Funding for Small-Town Libraries: Kreutz Bennett Donor Advised Fund Grants

The Nebraska Community Foundation has recently announced that this year’s Kreutz Bennett Donor Advised Fund Grants are now available for public libraries in communities of fewer than 3,000 residents. The three types of grants are:

  • Planning Grants (leading to public library Accreditation)
  • Enhancement Grants (for improving library services and/or programs)
  • Facilities Grants (to contribute toward new facilities, or renovation, restoration or rehabilitation of current libraries)

The process requires submitting an initial “short application” — due by October 1, 2014. This application is reviewed and used as a basis for whether or not to invite the library to send in a “long form” application which is used to determine which libraries will receive grants during this grant year.

For details on the grants, including match requirements, levels of funding available, and many more details, contact: Reggi Carlson, Nebraska Community Foundation Communications Director, (402)323-7331 or rcarlson@nebcommfund.org or go to the following link to review the guidelines and to see the application procedures including the short application:

www.nebcommfound.org/fund/kreutz-bennett

Nebraska Community Foundation is a statewide organization using charitable giving to build prosperous communities. NCF works with volunteer leaders serving more than 200 communities by providing training, strategic development, gift planning assistance and financial management for its affiliated funds located throughout the state. In the last five years more than 35,000 contributions have been made to NCF affiliated funds, and more than $122 million has been reinvested to benefit Nebraska communities. For more information visit www.NebraskaHometown.org.

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Planes, Trains, and Automobiles

memories.ne.govOne of the fun things I like to do while browsing through Nebraska Memories is to find pictures that remind me of a phrase or movie title, then add a Nebraska twist.  That led me to today’s post about Nebraska photographer John Nelson, and the movie “Planes, Trains, and Automobiles.”

John Nelson was born in Halestad, Sweden in 1864.  He came to Nebraska with his parents at the age of seventeen.  His many photographs tell the story of small town life in Nebraska during the first decades of the 20th century.  His subjects included people, towns, businesses, community activities, early airplanes, trains, and automobiles.

The picture to the left is of the photographer himself, standing in front of the rear end of his motorized portable darkroom, between 1907 and 1917.

The pictures immediately below are the first stop in the planes, trains, and automobiles tour.  They are of a biplane with its’ pilot, two Native Americans and a woman, and then a crowd of onlookers at the site of an airplane crash, respectively, about the same time period.  These are just two of several airplane photographs taken by John Nelson found in Nebraska Memories, and illustrate the variety of pictures he took.

biplane   planecrashI

 

 

 

 

 

Trains are our next stop in the planes, trains and automobiles tour.  Mr. Nelson took photographs of the trains themselves, but also took photographs of the people and places associated with the railroads.  This can be seen in the pictures below of the “219 on Wednesdays” coming into a small Nebraska town, and in the picture of a couple standing outside the Ericson, Nebraska train depot.

219Traindepot

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then last on the tour, but certainly not least, are the pictures of automobiles.  John Nelson took many pictures of cars: everything from cars in downtown Omaha to individuals in or beside their cars, and from the F.J. O’Hara Buick Dealership in Spalding, Nebraska to automobiles decorated for parades, as seen below.

buickparadecar

 

 

 

 

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed our photographic tour of John Nelson’s planes, trains, and automobiles.  Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, or contact Beth Goble, Historical Projects Librarian, or Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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NCompass Live: Resource Description and What? RDA for Non-Catalogers

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live: “Resource Description and What? RDA for Non-Catalogers”, on Wednesday, September 3, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Have you heard the catalogers in your library mumbling about RDA, FRBR, and other mysterious acronyms? Would you like to find how recent cataloging changes could affect you? Resource Description & Access (RDA) is the new cataloging code that replaced AACR2 early in 2013, and in this session, Emily Nimsakont, the NLC’s Cataloging Librarian, will provide a translation of “cataloger-ese” to explain what RDA is. She will also discuss how the new cataloging rules will affect libraries’ OPACs, non-cataloging library staff, and library patrons.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • September 10 – Teen Tech Time: Remix Fun with Mozilla Webmaker Tools!
  • September 17 – Broadband and Mobile Broadband Coverage in Nebraska
  • September 24 – Tech Talk with Michael Sauers

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: Stubby the War Dog

Stubby the War DogI have been reading books for preschool through high school ages preparing for next year’s summer reading program “Every Hero Has a Story.”  Among my favorites so far is a nonfiction title: Stubby the War Dog by Ann Bausum, written for grades 4-7.   Stubby was a stray who connected with J. Robert Conroy, an enlisted man among many who were training on Yale’s athletic grounds in 1917.  When the time came to ship out, Stubby was smuggled on board and soon was considered by all to be a part of the unit.

He brought companionship and relieved tedium, but also helped his fellow soldiers by killing rats in the trenches, warning them of imminent gas attacks, and even captured a German soldier on his own.

Period photographs of Stubby and of the countryside at that time help to bring his story to life.  And just so you know, Stubby made it back home, and so did his best buddy Conroy.

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Youth Grants for Excellence Applications due 10/1/14

The Nebraska Library Commission announces that grants are available to accredited public libraries and state-run institutional libraries for special projects in the area of children’s and young adult services. These grants are awarded to encourage innovation and expansion of public library services for youth and their parents or caregivers. Applications will be accepted for projects in listed areas of service to youth. (See the “Introduction” link below.)

The Youth Grants for Excellence require a 25% match of the amount requested (grant amount), of which at least 10% must be a cash match. The minimum amount that will be awarded per grant is now $250. The $250 minimum grant amount plus the required 25% local match ($63) combine for $313 as the lowest total project amount for a Youth Grant for Excellence.

There are two different application forms. For projects requesting $250 – $1,000 in grant funds use the abbreviated, or short form. Applications requesting more than $1,000 must use the long form. Please be sure to use the correct form for your project. Please go to the “Introduction” page for links to the forms (at the bottom of the page).

Please note:  AWE work stations, or similar stations of other companies, are allowed this year (2014) and next year (2015) and then will no longer be eligible beginning in 2016.

You may also be interested in viewing the NCompass Live session from 8/20/14:

You are welcome to call or email Sally Snyder with questions or to ask for more information.

 

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NEH Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections Grants – applications due Dec. 3, 2014

National Endowment for the Humanities Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections helps cultural institutions meet the complex challenge of preserving large and diverse holdings of humanities materials for future generations by supporting sustainable conservation measures that mitigate deterioration and prolong the useful life of collections.

Libraries, archives, museums, and historical organizations across the country face an enormous challenge: to preserve collections that facilitate research, strengthen teaching, and provide opportunities for life-long learning in the humanities. Ensuring the preservation of books and manuscripts, photographs, sound recordings and moving images, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, art, and historical objects requires institutions to implement measures that slow deterioration and prevent catastrophic loss. This work is best accomplished through preventive conservation, which encompasses managing relative humidity, temperature, light, and pollutants in collection spaces; providing protective storage enclosures and systems for collections; and safeguarding collections from theft and from natural and man-made disasters.

As museums, libraries, archives, and other collecting institutions strive to be effective stewards of humanities collections, they must find ways to implement preventive conservation measures that are sustainable. This program therefore helps cultural repositories plan and implement preservation strategies that pragmatically balance effectiveness, cost, and environmental impact. Sustainable approaches to preservation can contribute to an institution’s financial health, reduce its use of fossil fuels, and benefit its green initiatives, while ensuring that collections are well cared for and available for use in humanities programming, education, and research.

Closing date for applications: December 3, 2014

For more information, visit http://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/sustaining-cultural-heritage-collections.

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Throwback Thursday: Interior photo of Beatrice Public Library, circa1939

Interior photo of the Beatrice Carnegie Public Library, circa 1939.

SB 9015

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Free Resources to Help Nebraska Libraries Engage Community

LTC2_0The American Library Association (ALA) is offering free materials to help libraries improve their community engagement and facilitation techniques. The materials — conversation guides, questionnaires, worksheets and webinars — are designed to help libraries strengthen their roles as core community leaders and work with residents to bring positive change to their communities.

The resources were developed by The Harwood Institute for Public Innovation, whose “turning outward” approach emphasizes changing the orientation of institutions and individuals from internal (organization-facing) to external (community-facing). This process entails taking steps to better understand communities; changing processes and thinking to make conversations more community-focused; being proactive about community issues; and developing shared aspirations.

Libraries are encouraged to download, copy and share the materials, free of charge, at ala.org/LTC. The resources are offered as part of ALA’s Libraries Transforming Communities initiative.

Available materials include tools such as:

  • Aspirations/Aspirations Facilitator’s Guide (PDF) help libraries focus on their community’s aspirations, identify next steps for creating change, and create an aspirations-based narrative for their community as a starting point for library action.
  • Turn Outward (PDF) helps libraries assess the focus of their efforts in the community as they shift their orientation from internal to external.
  • Sustaining Yourself (PDF) helps library professionals map the components that fuel their motivation and commitment for community work.

For a full list of resources, as well as a 90-day guide for getting started with the “turning outward” approach, visit ala.org/LTC.

About Libraries Transforming Communities

Libraries Transforming Communities (LTC) is an ALA initiative that seeks to strengthen libraries’ roles as core community leaders and change-agents. LTC addresses a critical need within the library field by developing and distributing new tools, resources and support for libraries to engage with their communities in new ways. As a result, ALA believes libraries will become more reflective of and connected to their communities and build stronger partnerships with local civic agencies, nonprofits, funders and corporations. The initiative is made possible through a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

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Authority Control class offered online in October

Libraries use authority control to manage the names, uniform titles, series, and subject headings in their catalogs. Participants in this class will learn what authority control is and why it is needed, how to read a MARC authority record, and how to use the Library of Congress authority file. The class will also include discussion of how to keep headings in your local systems up-to-date, and the relevance of authority control in “Next Generation” catalogs and discovery layers.

Audience: Library staff with some knowledge of AACR2/RDA, MARC records, and cataloging.

This workshop is approved for the NLC Cataloging Certificate Program.

CE Hours: 5

This class will be held online from October 27 to December 5. Class participants will access the course web site in order to read materials and complete projects and assignments. The class is held asynchronously, which means that participants are not required to be online at any particular time during the five weeks; however, there is a class schedule with due dates that participants are expected to meet. The instructor will interact with the participants during the course to offer feedback and provide explanations of material.

To register, go to the NLC Training and Events Calendar.

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Team to lead NEH-funded project to digitize Cather letters

“Willa Cather ca. 1912 wearing necklace from Sarah Orne Jewett” by Photographer: Aime Dupont Studio, New York – Willa Cather Pioneer Memorial and Educational Foundation. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Last year, the private musings of Willa Cather were made available to the masses for the first time in a book co-edited by UNL’s Andrew Jewell.

About 550 of the famous author’s letters were published in “The Selected Letters of Willa Cather.” Scholars and fans greeted the book with excitement, but the volume contained only a fraction of the more than 3,000 pieces of correspondence that Jewell and co-editor Janis Stout had uncovered from various archives and collections around the world.

Thanks to a three-year, $271,980 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, many more will be digitized and put online by the end of the decade.

A new digital scholarly edition titled “The Complete Letters of Willa Cather” will be published online as part of the Willa Cather Archive, a venture of UNL’s Center for Digital Research in the Humanities. The digital edition of Cather letters is expected to launch in January 2018, when the letters are scheduled to enter the public domain.

Read the full article @ UNL Today.

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Friday Reads: Johnny Got His Gun, by Dalton Trumbo

johhnygothisgunAt the risk of appearing like military-themed books are the only books that Nebraska Library Commission staff read during the summer, I’ve chosen a book that epitomizes this 100th anniversary of the start of World War I—for me. We always talk about books that change our lives and we know that different books can have a huge impact on our lives, sometimes depending on our life-stage and the environment. This is a book that stopped me in my tracks, and continues to this day to influence my ethical perspective and world view.

Written in 1938 by Dalton Trumbo, I came across Johnny Got His Gun as a student in a UNL English Literature class in the winter of 1970. It was among dozens of books we were assigned to read, but it is the only one I remember. This book sparked some of the liveliest discussions of my educational career, outside of discussing our original poetry in Ted Kooser’s Poetry Writing class—nothing gets the conversation heated up more than criticizing a classmate’s heartfelt, original works of poetry.

The book begins as a stream-of-consciousness, first-person narration by a severely wounded American soldier, Joe Bonham. Joe slowly comes to realize the extent of his injuries, as the reader gets to know Joe through his richly detailed memories of life before and during the war. The reader shares Joe’s growing horror as he begins to comprehend the loss of his senses one-by-one, interspersed with memories of how those senses gave him a rich full life and made him the man he was: touching, hearing, tasting, seeing, smelling (“There was a smell about the fair grounds you never forgot. A smell you never ceased dreaming of. He would always smell it somewhere back in his mind as long as he lived.”). Joe’s mind is still sharp as he struggles with existential issues: Is he awake or asleep? Is he dreaming or day-dreaming? Can he think his way out of this mess his life has become? What is the “future” for him?

The reader comes to realize the brutal horrors of war as they impact a very real person. Besides being a skillfully crafted story, the characters are so engaging and the depiction of time and place so perfect that reading this book really is like watching a movie. And no matter how badly I wanted to turn my eyes away, it was impossible to stop reading because Joe’s personality and predicament just got under my skin.

“And we won’t be back ‘till it’s over, over there,” went the words to a popular song used to recruit so many young people. But the reality is—it’s never over, over there—or over here. If the past one hundred years haven’t proved that, I don’t know what will. This war was romanticized beyond belief. The propaganda posters that drew so many to their death illustrate that target marketing was used to convince young people that their way of life depended on their participation in this “war to end all wars.” It’s a real education to take a look at examples of WW I posters at www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/wwipos/ and then contrast them to those of the Vietnam War era at http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2011/08/protest-posters-from-the-vietnam-era/243029/#slide2. wwIposter

For many of us in that English class in 1970, the comparison of the Vietnam War to WWI seemed inevitable. As we discussed this book we railed against the war that was killing our friends and former classmates—sitting in our comfortable seats in Andrews Hall, smoking cigarettes, and arguing about making the world safe for democracy. Even though the reality is that these two wars were very different—WWI was the war that introduced us to modern, efficient killing machines and chemicals—there were enough similarities to feed the dissidence that was already growing. Even the author Dalton Trumbo agrees that not all wars should be lumped together when he says, “World War II was not a romantic war… Johnny was exactly the sort of book that shouldn’t be reprinted until the war (WW II) was at an end…Johnny held a different meaning for three different wars. Its present meaning is what each reader conceives it to be, and each reader is gloriously different from every other reader, and each is also changing.”

In May 1970, the semester ended prematurely for many of us that took part in the nationwide student strike. We left the classrooms for informal seminars and teach-ins on the floor in the student union. My grade for that English class was “Incomplete,” but I learned more in that class than I did in most other ones—and this book was a big part of my education.

“Woodstock,” by Joni Mitchell

… And I dreamed I saw the bombers

Riding shotgun in the sky

And they were turning into butterflies

Above our nation

 

 

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NCompass Live: Tech Talk with Michael Sauers: RFID, Checkout Kiosks, Security Gates, and … a New Way to Check Out

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live: “Tech Talk with Michael Sauers: RFID, Checkout Kiosks, Security Gates, and … a New Way to Check Out”, on Wednesday, August 27, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

In May 2014, Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library went through an RFID conversion process. In one week. While closed. But we didn’t stop there. We also installed self-check kiosks, replaced our security gates, retrofitted our automated materials handler, and gutted the circulation lobby at the same time. David explains what his library did to prepare for this, and how they pulled it off.

DDLKavid Lee King is the Digital Services Director at Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library, where he plans, implements, and experiments with emerging technology trends. He speaks internationally about emerging trends, website management, digital experience, and social media, and has been published in many library-related journals. David was named a Library Journal Mover and Shaker for 2008. His newest book is Face2Face: Using Facebook, Twitter, and Other Social Media Tools to Create Great Customer Connections. David blogs at http://www.davidleeking.com.

In this monthly feature of NCompass Live, the NLC’s Technology Innovation Librarian, Michael Sauers, will discuss the tech news of the month and share new and exciting tech for your library. There will also be plenty of time in each episode for you to ask your tech questions. So, bring your questions with you, or send them in ahead of time, and Michael will have your answers.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • September 3 – Resource Description and What? RDA for Non-Catalogers
  • September 10 – Teen Tech Time: Remix Fun with Mozilla Webmaker Tools!
  • September 17 – Broadband and Mobile Broadband Coverage in Nebraska

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Throwback Thursday: 1902 NLC Biennial Report

1902 Nebraska Library Commission Biennial Report

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RDA Revisited class offered in Bellevue and Hastings in September

RDA logoIt’s been almost a year and a half since the national libraries (and many others) implemented Resource Description and Access (RDA) as their cataloging code. Attend this class to learn about updates that have been made to RDA since implementation and discuss the realities of cataloging (both original and copy) with RDA. The workshop will include time for hands-on creation of RDA records for a variety of items, exploration of the RDA Toolkit, and discussion about where RDA fits in the future of cataloging.

Audience: Library staff with some knowledge of AACR2/RDA, MARC records, and cataloging.

Lunch is on your own.

This workshop is approved for the NLC Cataloging Certificate Program.

CE Credits: 6

 

Location: Bellevue University

Date: September 19, 2014

Time: 9AM-4PM Central Time

Cost: No Charge

Capacity: 30

To register, visit the NLC Training and Events Calendar.

 

Location: Hastings Public Library

Date: September 23, 2014

Time: 9:30AM-4:30PM Central Time

Cost: No Charge

Capacity: 20

To register, visit the NLC Training and Events Calendar.

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First Nebraska-Produced Talking Book Now Downloadable

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
August 19, 2014

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Mary Jo Ryan
402-471-3434
800-307-2665

When the Nebraska Library Commission Talking Book and Braille Service (TBBS) recorded I Am a Man: Chief Standing Bear’s Journey for Justice, it enabled Nebraskans with a print-related disability to participate in the 2012 One Book One Nebraska statewide reading program. Now Nebraska’s recording is available for direct download to any qualifying U.S. resident through the Library of Congress’ Braille and Audio Reading Download service (BARD).

Written by Nebraska author Joe Starita and narrated by Alice Timm, this book is the first Nebraska Library Commission studio production to be offered through BARD online downloading. The book chronicles what happened when Chief Standing Bear undertook a 600-mile trek to return the body of his only son to their ancestral burial ground.

In recognition of Nebraska’s efforts, Library of Congress National Library Service Director Karen Keninger offered her congratulations, “Thank you for participating in the network-produced audiobooks on BARD pilot. I am pleased to inform you that your book . . . is now available on BARD. The posting of your book to BARD marks an important milestone in our efforts to increase the quantity of materials available on BARD.”

Launched in 2009 by the Library of Congress, BARD allows qualifying U.S. residents to download encrypted files of audio books and magazines, Braille, and music instruction materials. Materials can be accessed through home computers or through a mobile app for use with an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch device. Currently 354 Nebraskans participate in BARD—9% of TBBS borrowers—many more could be eligible (see application instructions at https://nlsbard.loc.gov/NLS/ApplicationInstructions.html). For more information see https://nlsbard.loc.gov/login/NE1A or contact nlc.talkingbook@nebraska.gov, 402-471-4038, 800-742-7691.

As Nebraska’s state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services-“bringing together people and information.”

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.

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Dining Out

Did you run out and pick up lunch today? Do you plan to eat out tonight? Are you out on the road and need a place to eat?

People in front of restaurantPeople have had a variety of choices for cafes, restaurants, steak houses, etc. in Nebraska over the years. Options included formal and informal. Al fresco dining outside this restaurant was offered in the early 1900s. The photograph to the left captures a crowd at a restaurant offering an outside lunch counter option (Nebraska State Historical Society Collection). Photographer John Nelson took many pictures in the area surrounding Wheeler County where he lived.

Vineyard , Rome Hotel, Omaha, Neb.Hanson's CafeMore formal dining at about the same time was in order at the Vineyard in Omaha’s Rome Hotel at 16th and Jackson Streets, shown in the postcard far left. The wait staff there may have been as numerous as that of the Calumet Restaurant (1411-1413 Douglas Street, Omaha) shown in the postcard bottom left. Tolf Hanson, after selling the Calumet to his brother-in-law, opened Hanson’Group of waitresses, Calumet Restaurant, Omahas Cafe in 1908, a tony restaurant that didn’t quite catch on despite extensive, expensive interior renovations. The building now houses the Omaha’s oldest Chinese restaurant at 315 S. 16th Street. (Omaha Public Library Collection)

Steak houses have also been big in Nebraska for a number of years. Denver Chop House Restaurant doggieThe Denver Chop House at 1518 Dodge Street, used cutting edge advertising in 1894, to promote their 15 Cent Restaurant on the postcard at the top left (Omaha Gorat's Steak House barPublic Library Collection). Opening somewhat later, Gorat’s Steakhouse, 4917 Center Street, Omaha, was and is a popular dining establishment. Cooks in the basement kitchen of Gorat’s Steak House cut generous portions of steak in the 1949 photograph at the left. Cooks cutting up steaksWhile upstairs in the photograph to the right, patrons could enjoy a drink at the sleek bar before eating. (The Durham Museum Collection)

 

Commercial Club dining roomJenquenz Sanitary Lunch CarIn Lincoln, businessmen could eat formally in the Commercial Club dining room on an upper floor of 1110 P Street as they do in the photograph to the left. Or someone in a hurry could grab a bite at the Jenquenz Sanitary Lunch Car a few blocks away at 222 S. 11th Street shown in the photograph to the right. (Townsend Studio Collection)

 

Mrs Tony's CafeMarchio's Italian CafeLocals and teenagers had their own favorite hangouts. Mrs. Tony’s Cafe in Fairmont with its pinball machine was popular with young people in town shown at left. (Fairmont Public Library Collection) Marchio’s Italian Cafe was part of the neighborhood at 13th and J Streets in Omaha, photograph to the right. (The Durham Museum Collection) Joe Gatto Store, view 3And anyone wanting something from the soda fountain had many choices in Lincoln, including Joe Gatto’s Store, to the left. (Townsend Studio Collection)

So, where are we going and what’s for dinner?

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, or contact Beth Goble, Historical Projects Librarian, or Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

Posted in General, Information Resources, Nebraska Memories | Leave a comment

2014 Hugo Award Winners Announced

EquoidAncillary JusticeBest Novel
Ancillary Justice, by Ann Leckie (Orbit US / Orbit UK)

Best Novella
“Equoid” by Charles Stross (Tor.com, 09-2013)

Best Novelette
“The Lady Astronaut of Mars” by Mary Robinette Kowal (maryrobinettekowal.com/Tor.com, 09-2013)

The Water That Falls on You from NowhereThe Lady Astronaut of MarsBest Short Story
“The Water That Falls on You from Nowhere” by John Chu (Tor.com, 02-2013)

Best Related Work
“We Have Always Fought: Challenging the Women, Cattle and Slaves Narrative” by Kameron Hurley (A Dribble of Ink)

Best Graphic Story
“Time” by Randall Munroe (xkcd)

lightspeed_49_june_2014 We Have Always Fought Challenging the Women, Cattle and Slaves NarrativeBest Dramatic Presentation, Long Form
Gravity written by Alfonso Cuarón & Jonás Cuarón, directed by Alfonso Cuarón (Esperanto Filmoj; Heyday Films;Warner Bros.)

Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form
Game of Thrones “The Rains of Castamere” written by David Benioff & D.B. Weiss, directed by David Nutter (HBO Entertainment in association with Bighead, Littlehead; Television 360; Startling Television and Generator Productions)

Game of ThronesGravityBest Editor, Short Form
Ellen Datlow

Best Editor, Long Form
Ginjer Buchanan

Best Professional Artist
Julie Dillon

Best Semiprozine
Lightspeed Magazine edited by John Joseph Adams, Rich Horton,
and Stefan Rudnicki

Best Fanzine
A Dribble of Ink edited by Aidan Moher

Best Fancast
SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester

Best Fan Writer
Kameron Hurley

Best Fan Artist
Sarah Webb

Full details including nominees and vote totals can be found on the Hugo Awards site.

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NCompass Live: What You Need to Know to Apply for a Youth Grant

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live: “What You Need to Know to Apply for a Youth Grant”, on Wednesday, August 20, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Are you planning to apply for the Youth Excellence Grant this year? Attend this webinar to make sure your application rises to the top! Sally Snyder and Devra Dragos, from the Nebraska Library Commission, will talk about how to answer the application questions to best present your youth project. Many of the items they will talk about will also be useful when applying for other grants as well.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • August 27 – Tech Talk with Michael Sauers: RFID, Checkout Kiosks, Security Gates, and … a New Way to Check Out
  • September 3 – Resource Description and What? RDA for Non-Catalogers
  • September 17 – Broadband and Mobile Broadband Coverage in Nebraska

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: Bomb: The Race to Build–and Steal–the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon, by Steve Sheinkin

book cover imageAt the end of summer, my 12-year-old son and I road tripped to South Texas to visit friends. This involved a two-day drive down and a two-day drive back. To me, road trips mean audiobooks. Although my son is the stereotypical boy who doesn’t read, he has enjoyed audiobooks in the past; therefore I came prepared with three young adult possibilities, checked out from OverDrive and downloaded to my Kindle Fire: a dystopian thriller, a baseball mystery, and a nonfiction history book.

Listening to an audiobook held no appeal for him on the way down to Texas, but on the way back, the novelty of road tripping having completely worn off, he gave in to my suggestion that he select a title for us to listen to. Scanning the three I’d downloaded, it was really no contest: he immediately picked the nonfiction history book, Bomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon, by Steve Sheinkin.

This is a great example of a nonfiction title that reads like fiction, and my son was rapt throughout the seven hour narration. The story jumps back and forth between Soviet agents recruiting young, initially unemployed U.S. chemist Harry Gold as a spy, Robert Oppenheimer’s efforts to assemble a team of scientists to build an atomic bomb at Los Alamos, and Norwegian resistance fighters’ intricate and ultimately successful plan to sabotage a heavy water plant in Norway in order to disrupt Nazi development of nuclear weapons.

The plot involving the Norwegian commandos was like something out of a James Bond or Mission Impossible movie, and my son sat bolt upright in his seat, the Kindle held to his ear so he wouldn’t miss a word. At one point he exclaimed “I could listen to this book forever!” Talk about music to a librarian mother’s ears! And when the team succeeded in infiltrating and blowing up the plant, he reacted with a fist pump and a “Yes!”

Learning about the espionage networks at work at the time was also fascinating. One of my favorite scenes involved two spies meeting up. Their handlers had given each spy half a Jell-O box cover. At first contact each man produced his half of the Jell-O box cover; when placed next to one another they matched up perfectly, letting each spy know that the other was legitimate.

Upon returning home I looked up author Steve Sheinkin and discovered that he’s penned additional nonfiction history books for young adults. And what do you know! My son had previously read and enjoyed two of them: The Notorious Benedict Arnold: A True Story of Adventure, Heroism & Treachery and King George: What Was His Problem?: The Whole Hilarious Story of the American Revolution. Given his 100% satisfaction rating to date, Steve Sheinkin is definitely an author who’ll stay on my radar as I continue to search for the right books for my particular reluctant reader!

Sheinkin, Steve. Bomb: The Race to Build–and Steal–The World’s Most Dangerous Weapon. Listening Library, 2013. (Listen to excerpt)

 

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This day in history…

Today marks the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Panama Canal.  Below is a poster sent out by the U.S. Census Bureau to commemorate this remarkable feat of engineering.

Panama Canal

 

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