NCompass Live: Coding Corner @ Your Library

NCompass live small

Join us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Coding Corner @ Your Library”, on Wednesday, August 31, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

In 2014, the Abrahams Branch of the Omaha Public Library launched a computer coding program for kids. With the help of local computer educators, we are teaching kids computer coding through 4-week & 2-week classes and a national chapter of the Girls Who Code club. Learn how we developed the programs and recruited teachers/volunteers on a shoe string budget.

Presenter: Marvel Maring, Branch Manager, South Omaha (NE) Library.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Sept. 7 – The Story of Trading Stories, A Native American Film Festival
  • Sept. 14 – Nebraska 150 Books: Read Nebraska Authors with your book group!
  • Sept. 21 – One Book For Nebraska Kids & One Book For Nebraska Teens

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: The Celestial Railroad

Like Leonard Nimoy and Thin Lizzy, Nathaniel Hawthorne is somewhat unfairly judged on the basis of his one big hit.  I’d wager that lots of you were forced to read The Scarlet Letter at some point in your school days and, like me, did not find it magnificent.  Letter is a great book to teach, as it makes literary mechanics very noticeable.  But it’s not particularly fun to read, especially when you’re a teen.  The prose is dense, words piled high as Hawthorne describes hats and tunics in obsessive detail, and there’s plenty of moralizing.   The book’s merits are buried behind the walls of text.

Celestial Railroad book coverThankfully, Hawthorne covered a lot of the same themes in his short stories.  The excesses that sometimes hampered his novels are excised and what’s left is relatively trim and reader-friendly.  There are many echoes of Letter here.  Sin and conscience are examined in “Roger Malvin’s Burial”.  “The Maypole of Merry Mount” analyzes Puritan society and its distaste for good times.  There’s a much better symbol than an A in “The Minister’s Black Veil”.  And, though the stories fluctuate in quality, the writing throughout is less laborious than anything in his novels.   Hawthorne was a guy writing stories in the 1800s and the stories were mostly about the 1600s and 1700s, so it’s unfair to expect him to read like Janet Evanovich.  But the prose here has some life and sometimes he even dips into very black humor:

“[T]here sat the light-heeled reprobate in the stocks; or if he danced, it was round the whipping post, which might be termed the Puritan Maypole.”

Yikes!  My favorite aspect of these stories is the treatment of the Puritans.  Hawthorne was viewing America’s past from the rapidly-changing nineteenth century.  Transcendentalists like Emerson and Thoreau were popularizing sensitive, romantic spirituality—pretty much the polar opposite of hard, cold Puritanism.  And yet Hawthorne never really depicts Puritans as simply primitives or America’s embarrassing, witch-hating grandparents.   He portrays the past in an even-handed way, not as a bunch of villains and their victims: the “immitigable zealots” of “Merry Mount” are also the anti-despots of “The Gray Champion”.   Both good and bad get their time in the spotlight.  Scarlet Letter and House of Seven Gables covered much of the same ground, but it’s conveyed more effectively in these short stories.

If you have sad memories of Hawthorne, I’d recommend giving a collection like this a try.  It sometimes pays to give the classics a second look.

Hawthorne, N. (2006). The celestial railroad, and other stories. New York: Signet Classics.

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Tip #3 for Nebraska Libraries on the Web

Nebraska Libraries on the WebQuick Tip #3: Publicize with Jetpack

If you’ve been working to add content to both your website and your social networks, there’s an easier way. In your Dashboard, there’s a section for the Jetpack plugin. Among Jetpack’s settings is the Publicize feature. Just click Configure and you’ll be able to connect your website to Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, and more. Anything that you add to the site will be automatically pushed out to those social networks, so that your viewers will be able to see all of your announcements and photos, no matter which of your sites they’re using. Jetpack also includes sharing buttons that can be added to your posts, so that your readers can easily share your content on their own social networks.Wordpress Publicize Graphic

Learn more about Nebraska Libraries on the Web in our previous Blog posts or contact Craig Lefteroff, or by phone at (402) 471-3106. For more information on the service or to view our current sites, please visit http://libraries.ne.gov/projectblog/.

Improve your site with Jetpack graphic

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Throwback Thursday: Interior photo of YMCA, Omaha, Nebraska

YMCAt

Postcard of a interior photo of the Omaha, Nebraska YMCA, approximate date early 1900’s.

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Continuing Education Grants – ARSL 2016 Conference

Continuing Education Grants are now available! These grants are available for Nebraska public librarians to attend the Association for Rural & Small Libraries (ARSL) annual conference in Fargo, ND (October 27th-29th).

Applications must be submitted electronically by September 6th!

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What’s Sally Reading?

Spoilers for Award-Winning Books

One of the founders of the 5 Minute Librarian blog page noted in an email to YALSA-BK that she learned last fall that just in the YA genre alone, 5,000 books are published each year, and no one can read them all before the next year’s titles begin to pile up.  So here is the solution, visit Spoilers, Sweetie!  a new blog that spills the beans on award-winning titles for children and teens that you may not have time to read.

I appreciated that when you click on a category, say YALSA Nonfiction Award 2016, the title and author come up accompanied by a gray box.  To read the spoiler just click on the box.  This way you do not accidently uncover a spoiler you didn’t want to see.  Readers of the blog are also invited to join the team and help provide spoilers for others.

Another portion of this web site has a chronological listing of book awards and when they are announced.  Also handy information.

Stower025Troll and the Oliver by Adam Stower is a picture book for preschool through first grade.  Every day, usually around noon, Troll tried to catch Oliver and eat him!  Every day Oliver was too fast and agile and he always got away.  One day Troll did not jump out to try to catch him.  Oliver was very cautious on the way home.  He decided Troll had given up and began to mix ingredients for cake.  Then Troll jumped out of the cupboard and gulped down Oliver!  He tasted terrible so Troll spit him out again.  Luckily the timer dinged and out came cake!  As it turns out trolls love cake so Oliver & Troll share the cake with each other.  Clever—the world is a better place with trolls full of cake!

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

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Free Class: Health and Wellness @ the Library : The Essentials of Providing Consumer Health Services

NNLM_LogoThis fall you have two ways to take Health and Wellness @ the Library: The Essentials of Providing Consumer Health Services from NN/LM MCR staff.

  • 5 week online course for 12 MLA CE hours, September 7 – October 7, 2016
  • 4 hour in-person NLA pre-conference for 4 MLA CE hours, October 19, 2016


Here’s the description for the NLA pre-conference:

Are you interested in starting or improving consumer health services in your library? Then this workshop is for you! We will define the core competencies of providing consumer health information services, and then dive directly into the essential skills and knowledge that library staff need to build those competencies. The class will begin with tools to learn the demographics and health status of people in your community. Together we will examine issues of literacy, health literacy, and the health information needs of special populations. From there we will explore authoritative resources for just about any type of health question, apps and mobile health technologies, how people are using social networking for health questions, and how to create fun and informative health-related programming for different populations in your community. Participants are encouraged to bring laptops or tablets for hands-on exercises. This course provides 4 CE credits towards the Consumer Health Information Specialization certificate.

For more information about the NLA pre-conference, visit http://www.nebraskalibraries.org/page/Neblib2016PreConf and look for “Health and Wellness @ the Library: The Essentials of Providing Consumer Health Services.” There is no additional registration fee for this pre-conference.

For more information about the 5 week online course, visit https://nnlm.gov/mcr/news_blog/2016/08/consumer-health-information-specializationmedical-library-association-ce-offering/. You do need to register, but there is no fee.

 

Christian Minter, christian.minter@unmc.edu

Annette Parde-Maass, AnnetteParde-Maass@creighton.edu

Education and Outreach Coordinators

National Network of Libraries of Medicine

 

Check out the Bringing Health Information to the Community (BHIC) Blog, http://nnlm.gov/bhic/

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Free Webinar : Resources for Addressing Community Health Needs

NNLM_LogoResources for Addressing Community Health Needs

 

 

August 24, 2016 1:00 pm MT/ 2:00 pm CThttps://webmeeting.nih.gov/mcr2

Presenter: Dana Abbey, Community Engagement Coordinator, NN/LM MCR

There are numerous factors that have the potential to influence the health of your community members including quality of life, health behaviors, utilization of and access to health care, social and economic factors, and the physical environment.

In this hands-on session you will:

  • Utilize tools for researching these factors at the local level.
  • Identify authoritative health information resources for program planning.
  • Identify potential community partners.

Who should attend?

  • Public libraries and community organizations planning health outreach activities.
  • K-12 staff involved in student health care and/or health and science curriculums (librarians, nurses, teachers).
  • Public health grant writers.
  • Anyone who interested in knowing about these great resources.

No registration is required. MLA CE credit is available upon completion of webinar evaluation.

Christian Minter, christian.minter@unmc.edu
Annette Parde-Maass, AnnetteParde-Maass@creighton.edu
Education and Outreach Coordinators
National Network of Libraries of Medicine,
Midcontinental Region

Check out the Bringing Health Information to the Community (BHIC) Blog, http://nnlm.gov/bhic/

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National Library of Medicine New Director

NLMLogoOn September 12, 2016, Dr. Patricia Flatley Brennan will be sworn in as the new Directory of the National Library of Medicine (NLM). You can read about Dr. Brennan’s credentials and accomplishments and watch a video about her vision for the NLM on the NLM in Focus blog. The 3-minute video highlights a number of roles the NLM plays in advancing health, many of which can be extrapolated to apply to local libraries as well. As Dr. Brennan states, “We’re going to have a new understanding of what is health…and the Library will be at the center of making sure that’s accessible and understandable.”

~Annette Parde-Maass
Education and Outreach Coordinator
National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region
https://nnlm.gov/mcr

 

 

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Plotting the Route: Maps of the Missouri River

The summer I turned ten, my family drove from Montana to northern California to visit my grandparents. My dad put me in charge of plotting our route. This was pre-GPS. I actually had to look at the road atlas. Unfortunately, my dad rejected many of suggestions. I think it had something to do with the fact that some of them would have taken us through North and South Dakota, Wyoming, Utah and Colorado – not exactly most the direct way to travel from Montana to California. Regardless, I found I enjoyed looking at maps. Something I still like to do.

Maps do more than tell us how to get from one place to another. Depending on the map, they can convey informationMap of Omaha City, Nebraska  like elevation, land use, socio-economic levels. If they are maps of bodies of water, they mark the locations of navigational hazards, ship wrecks and water depth. In some cases, we can use maps to show how rivers have changed their course over time or the evolution of land use in an area. Nebraska Memories features several maps and an atlas or two.

Maps depict more than geography. Some focus on the mundane and the ordinary, such as city planning. For example, this map of Omaha from 1866 shows the city laid out in a grid pattern. While the city blocks are numbered, individual owners are not named. With a little help from a Polk Directory and/or the Census, you could figure out who lived where. Regardless, this map provides us with plenty of information — it shows the location of Nebraska’s first capitol building at Twentieth and Dodge Streets. It also tells us the Omaha experienced some flooding during its early years. How do I know? The map marks the locations of several levees along Omaha’s eastern boundary. Also, the cemeteries are located on the western edge of Omaha, far from the Missouri River.

Map of the Missouri River from surveys made, in accordance with acts of Congress approved June 18, 1878 and March 3, 1879, under the direction of Major Chas. R. SuterSpeaking of the Missouri River,  two atlases chart the course of the Missouri River from its mouth to its source in Three Forks, Montana.  Both the Map of the Missouri River from its Mouth to Three Forks, Montana and the Map of the Missouri River from surveys made, in accordance with acts of Congress approved June 18, 1878 and March 3, 1879 under the direction of Major Chas. R. Sutter show an amazing amount of detail.

Map of the Missouri River: from its mouth to Three Forks, Montana These maps plot the locations of islands, sandbars, vegetation, the locations of previous channels and much, much more. The Map of the Missouri River from its Mouth to Three Forks, Montana also notes  Indian settlements, wood yards, and large ranches. Since the maps are drawn as though you are looking at them from above, it’s like looking at the nineteenth-century version of a Google map.

Map of the Missouri River: from its mouth to Three Forks, Montana

Maps, like old photographs and postcards allow us to travel into the past. We not only see how rivers have changed course or how cities have evolved, we catch a glimpse of what mattered to the mapmakers. Since the Missouri River was a major transportation route, these mapmakers were focused on documenting navigational hazards, woodlots, and Indian settlements. They wanted to ensure that riverboats would be able to navigate safely, as well as resupply as necessary. Looking back on that long ago road trip to California, the maps we used may not have contained the same sorts of information as the ones found within Nebraska Memories, but they provided us with the information we needed.

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

 

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NCompass Live: Making the Most of Maker Camp at Your Library

NCompass live small

Join us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Making the Most of Maker Camp at Your Library”, on Wednesday, August 24, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Discover hints and tips for conducting a successful Maker Camp at your library! Find out what goes in to planning, gathering materials, and promoting a Maker Camp and also get some great ideas for projects that work well in a library setting and within a budget.

Presenters: Megan Boggs, Seward (NE) Memorial Library and Joseph Chapman, Geneva (NE) Public Library.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • August 31 – Coding Corner @ Your Library
  • Sept. 7 – The Story of Trading Stories, A Native American Film Festival
  • Sept. 14 – Nebraska 150 Books: Read Nebraska Authors with your book group!

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil

What do the following have in common?

  • An outrageous, irrepressible drag queenA piano-playing attorney who stays one step ahead of creditors by serially squatting in local mansions
  • An antiques dealer tried for one murder four times over nine years who enlists the help of a local voodoo priestess in his defense
  • The gravesites of song writer Johnny Mercer and poet Conrad Aiken
  • A college bulldog mascot dressed for game day in suit and tie
  • A local debutante whose mother hires Peter Duchin and his orchestra for her party
  • A failed inventor who reportedly possesses a poison powerful enough to spike the water supply and kill everyone in town
  • A pianist/singer who knows 6,000 songs by heart and recognizes no speed limit when driving from gig to gig

All of these characters and situations – and more – appear in the novelized, non-fiction book Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt. The author, a magazine writer in New York City for decades, discovered the magic of airline supersaver fares in the early 1980s which offered travel to U.S. cities for less than the nouvelle cuisine restaurant meals he critiqued. Through cheap travel to a sampling of continental U.S. cities, the author finds himself drawn more and more to Savannah, Georgia with its charms and eccentricities, so much so that he finally ends up living more of the year there than in NYC.

This title happens to be the one our Nebraska Library Commission book club will be discussing at its August session (and we have a book club kit in case your local group would like to read it). From shocking, to laugh-out-loud funny, the book manages to draw in the reader into the lives of the characters. Ultimately, Savannah itself becomes a character. Its history is fascinating. One example is that fact that, through southern charm and good manners, the then-mayor managed to talk the union general Sherman out of burning the city to ground in his march across the south.

The city itself, however, is not all charm and hospitality, with its beautiful squares that form the basis of the “old” Savannah. The city has traditionally stiff-armed any attempts to bring in local economic development and any chain stores. Such entities moved on up or down the road to Augusta or Atlanta. But the lack of economic opportunity, the still-present stratification of society along black and white lines certainly contributed to Savannah being named “Murder Capital of the U.S.” at one point.

Give it a try. I think you will be charmed, shocked and tickled with Mr. Berendt’s loving yet dispassionate treatment of Savannah. It certainly has led me to put the city on my list of must-see places sometime in my life.

 

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Tip #2 for Nebraska Libraries on the Web

Nebraska Libraries on the Web

Quick Tip #2: Create a page that points directly to another website

When you add a new page to your site (by going to Pages -> Add New), WordPress assumes that you’re creating a new standalone page to add to your site. But you can also create an empty “placeholder” page that will send visitors out to another website—say, your Facebook page or the website for your town or county. To do this, simply scroll down to the bottom of the screen and, in the Page Links To section, choose A Custom URL. Once you have your new “page” created, you can easily add it to your site’s menu!

Learn more about Nebraska Libraries on the Web in our previous Blog posts or contact Craig Lefteroff, or by phone at (402) 471-3106. For more information on the service or to view our current sites, please visit http://libraries.ne.gov/projectblog/.

Create a page that points directly to another website.

 

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Throwback Thursday: Lincoln City Hall

City hall 2001

Picture postcard of the exterior of the Lincoln City Hall, approximate date early 1900’s.

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NCompass Live: Nebraska 150 Books: Celebrating Nebraska’s Sesquicentennial Through Literature

NCompass live small

Join us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Nebraska 150 Books: Celebrating Nebraska’s Sesquicentennial Through Literature”, on Wednesday, August 17, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Nebraska 150 Books is a community reading initiative held in conjunction with the Nebraska 150 Sesquicentennial Celebration. This reading program provides the opportunity for Nebraskans to recognize our shared heritage through books. The power of literature to help us understand culture, community and a shared history is the impetus behind the Nebraska 150 Books project. In this program, you will learn the process for developing a compelling reading list, how to create a successful marketing campaign for a community reading initiative, and how to get readers excited about regional authors and their books!

Presenters: Erin Willis, Curator, Heritage Room of Nebraska Authors, Bennett Martin Public Library and Judy Keetle, Chair, Nebraska 150 Books Selection Committee.

  • August 24 – Making the Most of Maker Camp at Your Library
  • August 31 – Coding Corner @ Your Library
  • Sept. 7 – The Story of Trading Stories, A Native American Film Festival
  • Sept. 14 – Nebraska 150 Books: Read Nebraska Authors with your book group!

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads : The Little Paris Bookshop

ParisBookshop“Monsieur Perdu calls himself a literary apothecary. From his floating bookstore in a barge on the Seine, he prescribes novels for the hardships of life. Using his intuitive feel for the exact book a reader needs, Perdu mends broken hearts and souls. The only person he can’t seem to heal through literature is himself; he’s still haunted by heartbreak after his great love disappeared. She left him with only a letter, which he has never opened.

After Perdu is finally tempted to read the letter, he hauls anchor and departs on a mission to the south of France, hoping to make peace with his loss and discover the end of the story. Joined by a bestselling but blocked author and a lovelorn Italian chef, Perdu travels along the country’s rivers, dispensing his wisdom and his books, showing that the literary world can take the human soul on a journey to heal itself.

Internationally bestselling and filled with warmth and adventure, The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George is a love letter to books,” a masterpiece of character description, and “meant for anyone who believes in the power of stories to shape people’s lives.”

Reprinted from Amazon.

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Tips for Nebraska Libraries on the Web: Create a New Menu

Nebraska Libraries on the Web

Create a MenuQuick Tip #1: Create a new menu

The menu at the top of your WordPress site allows your visitors to easily find particular pages, but occasionally you might want to change it up (perhaps during summer reading). With WordPress, it’s easy to create multiple menus and swap them out at will. On your Dashboard, go to Appearance, then click on Menus. Your default menu will probably display on the screen, but you can click Create a New Menu and add selected pages and resources to it. Once you name it and save it, the menu will be available in the Customizer on your site (Appearance -> Customize). You can then swap out your default menu for the new menu with one click.

Learn more about Nebraska Libraries on the Web in our previous Blog posts or contact Craig Lefteroff, or by phone at (402) 471-3106. For more information on the service or to view our current sites, please visit http://libraries.ne.gov/projectblog/.

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Get Your Library Ready for the Total Solar Eclipse — August 21, 2017

StarnetAre you ready for the celestial event of the century? In just over a year from now (August 21, 2017), the shadow of the moon will sweep across the United States from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean in a spectacle that hasn’t occurred in 99 years! The National Center for Interactive Learning (NCIL) at the Space Science Institute has recently been awarded a grant for its NASA@ My Library program. Partners include NASA, ALA, The Girl Scouts, SETI, and many other organizations. The STAR Library Education Network (STAR_Net) is managed by NCIL. The STAR_Net team wants to work with your library and thousands of others to participate in this national event. Some fortunate libraries will be able to experience a total solar eclipse though every library in the country will observe at least a partial eclipse.

So jump on the eclipse train!

Go to: Eclipse Registration to register your library.

We will, in turn, let you know how to access the following valuable resources:

· Vetted Multimedia for Programming/Promotion (Images, Video, Animations, Artwork)

· Media Template Package (Press Release, PSA, Community Letter, Media Alert)

· Private Eclipse Forum (registered libraries)

· Inclusion in Special Eclipse Promotions (Social Media, Blogs, Newsletters, etc.)

· Enrollment in STAR_Net’s Eclipse Newsletter

When your eclipse event is planned, you can share your press release, flyer, website link, or like material with us to receive 50 free Solar Shades for your patrons to watch along with us! (shades are available on a first come, first serve basis).

The STAR Library Education Network (STAR_Net) is supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation and other funders. STAR stands for Science-Technology Activities and Resources. This ground-breaking program includes a traveling STEM exhibition program, the development of STEM activities for public libraries, a comprehensive training program that includes in-person workshops and webinars, the development of the STAR_Net Online Community, and a research and evaluation program. STAR_Net is led by the Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning. Partners include the American Library Association, Lunar and Planetary Institute, and the Afterschool Alliance along with many other organizations.

www.starnetlibraries.org

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Throwback Thursday: Nebraska State Penitentiary

Penetentiary001

Picture postcard of the exterior of the Nebraska State Penitentiary.  Written on the postcard is Dinner Hour at the Nebraska Penitentiary.  Approximate date is early 1900’s.

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Moodle Course on Refugee Health — “From Beyond Our Borders: Providing Multilingual and Multicultural Health Information”

NNLM-LOGO-MiddleAtlantic-BlueThe (NN/LM), Middle Atlantic Region (MAR) invites you to this 3 week self-paced, asynchronous introduction to cultural competency, the unique health information needs of refugees and immigrants, and relevant health information resources:

From Beyond Our Borders: Providing Multilingual and Multicultural Health Information

August 15th, 2016 – September 6th, 2016

This class is designed to assist librarians and others who work with diverse populations in locating health information. The resources presented are selected for their emphasis on providing culturally relevant information in the preferred language of the population. Background information on refugees and immigrants in the U.S. and their unique health issues will be presented. Participants will have the opportunity to become familiar with the features and scope of several Internet resources. The class will be taught via Moodle and includes short readings, videos, and activities.

This class has been approved for 4 hours of continuing education credits by the Medical Library Association for each part and is eligible for MLA Level I and Level II CHIS.

Register: https://nnlm.gov/ntc/classes/class_details.html?class_id=485

Course Contact: Kate Flewelling, NN/LM MAR

Regional Contact: Annette Parde-Maass, NN/LM MCR

Annette Parde-Maass

Education and Outreach Coordinator

National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region

Creighton University Health Sciences Library

AnnetteParde-Maass@creighton.edu

402.280.4156

 

Check out the Bringing Health Information to the Community (BHIC) Blog, http://nnlm.gov/bhic/

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