, 2018

Libraries across the country will offer a wealth of personal finance programs during Money Smart Week® and Nebraska libraries will join them in sponsoring educational and entertaining programs. From April 21-28, 2018, more than 1,000 of our nation’s libraries will be participating in Money Smart Week®. Library events will focus on such diverse financial issues as first-time home buying, obtaining renovation loans, preparing a personal spending plan, the property tax appeal process, evaluating financial aid packages, choosing the proper Medicare plan, and the basics of wills and trusts. Libraries are also offering programs that week on options for tax-free savings and charitable tax strategies.

Please comment below about how your Nebraska library will provide programs and resources to celebrate Money Smart Week® April 21-28, 2018. Created by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago in 2002, Money Smart Week® is a public awareness campaign designed to help consumers better manage their personal finances. This is achieved through the collaboration and coordinated effort of hundreds of organizations across the country. Classes, activities, events, and programming will be offered to all demographics and income levels and will cover all facets of personal finance. Resources for local events are available at http://www.moneysmartweek.org.

For more information, see http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2018/03/libraries-offer-wealth-personal-finance-programs-during-money-smart-week.

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