NCompass Live: Why Diverse Literature Matters for Youth Services

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘Why Diverse Literature Matters for Youth Services’, on Wednesday, February 21, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

This episode’s discussion will focus on the need for robust representation of cultures, religions, and lifestyles in our book collections. A key part of this topic includes a conversation regarding the effects of exposing young readers to diverse literature and why this is important.

Presenter: Erica Rose, Library Science Faculty, University of Nebraska – Omaha.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Feb. 28 – Eleven Ways Your Current Tutorials Are as Forgettable as Barb and What to Do About It
  • March 7 – Pioneers in Violence Prevention: Libraries & Rape Crisis Centers
  • March 14 – Tops and Flops of Library Programs
  • March 21 – Reading Diversely
  • March 28 – Providing Access to the Good Life for the Disabled

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable

Today I’m writing about a book I’m not done reading yet, because I already know I can recommend it—especially to any Nebraskan who wants to know more than they (might have?) learned in school about Malcolm X.

Manning Marable worked for years on “Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention,” and it’s a book that combines extensive research with skillful storytelling and readability. Marable died shortly before the book was published in 2011. The book went on to win the Pulitzer Prize, and gathered both wide acclaim and bitter detraction.

It was a labor of love for Manning Marable, who was Director of Columbia University’s Institute for Research in African-American Studies (IRAAS), which is responsible for the The Malcolm X Project at Columbia University. Marable takes a more academic, yet still very readable, approach to the life of Malcolm X than the book you might already be familiar with, The Autobiography of Malcolm X, which was a collaboration between X and Alex Haley. If you’re not already familiar with that book, which came out in 1965 shortly after the death of Malcolm X, we have copies in our book club kit collection here, and it’s also recommended. It made the Nebraska 150 Books list.

Marable’s detractors fault him for being perhaps too eager to present details that the autobiography may have glossed over, enhanced, or simply left out. Each book has a different goal, to be sure, and to my mind it seems that the persona that is set forth in the autobiography was one that Marable accepted, and that he knew to be secure and strong in the minds of readers—and so his unexpected explorations are really a testament to his faith in the significance and consequence of Malcolm X as an individual. When you’ve centered so much of your professional life around someone’s legacy, as Marable did, especially when that someone is as complex as Malcolm X, appreciating and acknowledging that complexity is what separates dedication from devotion, or veneration from worship.

I can understand why such honesty might not seem refreshing, however, given the context of the current struggle for racial justice, whether it’s 1965, 2011, or 2018. There are plenty of other voices who can speak to this more eloquently and appropriately than I can. (I already have A Lie of Reinvention: Correcting Manning Marable’s Malcolm X [ed. Ball and Burroughs] checked out to read next, in order to better understand these objections.)

Of particular interest to Nebraskans, Marable’s book gives more context to the Omaha life of the family of Malcolm X than Nebraskans might know, and you’ll read disturbing details of KKK activity in Lincoln and Omaha in the early 1900s. This is a part of Nebraska history you also might not have learned about in school. To put that in some context, we’re coming up on the 100-year anniversary of the Omaha race riot of 1919, where a mob of white people stormed the Douglas County Courthouse and lynched a black man, Will Brown, awaiting trial for a crime he most likely did not commit. The mob also fatally wounded the Omaha mayor, Edward Smith. For more background on the event, see this recent addition to Nebraska Memories, and also this pdf from the Nebraska State Historical Society.

Marable, Manning. Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention. New York: Viking, 2011. Print.

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#BookFaceFriday “Abraham Lincoln”

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth a new #BookFaceFriday!

"Abraham Lincoln and a Nation Worth Fighting For" BookFace Image

Wait, that’s not how that one goes… my 5th grade teacher, Mrs. Golka, would be aghast! Looks like I should be boning up on my presidential knowledge, and just in time for Presidents’ Day. A good place to start would be with James A. Rawley’s “Abraham Lincoln and a Nation Worth Fighting For” (University of Nebraska Press, 2003).  It’s described as a vividly descriptive, concise, and fresh look at Lincoln’s presidential years. As part of our permanent collection it’s available for check out to anyone. Just ask our amazing Information Services staff! This title is published by the University of Nebraska Press, which we collect from for our state document program.

“Complementing his impressive rendition of Lincoln’s bold and increasingly competent administration of the government, Rawley offers a brief background and succinct opinions on virtually every significant incident and issue in Lincoln’s public and private life. . . . Rawley has written a valuable study.”
Civil War History

James A. Rawley is Carl Adolph Happold Professor Emeritus at the University of Nebraska. He is the author of numerous books, including Turning Points of the Civil War (Nebraska 1989), The Politics of Union: Northern Politics during the Civil War (Nebraska 1974), and Secession: The Disruption of the American Republic, 1844–1861.

This week’s #BookFace model is our Planning and Data Services Coordinator, Sam Shaw!

Love this #BookFace & reading? We suggest checking out all the titles available for book clubs at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/ref/bookclub. Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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Digital Preservation Workshop to be Held in Lincoln

A half-day workshop for representatives from libraries, archives, museums, or other cultural heritage institutions will be offered on March 1, 2018, 9:00 a.m.-noon. Workshop participants will gain an understanding of the challenges of digital preservation, the ways that assessment can make those challenges more manageable, the steps in digital preservation assessment, and the tools to perform a basic peer assessment. The workshop will be held at the Nebraska History Museum (Gilmore Room), 131 Centennial Mall North, Lincoln, NE. Workshop fee: $25.

The Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC) received a National Endowment for the Humanities Preservation and Access Education and Training grant to prepare and present a collaborative Digital Preservation Assessment training program. This program approaches digital preservation assessment and training through case-study assessments, shadowing opportunities, workshops, a training institute, and a final symposium. Register for the workshop in Lincoln at https://www.nedcc.org/preservation-training/registration?p=361.

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Scores of Love

Are you still looking for a unique way to express your love to a special someone today? Can you sing, play the piano and/or play the ukulele? If you answered yes, I have a few scores for you. One of the participants in Nebraska Memories is the Polley Music Library. Included in their collection are 256 musical scores. The complete scores are available so if you have the skills you can perform one these love songs for your special someone.

  • Written by Sara S. Green and Frances M. Green of Beatrice, Nebraska.
  • First line of the chorus: “Lovin’ you, that’s all I do”

Let me sail on the ship of love
Let me sail on the ship of love

  • Written by Elsie Butz of Talmage, Nebraska.
  • Chorus:
    “Let me sail on the ship of love,
    And dream the whole time thru,
    Let me sail on the ship of love,
    ‘Way from all trouble too,
    Where there is no cloud or sorrow
    Only ones you have to borrow,
    Let me sail on the ship of love,
    With dreams of love and you.”

Love’s faithLove's faith

  • Written by Edith Louise Neumann and Carleton Everett Knox of Wymore, Neb.
  • First line: “My faith in you clear heart is fixed”

 

 

By the waters of Minnetonka: an Indian love songBy the waters of Minnetonka: an Indian love song

  • The sheet music was written by Thurlow Lieurance who was a facility member at the University School of Music, Lincoln, Nebraska.
  • This version of the song does not including lyrics.
  • You can also listen to this song being played on the piano.

 

Sweet memories of love : a beautiful songSweet memories of love : a beautiful song

  • Written by Louis Chobar while he was serving time in a Nebraska prison for a murder conviction.
  • First line: “Years slowly pass since we parted”
  • This piece includes an arrangement for the ukulele.

 

When you're really and truly in loveWhen you’re really and truly in loveWhen you're really and truly in love

  • Written by Richard Lieurance.
  • First line: “There’s a time in your life when struggle and strife seem to bed each other adieu.”
  • This piece includes an arrangement for the ukulele.

 

Two little songs

  • This score contains two songs, Cupid’s Calendar and Sweetheart.
  • Written by J. A. Parks
  • Here are the lyrics for Cupid’s Calendar:
    “When I’m with you, dearest one, the hours as minutes fly,
    And Love cheats Time so sweetly, that his calendar’s awry;
    But Cupid finds an easy way, to set the time-card true,
    For minutes drag to hours, dear heart, when I’m away from you!”
    Two little songs

 

Happy Valentine’s Day everyone!

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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Teachers and Librarians Invited to Host Letter Writing Clinics

Books make a difference in the lives of Nebraska young people. We know this because they say so in the letters they write to authors for the Letters About Literature competition. In her 2014 winning letter to Gary Soto, Sydney Kohl says, “The work inspired me to be true to myself, and also taught me the importance of each and every small perk in life. Our time on Earth is short, and might not be perfect, but as long as we take advantage of the opportunities given to us, maybe that’s okay.” *

Nebraska teachers and librarians are invited to apply for $300 grants to conduct Letters About Literature Letter Writing Clinics. Funding will be provided to introduce students to the Letters about Literature (LAL) contest and letter writing techniques, and to work with them to select books and craft letters to the authors. Grant funds can be used for items such as instructor honorariums, supplies, marketing, small participation prizes, etc. Applicants will target their efforts to specific age groups: grades 4-6, grades 7-8, or grades 9-12

For more information about the LAL Letter Writing Clinic grant (due April 15), see http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/lalwritingclinics or contact Mary Jo Ryan, Nebraska Library Commission, 402-471-4870, 800-307-2665. This grant opportunity is sponsored by the Nebraska Center for the Book and Nebraska Library Commission and supported by Humanities Nebraska. More about how the LAL national reading and writing promotion program encourages young readers in grades 4-12 to explore what books mean to them by writing a personal letter to an author is available at centerforthebook.nebraska.gov.

* Get inspired by listening to Nebraska winners Ashley Xiques and Sydney Kohl read and talk about and their winning letters to the authors that meant something to them at NET Radio’s All About Books.

NOTE: The Letters About Literature competition is made possible by a generous grant from the Dollar General Literacy Foundation, with additional support from gifts to the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress, which promotes the contest through its affiliate Centers for the Book, state libraries, and other organizations. Letters About Literature is coordinated and sponsored in Nebraska by the Nebraska Center for the Book and the Nebraska Library Commission, with support from Houchen Bindery, Ltd. and Chapters Bookstore in Seward.

 

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Youth Awards Announced at ALA Midwinter Meeting

Here is a quick look at some of the book awards announced today in Denver.  For a PDF of the complete list of winners and Honor Books click here.

John Newbery Medal goes to Hello, Universe, written by Erin Entrada Kelly. Three Honor Books were also named.

Randolph Caldecott Medal was awarded to Wolf in the Snow, illustrated and written by Matthew Cordell. Four Honor Books were named.

Coretta Scott King Author Award was given to Piecing Me Together, written by Renée Watson, and three Honor Books were named.

Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award recipient is Ekua Holmes for Out of Wonder: Poems Celebrating Poets, two Honor Books were named.

Michael L. Printz Award recipient is We Are Okay, written by Nina LaCour and four Honor Books were noted.

I hope you get a chance to read one or two award-winning titles of your choice.  It is a great day when the country’s attention is on reading and books.

 

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E-rate: Form 470 Deadline and Online Resources

Just a reminder …. Thursday, February 22 is the deadline to submit the first form in the E-rate process, Form 470, for the upcoming 2018 Funding Year.

The filing window for submitting the second form in the process, Form 471, opened on Thursday, January 11, and will close at 11:59 PM EDT on Thursday, March 22. This makes February 22 the deadline to post your Form 470 to the USAC website, meet the 28-day posting requirement for the competitive bidding process, and submit a Form 471 by the filing window closing date.

However, we do not recommend waiting until the last day to submit your Form 470! If there are any issues that day, like the E-rate servers are slowed down because it is the last day to submit, or you can’t submit the form due to reasons on your end, such as illness, weather, power outage, etc., then you would miss the deadline and lose out on E-rate altogether. So, get your E-rate process started and submit your Form 470 as soon as possible!

Do you need help completing your forms? Do you have questions about E-rate? You’re in luck!

USAC has Form 470 resources on their website:

And more recorded webinars, demos, and training materials are available on the NLC E-rate webpage.

If you have any questions or need any assistance with your E-rate forms, please contact Christa Porter, 800-307-2665, 402-471-3107.

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Friday Reads: The Great British Baking Show

If you need any sort of pure happiness today or any day, watch The Great British Baking Show. Amateur bakers compete each week in various challenges from technical skill-basked tasks to creating towering “showstopper” cakes (like a shortbread clock tower). I started watching this last year or so on PBS and got hooked. It’s funny, full of beautiful pastries, and lovely people. Netflix has a few seasons now plus Masterclass (which is the two judges teaching you how to bake amazing things from the show).

So for this Friday Reads, I thought I would round up a few of the Great British Baking Show related books that I’ve started reading or adding to my bookshelf. Easy-to-follow, step-by-step recipes with lots of pictures in the cookbooks. A Baker’s Life by Paul Hollywood is more memoir/cookbook, telling his story through nostalgic recipes. Sue Perkins narrates her memoir, Spectacles, in the audio version which I’ve heard is great. Plus a coloring book!

 

 

The Great British Bake Off Big Book of Baking – Linda Collister

 

 

 

Mary Berry’s Baking Bible: Over 250 Classic Recipes – Mary Berry

 

 

 

 

How to Bake – Paul Hollywood

 

 

 

 

 

A Baker’s Life: 100 Fantastic Recipes, from Childhood Bakes to Five-Star Excellence – Paul Hollywood

 

 

 

Spectacles – Sue Perkins

 

 

 

 

Recipe for Life – Mary Berry

 

 

 

 

The Great British Bake Off Colouring Book – Tom Hovey (who also does all the illustrations on the show)

 

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NCompass Live: More Than a Library – a Positive Change Agent

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘More Than a Library – a Positive Change Agent’, on Wednesday, February 14, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

This session will discuss the Millvale Community Library, a unique sustainable library with solar roof panels that was built from the ground up in 7 years, and now has a makerspace, is connected to a tea shop, and has 3 tenants above the library. We see it as our job to support our community economically, ecologically, and socially. The library is working day and night to make the Borough of Millvale a nicer place to live and learn.

Presenter: Susan McClellan, Executive Director, Millvale Community Library, Millvale, PA.

 

 

 

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Feb. 21 – Why Diverse Literature Matters for Youth Services
  • Feb. 28 – Eleven Ways Your Current Tutorials Are as Forgettable as Barb and What to Do About It
  • March 7 – Pioneers in Violence Prevention: Libraries & Rape Crisis Centers
  • March 14 – Tops and Flops of Library Programs
  • March 28 – Providing Access to the Good Life for the Disabled

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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#BookFaceFriday “Falling in Love with Natassia”

We’re celebrating Valentine’s Day a little early with this week’s  #BookFaceFriday!

"Falling In Love With Natassia" bookface image

We thought the cover of “Falling in Love with Natassia” by Anna Monardo (Doubleday, 2006) would be perfect for #BookFace (or I suppose it’s more like #BookLegs today).  Nevertheless, we love how this shot turned out. “Falling in Love with Natassia” is a part of our Book Club Kit collection. Put it on your list to check out today!

“A passionate novel about a dancer and her daughter as they rediscover the nature of grace—within their bodies and their souls. Anna Monardo writes beautifully and vividly about the fusion of love and sorrow, about the mystery of redemption.”

—Ursula Hegi, author of Stones from the River

Anna Monardo’s work has appeared in a variety of anthologies and journals, including Prairie Schooner, where a prize-winning excerpt of Falling in Love with Natassia was first published. After many years in New York City, she now lives in Nebraska, where she teaches in the Writer’s Workshop of the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

This week’s #BookFace model is Library Development Services Staff Assistant, Linda Babcock!

Love this #BookFace & reading? We suggest checking out all the titles available for book clubs at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/ref/bookclub. Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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Nebraska Librarians Invited to Plan a Program for One Book One Nebraska in April

National Poetry Month each April is the largest literary celebration in the world, with tens of millions of readers, students, K-12 teachers, librarians, booksellers, literary events curators, publishers, bloggers, and poets marking poetry’s important place in our culture and our lives.

While we celebrate poets and poetry year-round, the Academy of American Poets was inspired by the successful celebrations of Black History Month (February) and Women’s History Month (March), and founded National Poetry Month in April 1996 with an aim to:

  • highlight the extraordinary legacy and ongoing achievement of American poets,
  • encourage the reading of poems,
  • assist teachers in bringing poetry into their classrooms,
  • increase the attention paid to poetry by national and local media,
  • encourage increased publication and distribution of poetry books, and
  • encourage support for poets and poetry.
2018 One Book One Nebraska Poster

Download customizable posters for your 2018 One Book One Nebraska event. Available on the 2018 OBON website.

This year’s One Book One Nebraska selection offers a great opportunity for participation. The 2018 One Book One Nebraska: Nebraska Presence: An Anthology of Poetry (The Backwaters Press, 2007) edited by Greg Kosmicki and Mary K. Stillwell includes poems by more than eighty contemporary Nebraska poets, including Pulitzer Prize winner and former Poet Laureate of the United States Ted Kooser, Nebraska State Poet Twyla Hansen, former State Poet William Kloefkorn, and many others. Nebraska libraries are encouraged to organize groups to read the book in your library (book club kits available at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/ref/bookclub/index.asp or from your Regional Library System) and to plan programs to celebrate Nebraska poetry (ideas for programs at http://onebook.nebraska.gov/2018/get-involved.aspx).

The One Book One Nebraska reading program, sponsored by the Nebraska Center for the Book, Nebraska Library Commission, and Humanities Nebraska is entering its fourteenth year. It encourages Nebraskans across the state to read and discuss one book, chosen from books written by Nebraska authors or that have a Nebraska theme or setting. Libraries across Nebraska will join other literary and cultural organizations in planning book discussions, activities, and events to encourage Nebraskans to read and discuss this book. Support materials to assist with local reading/discussion activities are available at http://onebook.nebraska.gov. Updates and activity listings will be posted there and on http://www.facebook.com/onebookonenebraska.

The Nebraska Center for the Book is housed at the Nebraska Library Commission and brings together the state’s readers, writers, booksellers, librarians, publishers, printers, educators, and scholars to build the community of the book, supporting programs to celebrate and stimulate public interest in books, reading, and the written word. The Nebraska Center for the Book is supported by the Nebraska Library Commission.

 

 

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Best Small Library in America at Big Talk From Small Libraries 2018

Register today for Big Talk From Small Libraries 2018 and hear how the Boundary County Library in Bonners Ferry, ID earned the 2017 Best Small Library in America award!

Library Director Craig Anderson will be joining us to share the story of how the library and the community joined together to “Create a Culture of Opportunity!”.

Big Talk From Small Libraries 2018 will be held on Friday, February 23, 2018 via the GoToWebinar online meeting service.

This free one-day online conference is aimed at librarians from small libraries; the smaller the better! Each of our speakers is from a small library or directly works with small libraries. Everyone is welcome to register and attend, regardless of how big or small your library. But, if your library serves a few thousand people, or a few hundred, this is the day for you!

Check out the full schedule on the conference website.

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What’s Up Doc? New State Agency Publications at the Nebraska Library Commission

New state agency publications have been received at the Nebraska Library Commission for January 2018.  Included are reports from the Nebraska Accountability and Disclosure Commission, the Invest Nebraska Corporation, Nebraska’s Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education, and new books from the University of Nebraska Press, to name a few.

All items, except the books from the University of Nebraska Press, are available for immediate viewing and printing by clicking on the highlighted .pdf link above, or directly in the .pdf below.

The Nebraska Legislature created the Nebraska Publications Clearinghouse in 1972, a service of the Nebraska Library Commission. Its purpose is to collect, preserve, and provide access to all public information published by Nebraska state agencies.  By law (State Statutes 51-411 to 51-413) all Nebraska state agencies are required to submit their published documents to the Clearinghouse.  For more information, visit the Nebraska Publications Clearinghouse page, contact Mary Sauers, Government Information Services Librarian, or contact Bonnie Henzel, State Documents Staff Assistant.

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Free Webinar–Money on Our Minds: How to Help Library Patrons Make Financial Choices

You are invited to participate in a webinar to learn about the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB)’s financial education resources on Thursday, February 22, 2018 from 2:00 to 3:00pm eastern standard time. See below for details.

Many Americans are turning to a trusted source in their communities, their local public library.  The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), a federal government agency, recognizes that libraries are a powerful and trusted community resource, and has materials specifically for libraries to use to inform their patrons about financial education.  Collaborating with the CFPB makes it easy for libraries to refer your patrons to trusted sources so they can make important money decisions.

Learn more about the value provided for libraries collaborating with CFPB

You can learn more about this exciting opportunity to help empower your patrons in the financial services market through an upcoming webinar conducted by the CFPB.

Thursday, February 22, 2018

2:00-3:00 pm (Eastern Time)

Step 1:  To join the February 22nd webinar, please go to the following link at the time of the webinar:

https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=PWXW6738308&p=7758404&t=c

(Note that this webinar link will not be live until the day of the webinar).

Step 2:  Listen to the audio by dialing 888-795-5920 and entering participant passcode 77-58-404.

Step 3: If you can’t participate on the day of the webinar, it will be recorded, and available for later viewing here:  CFPB Library Training Resources

If you have any questions about this webinar-or about CFPB’s Libraries Initiative–please contact Ken McDonnell at Kenneth.mcdonnell@cfpb.gov;

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau : consumerfinance.gov 

Posted in Education & Training, General, Information Resources, Library Management, Programming, Uncategorized, What's Up Doc / Govdocs | 1 Comment

Beautiful Snow

After the recent snowstorm, I saw many beautiful pictures of the snow. The pictures were taken by both friends and strangers from across Nebraska. Some were taken to show the amount of snow received while others were taken to show nature’s beauty. As I was looking at the images in Nebraska Memories today, I noticed a number of similar images of snow taken 100+ years ago. Here are a few of my favorites.

Beautiful Snow

Beautiful Snow

Cedar River

Cedar River

The first four photos in this post were taken by John Nelson. John Nelson was born in Sweden and moved to Wheeler County Nebraska with his parents when he was a young man. Eventually he opened a photography studio in Ericson Nebraska. While we don’t know the exact dates these photos were taken, we believe they were taken sometime between 1907 and 1918.

The above stereoscopic photograph shows antique farm machinery covered in snow. On the right image, in the bottom left corner, someone wrote “The Beautiful Snow”.

The next photo shows the banks of the Cedar River covered in snow. The Cedar River is a long winding river that starts in northern Nebraska, goes by Ericson, and finally joins the Loup River west of Fullerton, NE.

Snow covered trees and field

Snow covered trees and field

Farmhouse in snow

Farmhouse in snow

The second stereoscopic photograph shows snow covered trees and field. Images like this are timeless. It’s easy to imagine someone taking a photo like this during the last snowstorm.

The fourth picture shows Nels and Bengta Nelson’s farmhouse. They were John Nelson’s parents. The snowdrifts look large and the tracks in the snow look deep.

Clarkson Hospital

Clarkson Hospital

Photos of two other buildings caught my attention. This photo of the Clarkson Hospital in Omaha from the early 1900’s shows a portion of 21st Street in Omaha. The street looks to be snow packed and a little rough. I don’t think it would be a fun street to drive down.

I was surprised when I first saw this postcard of the Nebraska State Capitol in winter. This was the first time I’d seen a postcard of the second capitol with snow on the ground.

State Capitol in winter, Lincoln, Neb.

State Capitol in winter, Lincoln, Neb.

While the capitol may look nice surrounded by snow not everyone was impressed with the building. This postcard was never mailed but someone did write a note on the back. Here are their thoughts on the building. “This is an old “ramshackle” place surrounding by a park as shown in picture.” The person’s description of the building was probably correct. Construction on this capitol was completed in 1888 however, the construction was supposed to have been poor. In 1919, the Legislatures passed a bill providing for the construction of a new capitol that still stands today.

The last three images I would like to highlight are postcards of Hanscom Park in Omaha. Hanscom Park is located about a block west of Interstate 480 and the Martha Street exit. The land for the park was donated in 1872 and was improved in 1889. The park appears to have been a popular spot or at least a popular spot to take photographs. There are 30+ images on Hanscom Park in Nebraska Memories.

Winter scene in Hamscom Park, Omaha, Nebr.

Winter scene in Hamscom Park, Omaha, Nebr.

Winter beauty, Hanscom Park, Omaha, Neb.

Winter beauty, Hanscom Park, Omaha, Neb.

Hanscom Park in winter, Omaha, Nebr.

Hanscom Park in winter, Omaha, Nebr.

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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#BookFaceFriday “Letters of Mari Sandoz”

We like to celebrate the end of the week with #BookFaceFriday!

"Letters of Mari Sandoz" Bookface

Today we also get to celebrate the beloved Nebraska author Mari Sandoz with “Letters of Mari Sandoz” edited by Helen Winter Stauffer (University of Nebraska Press, 1992). Included in the book are over nearly forty years—from 1928 to 1966—of letters. Dive in to Sandoz’s world as she documents her own experiences, struggles, and successes. As part of our permanent collection it’s available for check out to anyone. Just ask our amazing Information Services staff! This title is published by the University of Nebraska Press, which we collect from for our state document program.

From the Back Cover:
“Mari Sandoz came out of the Sandhills of Nebraska to write at least three enduring books: Old Jules, Cheyenne Autumn, and Crazy Horse, the Strange man of the Oglalas. She was a tireless researcher, a true story-teller, an artist passionately dedicated to a place little know and a people largely misunderstood.”

This week’s #BookFace model is TBBS Volunteer Services Coordinator, Annette Hall!

Love this #BookFace & reading? We suggest checking out all the titles available for book clubs at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/ref/bookclub. Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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Throwback Thursday: John Ellis Album

Happy #ThrowbackThursday from Nebraska Memories.

We’re changing it up a little this week to showcase the wide variety of documents in the Nebraska Memories archive. While photographs are visually captivating, Nebraska Memories contains so much more than just photos. Today we have just such an example with a Mr. John Ellis’s autograph album. Containing inscriptions from the 1880’s, take a little time to read through them. We’ve only included a few in this post, but another fifteen are available for your perusal on the Nebraska Memories website. Check them out, there are some really comical and interesting inscriptions!

This 5″ x 3″ autograph album has a cover with a floral design on it. The pages of the album are filled with inscriptions addressed to “John” or “Johnnie.” Some of the inscriptions have dates from years in the 1880s.

Johny Ellis 
Some write for plesure [pleasure]
Some write for fame
But I write simply to sine my name. 
Franklin. C Compton. 
Genoa. Neb. [Nebraska] Feb. [February] 24. 1888

Friend Johnnie
If in this world of grief and pain
My friend..we never meet again
Oh.. my we meet beyond the the skies
Where friendship blooms and never dies
Your well wisher
Lennie[?] Foster
Genoe [Genoa] Neb [Nebraska] Mar [March] 4th 1881

Dec. [December]  18th 1887 
Friend John 
Remember me when far far off
Where the woodchucks die
Of whooping cough.

Yours Truly
John T. Nutcher
Reed Box Butte Co. [County]
Nebr. [Nebraska]

Interested in Nebraska history? Find out more about this photo in the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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NCompass Live: The Innovation in Libraries Awesome Foundation Chapter

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘The Innovation in Libraries Awesome Foundation Chapter’, on Wednesday, January 31, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

Transformative innovation is often driven by small scale projects and experiments. The Innovation in Libraries Awesome Foundation Chapter was created to support the prototyping of library innovations that embody the principles of diversity, inclusivity, creativity, and risk-taking. Since its founding, the chapter has supported projects from around the world that reflect the potential of citizen and library driven collaborations to address community issues and innovations. This session will discuss how the chapter was formed, the projects that have been funded, and the future direction of the Innovation in Libraries Chapter.

Check out the video to learn more.

Presenters: Joshua Finnell, Associate Professor, Head of Research & Instruction, Colgate University; Bonnie Tijerina, Data & Society Fellow, founder of ER&L (Electronic Resources & Libraries); Sheila Garcia, Resident Librarian, University of Michigan.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Feb. 21 – Why Diverse Literature Matters for Youth Services
  • Feb. 28 – Eleven Ways Your Current Tutorials Are as Forgettable as Barb and What to Do About It

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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#BookFaceFriday “Feathering Custer”

Hey, book lovers! Happy #BookFaceFriday!

"Feathering Custer" BookFace"Feathering Custer" BookFace2

As we dive in to our permanent collection, which dates back to 1972, we’re bound to find some gems. One such book is “Feathering Custer” by William S. Penn (University of Nebraska Press, 2001). As part of our permanent collection it’s available for check out to anyone. Just ask our amazing Information Services staff! This title is published by the University of Nebraska Press, which we collect from for our state document program.

Feathering Custer points to the need for critical understanding of the literatures of Native America. Penn’s volume offers a challenge to all those interested in meaningful insights into these literary works to search the indigenous storytelling traditions, lives, and literatures of Native Americans.”—World Literature Today

This week’s #BookFace model is Tom Rolfes, Education I.T. Manager at the Nebraska Office of the CIO/NITC. He’s been at the Commission a lot lately working on the grant project “Nebraska Schools and Libraries—Breaking the Ice and Igniting Internet Relationships.” You can learn all about it on the January 24th episode of NCompass Live.

Love this #BookFace & reading? We suggest checking out all the titles available for book clubs at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/ref/bookclub. Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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