NCompass Live: Librarian in Training – For Kids!

Learn how to inspire the next generation of library employees with ‘Librarian in Training – For Kids!’ on next week’s FREE NCompass Live webinar on Wednesday, December 11, 10:00am-11:00am CT.

In this session we will describe our Librarian In Training program. LIT is a 14 week program that invites kids between the ages of 9-12 to discover how libraries work, culminating in a celebration of the children’s dedication and service. LIT participants spend two weeks in every department of the library from circulation to maintenance, first meeting staff and discovering how each department operates, then completing a related project or assisting with specific tasks. LIT takes children beyond traditional job shadowing and allows them to contribute in a meaningful way to our library’s work.

Presenter: Jennifer Johnson, School Age Program Coordinator, Johnson City (TN) Public Library.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Dec. 18 – Advocates of All Ages: Recruiting and Retaining Younger Generations as Trustees and Friends
  • Tuesday, Dec. 24 – Pretty Sweet Tech – Watch Me Build a Virtual World Using A-Frame
  • Tuesday, Dec. 31 – Summer Reading Program 2020: Imagine Your Story
  • Jan. 8, 2020 – Rescheduled due to technical issues – United for Libraries – Trustees, Advocates, Friends, and Foundations: The Voice for America’s Libraries
  • Jan. 15, 2020 – Best New Children’s Books of 2019: Discovering New Books for the Young and the Young at Heart
  • Jan. 22, 2020 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Jan. 29, 2020 – Community Engagement: Straight Talk
  • Feb. 5, 2020 – Best New Teen Reads of 2019

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Pretty Sweet Tech: STEM Reading Lists

Happy Friday! This is going to be a short post because I just wanted to share a few of my favorite sites for STEM books and resources:

STEM Recommended Reading List for Coding & Robotics: This list from Make Wonder, the company that makes Cue, Dash and Dot robots, curates this awesome collection of books, separated by age range.

The National Science Teaching Association also has a list of books and resources for K-12. This list is curated by “volunteer educators, identified in cooperation with the Children’s Book Council”.
We Are Teachers offers a list of 50 STEM Books to teach science, technology, engineering and math.

Goodreads has a set of Listopia collections for STEM and STEAM fiction in just about every category you can imagine. This isn’t a professionally curated list, but there are some good picks with reader reviews available.

I’ll stop here because if I add more list options, you tend to see the same books over and over on every list. Happy reading everyone!

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Friday Reads: The Lady From the Black Lagoon

The Lady From the Black Lagoon is a biography, but it’s also not a biography. Sure, it’s the compelling life story of Milicent Patrick, a woman on both sides of the Old Hollywood camera. Milicent was a striking figure in front of the camera, but she was a real trailblazer in the world of make-up and design—specifically monster design, most notably, the Creature from The Black Lagoon. It’s also the story of her biggest fan, author Mallory O’Meara, and her quest to find out Milicent’s story, and her determination that Milicent get the credit she deserves for her work.

Along the way, O’Meara faces challenges. Milicent reinvented her identity many times, and used variations of her name personally and professionally–which was not unusual in Hollywood by any means, but it still poses research challenges. Luckily, O’Meara was already knowledgeable about Old Hollywood, and it was her voracious interest in old monster movies that led her to Milicent in the first place. O’Meara also gets some good research advice from some helpful librarians and archivists, which warmed this library worker’s heart.

This book is full of amazing stories. We get Milicent’s childhood years spent growing up on the Hearst Castle grounds, because her father was an engineer on that never-ending project. We also get the complicated family relationships that shaped Milicent’s life. We learn a lot about the behind-the-scenes production of Old Hollywood movies—and what a tough place it was for a woman to work, and how easy it was for Milicent’s labor to be exploited and almost erased. What really brings it all together, though, are the parallels that O’Meara is able to draw between her own career in movie production, with Milicent’s experience. O’Meara understands why Milicent chose to fight some battles and chose to walk away from others, and shares her own stories—some inspiring, some frustrating. (I have a guess who the unnamed voiceover jerk actor is, so let me know if you do, too.)

I listened to this book, and the author read it. That’s a risk—and in this case, it’s one that paid off! The author has a pleasant and clear voice, and her passion for her subject comes through loud and clear. After listening, I learned that it’s on many best-of lists for 2019, and I’m not surprised one bit.

O’Meara, Mallory. The Lady from the Black Lagoon: Hollywood Monsters and the Lost Legacy of Milicent Patrick. , 2019. Print.

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#BookFaceFriday – “Christmas Lights”

It’s the hap-hap-happiest #BookFaceFriday!

Looking for a heart-warming Christmas tale, a holiday romance, or a good Yuletide murder mystery? Take a peek at all of our holiday-themed book club kits!

These titles are very popular in November and December, with some book club groups reserving their choices up to a year in advance! NLC staff keep their eyes peeled for holiday-themed books year-round in order to meet the demand come the first snowfall. Reserve a holiday read like “Christmas Lights: A Novel” by Christine Pisera Naman ( Skyhorse, 2017) for your book club!

Christmas Lights is an inspiring, warm and tender read which could set your mood for the upcoming holiday.” —The Lakeland Times

This week’s #BookFace model is Kayla Henzel, NLC’s Administrative and Communications Staff Assistant.

Love this #BookFace & reading? Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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Throwback Thursday: Christmas Wish

We’re getting into the Christmas spirit with this week’s #ThrowbackThursday!

The young girl in this photo was a resident at the Nebraska Children’s Home Society. Her wish was for a family before Christmas and her wish was granted as she was adopted a week before the holiday.

This 3-3/4″ x 5-3/4″ black and white photograph is published and owned by the Nebraska Children’s Home Society. The NCHS was chartered September 1, 1893 by founders who had a vision for a better future and believed that every child deserved a family.

If you’re interested in seeing more Nebraska history, check out the Nebraska Memories archive.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Broadband Facts for Your County

Is your community wanting to work to improve the broadband speed in your library? Often times, library speeds lag behind what the community really needs, or the community might not understand how impactful improving the library internet might be. Sometimes, it is difficult to even determine what your community needs might be. One first step in having these conversations is to look over our now available broadband fact sheets. These are available for every county in Nebraska, and are intended to be used to help start community, county-wide or regional discussions about broadband availability, adoption, and digital inclusion. More information, including data sources and suggested discussion questions are also included. To view or download these, go to the main broadband page on the data services portion of our website. From there, you have the option to select by county, or pull up a map and click on a county for the fact sheets. The main page also has a broadband discussion guide, to help you with these conversations.

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CE Grants deadline extended! Now open to library science students!

The deadline to apply for this year’s CE Grants has been extended to January 17, 2020! This is an awesome opportunity to attend an out-of-state but nearby conference focused on rural and small libraries!

Applications for CE Grants to attend the ARSL 2020 conference are also now open to library science students! Applications are still open to those employed in an accredited public library and board members! Please see details in the links below.

This year, the Nebraska Library Commission is offering individuals $500 grants to attend the annual Association for Rural & Small Libraries (ARSL) 2020 Conference in Wichita, Kansas (Sept. 30th to Oct. 3rd)! Funding could go towards the cost of travel, hotel, meals, and/or registration costs.

CE grants are open to applicants who are either 1) currently employed in an accredited Nebraska public library at the time of application and for the duration of the conference, 2) a current board member of an accredited Nebraska public library at the time of application and for the duration of the conference, or 3) a student enrolled in a certificate or degree program with a concentration in library and information science or school library media at an accredited college or university for Fall 2020.

More details about the grant requirements, along with the application forms can be found in the links below.

If you have any questions, please contact Holli Duggan, CE Coordinator.

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CCC Library Information Services Classes

Central Community College announces classes for the Library and Information Services program for Spring 2020. Registration opens Nov. 14, 2019. There are six classes in the online program, which can be applied to a CCC Associate Degree.  See details of classes and registration information at:  http://www.cccneb.edu/library/

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NCompass Live: Libraries and the LGBT+ Experience

Learn how your library can be more welcoming through the experiences of the Olean Public and Cuba Circulating Libraries on next week’s FREE NCompass Live webinar, ‘Libraries and the LGBT+ Experience’ on Wednesday, December 4, 10:00am-11:00am CT.

These organizations are creating a more welcoming environment for the LGBTQIA community with programs, resources, and staff training.

Presenters: Tina Dalton, Library Director, Cuba (NY) Circulating Library, and Jennifer Stickles, Manager, Salamanca (NY) Public Library.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Dec. 11 – Librarian in Training – For Kids!
  • Dec. 18 – Advocates of All Ages: Recruiting and Retaining Younger Generations as Trustees and Friends
  • Tuesday, Dec. 24 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Tuesday, Dec. 31 – Summer Reading Program 2020: Imagine Your Story
  • Jan. 8, 2020 – Rescheduled due to technical issues – United for Libraries – Trustees, Advocates, Friends, and Foundations: The Voice for America’s Libraries

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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#BookFaceFriday – “Sport, Philosophy, and Good Lives”

Get your fat pants on and get ready to yell at the TV! It’s a football #BookFaceFriday!

Today, all across the state, families will get out the Thanksgiving leftovers and settle in to watch some football! And for those of you who aren’t, may we suggest settling in with a good book, like “Sport, Philosophy, and Good Lives” by Randolph Feezell (University of Nebraska Press, 2013.) The author is a professor of philosophy at Creighton University, who posits, “There’s more to sports than the ethos of competition, entertainment, and commercialism.” As part of our permanent collection, it’s available for check out to anyone. Just ask our amazing Information Services staff! This title is published by the University of Nebraska Press, which we collect from for our state document program.

Sport, Philosophy, and Good Lives provides illuminating discussion for those in sport studies (both undergraduate and graduate students, and scholars too) as well as general readers interested in reflecting on the meaning of sport.”—Douglas Hochstetler, Journal of Sport History

This week’s #BookFace model is Bruce Oorlog, NLC’s Mail/Material Specialist. He also happens to be quite the sports junkie, so we thought he was the perfect choice for this week’s model.

Love this #BookFace & reading? Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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Friday Reads: A Keeper by Graham Norton

I discovered Graham Norton watching his talk show on BBC America many years ago. I downloaded his latest novel, A Keeper, looking forward to another story set in Ireland where Norton was born and raised. A Keeper begins with Elizabeth Keene, a college professor living in New York City, separated from her husband, raising their 17-year-old son on her own. She returns to the house of her recently deceased mother in a small Irish village. While sorting, she discovers a group of letters that begin to reveal more questions than answers about Elizabeth’s uncertain paternity. The letters tell a story of Elizabeth’s mother Patricia, forty years earlier, communicating with a man named Edward Foley through a lonely-hearts ad in the Farmers’ Journal. When Elizabeth inherits a property that belonged to Edward Foley, she begins a journey to gather more information.

The novel weaves two stories labeled – NOW and THEN – with Elizabeth and Patricia respectively navigating their lives through difficult if not perilous circumstances. Elizabeth’s conversations with those who knew her mother and Edward Foley provide some never known information and with each new fact, there are more questions. A young Patricia arrives for a visit to meet Edward for a second date and his overbearing if not mentally deranged mother creates a scenario that is both unexpected and terrifying.

What Norton does so well in his books is reveal family secrets that are often difficult with deftness and humor. The inner thoughts of characters and dialog are strengths of his writing. Thinking I might be alone in my appreciation of his latest two fiction novels, I discovered A Keeper was shortlisted for in the fiction category for the National Book Awards and his first novel, Holding won an Irish Book Award for Popular Fiction. Graham Norton shows us his comic talent on his talk show but there is much more to him than witty banter. His writing and narration skills are also laudable.

Norton, Graham. A Keeper. Atria Books, 2019.

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Throwback Thursday: Dinner Time

Happy Thanksgiving from NLC! We’re celebrating the holiday with a #ThrowbackThursday!

We’re headed back to the 1950s with today’s #throwback. This image shows several women preparing food in the kitchen of the Nebraska Children’s Home Society. Many women volunteered on a regular basis.

This black and white photo is provided and owned by the Nebraska Children’s Home Society. Founders of the NCHS had a vision for a better future and believed that every child deserved a family. The agency has never charged fees for adoptions services, and still today relies primarily on private donations to fund its services.

Are you interested in Nebraska history? Check out the Nebraska Memories archive to see many more historical images digitized from photographs, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books, and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Pretty Sweet Tech: Design Thinking

Design Thinking is a method of problem-solving that puts the user first. For some, design thinking is the best thing since sliced bread. For others, it’s just a new label for the same old thing.

Here’s a diagram to give you a visual of the steps in design thinking:

Truth be told, design thinking originated in Stanford and has been around for two and a half decades, long enough to filter into other methods of problem-solving. Over the years, people have added different flavors, and applied the methodology in different contexts. More often than not, each new flavor is branded with a slightly different title and description.

So yes. This is my flavor: Design Thinking for Librarians. For one brief, shining moment I thought I had the greatest epiphany in the world. Then I did a quick Google search and found… Design Thinking for Librarians. But in a different flavor, made by librarians out of Denmark and Chicago. That one is wheat, and mine is a marble rye. Then I found ALA’s Design Thinking page on the Library of the Future page. Then I was just sourdough.

Then I dug a little deeper. These flavors of design thinking all stem from Stanford’s model, but appear drastically different based upon the setting. My flavor is adapted for selecting makerspace equipment in the library, as seen in this Design Thinking for Makerspaces worksheet. I also made a worksheet for Design Thinking for Websites over the years.

My point is that theories branch off into a million different things. Just because two websites have the same name does not mean they contain the same information, nor should they necessarily be applied to the same subject matter. Yet, everybody has a valid point to make in their application. There is enough Design Thinking for Libraries to go around. And around. And Around. The process isn’t linear, it’s iterative design.

To learn more, check out the NCompass Live show I did earlier today on Design Thinking.

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Young Readers Invited to Write to Favorite Authors

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
November 25, 2019

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Tessa Terry
402-471-3434
800-307-2665

Young Readers Invited to Write to Favorite Authors

Young readers in grades 4-12 are invited to write a personal letter to an author for the Nebraska Letters about Literature (LAL) contest, a state reading and writing promotion program. The letter can be to any author (living or dead) from any genre-fiction or nonfiction, contemporary or classic-explaining how that author’s work changed the student’s view of the world. Nebraska Letters About Literature is coordinated and sponsored by the Nebraska Center for the Book and the Nebraska Library Commission, with support from Houchen Bindery, Ltd., Humanities Nebraska, and Chapters Bookstore in Seward.

The Nebraska Center for the Book’s panel of judges will select a winner and alternate per competition level (Level I for grades 4-6, Level II for grades 7-8, and Level III for grades 9-12) to be honored in a proclamation-signing ceremony at the state capitol during National Library Week in April 2020. Their winning letters will be placed in the Jane Pope Geske Heritage Room of Nebraska Authors at Bennett Martin Public Library in Lincoln. Nebraska winners and alternates will receive state prizes.

Teachers, librarians, and parents can download the contest guidelines, free teaching materials, information on the online entry system, and past winning letters on the Nebraska Center for the Book website. Get inspired by listening to past Nebraska winners, Ashley Xiques and Sydney Kohl, read and talk about their letters on NET Radio’s All About Books (netnebraska.org/basic-page/radio/all-about-books). Submissions must be completed online by January 15, 2020. For more information contact Tessa Terry, 402-471-3434 or 800-307-2665.

The Nebraska Center for the Book is housed at the Nebraska Library Commission and brings together the state’s readers, writers, booksellers, librarians, publishers, printers, educators, and scholars to build the community of the book, supporting programs to celebrate and stimulate public interest in books, reading, and the written word. The Nebraska Center for the Book is supported by the Nebraska Library Commission.

As the state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services, “bringing together people and information.”

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases .

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NCompass Live: Pretty Sweet Tech – Design Thinking: How Technology is Made

‘Design Thinking: How Technology is Made’ is the topic of next week’s FREE NCompass Live webinar, on Wednesday, November 27, 10:00am-11:00am CT.

New special monthly episodes of NCompass Live! Join the NLC’s Technology Innovation Librarian, Amanda Sweet, as she guides us through the world of library-related Pretty Sweet Tech.

In recent years we’ve all been hearing more about “design thinking”. Fun fact! It’s not a new process. It’s just problem solving. You probably already use it, but may know it under a different term. The difference is that design thinking puts the user first. That’s right, humans matter in technology design. It’s a novel idea.

This week’s Pretty Sweet Tech aims to de-mystify design thinking and how technology is designed, prototyped and tested. When we know how technology is made, we all have a better chance to choose and use technology more effectively. Here’s a rundown of what this session will cover:

  • What is Design Thinking?
  • Example as it applies to technology design
  • Using Design Thinking to Choose Technology Tools
  • Using Design Thinking to Teach Technology Literacy

Let’s get together and build people-first technology. Make technology mean something.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Dec. 4 – Libraries and the LGBT+ Experience
  • Dec. 11 – Librarian in Training – For Kids!
  • Dec. 18 – Advocates of All Ages: Recruiting and Retaining Younger Generations as Trustees and Friends
  • Tuesday, Dec. 24 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Tuesday, Dec. 31 – Summer Reading Program 2020: Imagine Your Story
  • Jan. 8, 2020 – Rescheduled due to technical issues – United for Libraries – Trustees, Advocates, Friends, and Foundations: The Voice for America’s Libraries

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: “Hag-Seed” by Margaret Atwood

Let me set the scene for you. Felix, is a disgraced theatrical director, down on his luck, he applies to teach a prison literacy program. He has faded into obscurity after suffering personal loss and professional betrayal. As a result, a motley group of prisoners takes on Felix’s challenge of performing “The Tempest” to earn themselves credit in the literacy program. A play Felix has become slightly obsessed with after the fall of his career. Not only do you get to experience the play re-told but also from behind the curtain, an angle only those on the stage usually have access to. Prepare yourself for an interesting and diverse cast of characters, dark plot twists, redemption, and in true Shakespeare fashion, revenge.

I’m always in favor of a good classic transformed, and Margaret Atwood does an exceptional job of bringing “The Tempest” into the 21st century with her novel “Hag-Seed: William Shakespeare’s The Tempest Retold” (Hogarth, 2016.) The novel is a part of Random House’s Hogarth Shakespeare series, where well-known authors re-tell one of Shakespeare’s plays. So for those of you who are fans of”West Side Story,” “Ten Things I Hate About You,” or “She’s the Man,” this is really a series you should check out.

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#BookFaceFriday – “Small Public Library Management”

There’s nothing like a little Library Science on a #BookFaceFriday!

Did you know the Commission has a collection of library science titles? Our Library Science Collection provides professional and reference materials for Nebraska librarians and library science programs. This includes all librarians and library science students. Checkout period is 4 weeks, and items can be sent through the mail or picked up in person. An especially pertinent title for Nebraska is “Small Public Library Management” by Jane Pearlmutter and Paul Nelson (American Library Association Editions, 2012.)

“Highly recommended to any small public library administrator it will have a permanent place on this reviewer’s nightstand.”Booklist

This week’s #BookFace model is Cathy Hatterman, NLC’s Acquisitions Librarian. Cathy orders books and magazines for the Library of Congress collection, as well as for the Reference collection, and any special orders needed.

Love this #BookFace & reading? Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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Throwback Thursday: Magee’s

Check out this #ThrowbackThursday from Nebraska Memories!

This week’s #throwback features the Magee’s building on O Street in Lincoln back in the 1930s. This three-story building still stands today and is occupied by Pearl Vision and other tenants.

This 5″x8″ acetate negative is owned by Townsend Studio. Townsend studio has been in continuous operation since it was founded in 1888. The studio holds a collection of glass plate and acetate negatives of early Lincoln and early residents. Images also include University of Nebraska and high school sports teams, state governors and Lincoln mayors.

Check out this collection and more on the Nebraska Memories archive.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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A History of the Census in the United States : Part 6

The Sixth Census: Census Day was June 1, 1840.

Martin Van Buren was President of the United States on Census Day, June 1, 1840.

Authorizing Legislation

The Census Act of 1840 (signed into law on March 3, 1839 and amended by an act of February 26, 1840) authorized establishing a centralized census office during each enumeration. Congress left the design of the questionnaire to the discretion of the secretary of state, but specified that inquiries be made of each household. Subjects among the inquiries were to include “the pursuits, industry, education, and resources of the country.” New population inquiries included questions about school attendance, literacy, and vocation.

Enumeration

The administration of the sixth census was very similar to that of the fifth. Enumeration began on June 1, 1840. Marshals were to receive two copies of the census receipts from enumerators by November 1, 1840, one of which was to be sent to the secretary of state by December 1, 1840.

Further Information

Information provided from Census.gov

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Continuing Education: Eliminating Fines

Eliminating library fines has been getting more and more attention lately.

Chicago recently eliminated late fees and “[t]he number of book returns has since increased 240%” (Forbes, 2019). Denver also announced back in January that they were going fine free and “zeroing out most customers’ existing overdue balances so they can start fresh” (Denver Library, 2019) citing their belief in “free and equal access for all.” Some libraries, like Lincoln City Libraries, are eliminating late fees for youth materials which are “an unnecessary barrier for children who often lack the autonomy or ability to return library materials on time, and for families who cannot afford to pay them” (Lincoln City Libraries, 2019). The idea behind eliminating fines really goes back to increasing access and breaking down barriers for library users. But is this the right move for every library? How do you decide or implement this kind of initiative?

There are many arguments for and against eliminating library fines, but if you’ve been having this discussion in your library or are interested in finding out more, the resources and webinars below should help start your search.

Purple background. Text in lower right corner "To fine or not to fine?" light green bottom border with text "Eliminating library fines." Left side of image alternating icons of coins and books.

Resources:

Webinars:

  • Upcoming Nov. 20th – “Eliminating Fines: A win-win for your library and community” (Infopeople)
    • “You will hear how eliminating fines can lead to an increase in library use and circulation, with no negative effects.”
  • Recorded – “NCompass Live: Eliminating Late Fines is a Win-Win for Your Library and Community” (NLC)
    • “In this session, Beth [Crist] and Meg [DePriest] will review the research and results from the growing number of libraries across the country that have ditched late fines and coaxed new and former users to their doors. They will share talking points, tips, and an advocacy tool you can use to build a case to eliminate fines in your library.”
  • Recorded – “Fine-Free Future” (RIPL)
    • “This webinar brings together three experienced library directors who have recently eliminated some or all overdue fines at their libraries to discuss the strategies they used in their communities, the arguments for and against the elimination of fines, their plans to measure impact and success, and how they communicate the issue of overdue fines as critical to any library’s mission of equal access and social equity.”
  • Recorded – “Planning and Implementing a Fine-Free Policy” (Florida Library Webinars)
    • “Libraries are ready for a change! Our academic library went fine free in 2016, and we’re not alone. In this informative and interactive program, we will share why and how we managed to eliminate most overdue fines, aligning our circulation policies with the needs of our most frequent users…Policies and methods from public libraries will also be included!”

For webinars and CE: If you would like to earn continuing education (CE) credit and are enrolled in the Nebraska Public Librarian Certification program, please submit a “CE Activity Report Form” after each webinar.

If you have any questions about continuing education, please contact Holli Duggan.

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