NCompass Live: Strategic Planning in a Nutshell

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Strategic Planning in a Nutshell”, on Wednesday, February 4, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

Do you have a plan? The new Nebraska Guidelines for Public Library Accreditation require that a library have an up-to-date strategic plan in place. The new guidelines are community-based, so libraries need to know what their communities’ needs are in order to provide appropriate library services that meet those unique needs. That’s where planning comes in. Richard Miller, NLC’s Library Development Director, will guide you through Strategic Planning for your library. Public Library Directors, Staff and Library Board Members are encouraged to attend.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • February 11 – Fun with Friends: Integrating Programming for Adults with Special Needs Into Your Library
  • February 18 – Anatomy of an Ad Campaign
  • February 25 – Tech Talk with Michael Sauers
  • March 4 – Thirteen Things You Might Not Know About National Library of Medicine Resources
  • March 11 – Getting More $$ from Your Book Sales OR Is This Old Book Valuable?

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

 

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Friday Reads: The Reluctant Widow, by Georgette Heyer

ReluctantWidowThis past week, I was looking for comfort reading while I was home with a bad cold. I suppose everyone has their own requirements for a good comfort read.  For me, that’s almost always an old friend—a book that I’ve enjoyed before.  And if I’ve enjoyed the book previously, then the unfolding of the plot and the building of suspense aren’t so important as how those things happen, so language, the setting, and the way the author discloses details become more important.  Humor is good—and a good-humored outlook is essential.  The characters are important—I want to visit with friends.

Georgette Heyer fills the bill. Ms. Heyer had a long career, writing over 50 novels, a few historicals, some contemporary mysteries, and many titles in the genre she is best known for, the Regency romance.  Many of her Regencies include elements of mystery or suspense (e.g. The Toll-Gate.)  All include a lot of accurate period detail (An Infamous Army includes a recounting of the Battle of Waterloo and has a formidable bibliography.)  Most important, the books are full of witty banter, attractive characters, and fun.  Ms. Heyer herself once said “I think myself I ought to be shot for writing such nonsense, but it’s unquestionably good escapist literature; & I think I should rather like it if I were sitting in an air-raid shelter, or recovering from flu.”

The Reluctant Widow starts with a “meet cute” that’s tough to swallow, but Ms. Heyer brings it off. Elinor Rochdale, a lady fallen on hard times, travels to take up a post as a governess and finds herself, by mistake, at the home of Lord Ned Carlyon, who was expecting a woman who had agreed to marry his dissolute cousin, Eustace Cheviot, so that Ned could avoid inheriting Eustace’s estate. The situation is desperate as word comes that Eustace has been fatally wounded and lies dying.  Elinor is convinced against her better judgment to marry and becomes a widow overnight.  After that, a stolen secret memorandum, a dog named Bouncer, and a midnight intruder keep the book moving along briskly.  And since it says right on the cover of the book that it’s a Romance, “will Elinor and Ned get together in the end?” is not really a question.

The book is almost 70 years old, but its charm is still fresh and engaging. Readers of Romance, Historical fiction, or even Napoleonic War buffs might enjoy it.  A number of Georgette Heyer’s books are available through Nebraska OverDrive.

 

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Throwback Thursday: NLC staff photo, 1993

Staff

Nebraska Library Commission staff posing at entrance to NLC in the Atrium Building, 1993.

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ProQuest K12 Databases Trial

ProQuest is offering two months of trial access to their most popular K12 databases:

  • CultureGrams
  • eLibrary
  • eLibrary Science
  • Government Reporter
  • History Study Center
  • Learning: Literature
  • ProQuest Research Companion
  • SIRS Decades
  • SIRS Discoverer
  • SIRS Issues Researcher
  • SIRS Renaissance
  • SIRS WebSelect

Trial Dates: January 27, 2015 through March 27, 2015

Trial access instructions were distributed via a January 28, 2015 message to the TRIAL mailing list. If you did not receive this information and would like to have it sent to you, please email Susan Knisely.

Want to receive email notification of future database trials and discounted pricing? Make sure you are signed up for the Nebraska Library Commission’s TRIAL mailing list. you can learn more about mailing lists maintained by the Nebraska Library Commission, including how to subscribe, on our Nebraska Library Commission Mailing Lists page.

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The Data Dude on WiFi

wifiThis week, in between answering public library survey related questions and reviewing actual surveys that have been submitted (the deadline is February 13, 2015), the Dude has been thinking about this new element on the survey asking for the number of annual wireless internet sessions. Some of the responses the Dude has been getting about collecting this data have been a thumbs down analogous to Joaquin Phoenix’s portrayal of Commodus in the movie Gladiator or the verbal equivalent: “I ain’t collectin’ this”. In all fairness, most are at least willing to provide a broad observation estimate of the use, which is probably a fairly decent number. Thank you for doing that. This makes me think about the question you might be asking, which is why is collecting this data valuable? Let’s start this odyssey by looking the importance of public WiFi.

Quite simply, public WiFi is valuable because if you don’t have a data enabled device, you can’t get online if you aren’t somewhere that has WiFi availability. And we all want to be online, or at least have the option. If you do have a data enabled device (such as a tablet or smart phone), most likely you don’t want to use up your data or pay extra unless it is absolutely necessary (like if you get lost and need to look up a map or directions; if you need to find an address or phone number in a pinch; if you want to order a pizza online while you are out at the lake and pick it up on the way home; or if you are at Home Depot and want to know if the price they are asking for that garden weasel is comparable to Lowe’s). Those kinds of things. Iconic Displays recently produced an infographic entitled “Is Wifi the New Cigarette?” detailing the importance of WiFi to the average person:

  • 30% of people claim they can’t go without WiFi access for more than an hour
  • 60% of people can’t go without WiFi access for more than a day
  • 39% say they would give up coffee for WiFi access
  • 43% say they would go without chocolate for WiFi
  • 75% said that a week without WiFi would leave them grumpier than a week without coffee

So we like our WiFi (for some, more than our coffee and chocolate), and we’ve come to expect it in many places in addition to our homes. These include hotel rooms, restaurants (including coffee shops), airports (and even some airplanes), public parks, public libraries, and many others. As usual, the Dude feels a need to toss in some data about how our WiFi compares to the rest of the world. Predictably, it ain’t good. According to Rotten WiFi, the U.S. ranks a measly 20th in the world with an average public WiFi download speed of 6.89. The U.S. was behind number 1 Lithuania (15.4 Mbps), Croatia (14.05), Estonia (13.75), and 16 others. The Dude could find no credible data on average WiFi speeds for libraries (either in Nebraska or the U.S.). Perhaps that would be the subject of a new data element on the survey…

Focus. Back on track with the value of collecting this data. As illustrated above, it’s important to have places in the community that have free WiFi that we can use. If we are traveling and just passing through or stay somewhere that doesn’t have WiFi, it’s nice to have the option to go to our public library and use our own WiFi enabled devices because if we have our own device, we don’t need to wait for a public access terminal. We can also sit on the library’s sofa, or near the library’s fireplace (if they have one), or outside (if the weather is nice) instead of on those public access chairs. Also, many rural communities do not have many areas where free public WiFi is available (other than the library), and many do not have access in their homes. So, the gathering of this data is, like other data gathering, important in that it demonstrates that libraries are providing a service to their community that is valuable.

One final note and that is that some libraries are also getting into the business of loaning WiFi devices to library card holders so they can use them in their own homes. An example is the New York Public Library, which recently scored $1 million from Google and $500,000 from the Knight Foundation. The devices (4G LTE mobile hot spots) are in high demand, and may be checked out for a longer duration (like, months). This is another example of libraries reaching out to meet the technology needs of the community. In NY, over 2 million people don’t have access to broadband or WiFi at home, so these kinds of services not only introduce those library users to WiFi, but provide valuable connectivity for those who simply can’t afford it. Shaka.

 

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A Cup of Tea

Kitchen diningWe are having balmy January days here in Nebraska, but people in colder parts of the country may be glad to know that January is National Hot Tea Month. While there are only a few days left in the month, a hot cup of tea is always a good way to ward off the winter chill. A look through Nebraska Memories reveals that tea has been a part of people’s lives for many years.

Tea cups are featured on this Fremont family’s table as they gather in their kitchen for a meal. Photographs from the William Wallace residence in Omaha show a tea kettle in the kitchen and silver tea sets Dining room, William Wallace residencein the dining room and parlor.

Although there may not have been actual tea involved, in my opinion, some of the sweetest tea-related pictures in Nebraska Memories are the images of children having tea parties. There are several posed portraits of children with tea sets in the Butler County Gallery collection, including this photograph of Dorothy Rich sitting with a doll and a stuffed bunny. The Dorothy RichNebraska State Historical Society collection includes a less formal image of children playing with a tea set in a barn.

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, or contact Beth Goble, Historical Services Librarian, or Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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Jack McDevitt to Receive The 2015 Robert A. Heinlein Award

Jack McDevittSF author, and recent entry in the Commission’s Friday Reads, Jack McDevitt is being honored this year.

Jack McDevitt, science fiction author is the 2015 winner of the Robert A. Heinlein Award. The award is bestowed for outstanding published works in science fiction and technical writings that inspire the human exploration of space. This award is in recognition of Mr. McDevitt’s body of work including over 21 novels and 81 short stories.

The award will be presented on Friday, May 22, 2015 at opening ceremonies during Balticon 49, the Maryland Regional Science Fiction Convention. Balticon and the Robert A. Heinlein Award are both managed and sponsored by The Baltimore Science Fiction Society. A grant from the Heinlein Society funds a quarter of the costs associated with the award.

Read the full article @ SF Signal.

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NCompass Live: Tech Talk with Michael Sauers: CES & Libraries 2015

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Tech Talk with Michael Sauers: CES & Libraries 2015″, on Wednesday, January 28, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) is one of the largest technology trade shows of its kind, featuring new product releases, updates, and a chance to experience the latest and greatest technologies from companies big and small. Join Brian Pichman of the Evolve Project who attends the show to spread the word about libraries to the exhibitors at CES, securing partnerships on behalf of libraries so that libraries may have more opportunities to innovate and bring new technology in for their patrons. Brian will share his experiences at the Consumer Electronic Show, sharing the top trends at CES, cool tech to watch for, and how this plays a role in libraries.

In this monthly feature of NCompass Live, the NLC’s Technology Innovation Librarian, Michael Sauers, will discuss the tech news of the month and share new and exciting tech for your library. There will also be plenty of time in each episode for you to ask your tech questions. So, bring your questions with you, or send them in ahead of time, and Michael will have your answers.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • February 11 – Fun with Friends: Integrating Programming for Adults with Special Needs Into Your Library
  • February 18 – Anatomy of an Ad Campaign

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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HWA Announces Jack Ketchum and Tanith Lee as 2015 Lifetime Achievement Award Winners

Horror-writers-association02

The Horror Writers Association (HWA), the premier organization of writers and publishers of horror and dark fantasy and home of the iconic Bram Stoker Awards®, today announced Jack Ketchum and Tanith Lee as the 2015 recipients of the Bram Stoker Award® for Lifetime Achievement. The HWA presents the award annually to individuals whose work has substantially influenced the horror genre. While the award is often presented to a writer, it may also be given for influential accomplishments in other creative fields.

“We had a wealth of very worthy candidates for this award,” said John R. Little, jury chairperson of the Lifetime Achievement Award (LAA) committee. “After much discussion, we believe we agreed on two exceptional winners this year.”

Jack Ketchum has been one of the premiere authors in the horror field for many years. His novel The Girl Next Door is considered a classic, but he’s written many other equally deeply moving works. Ketchum has won the Bram Stoker Award® four times and been nominated an additional three times, showing the broad appeal to his audience. He was named the Grandmaster at the 2011 World Horror Convention.

Tanith Lee has written more than ninety novels in various fields, including horror, fantasy, and science fiction. She is very popular regardless of the genre she chooses to write in. She has won several World Fantasy and British Fantasy Awards, and in 2013 was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award at the World Fantasy Convention.

“Jack and Tanith remain extremely popular authors today,” said HWA President Lisa Morton, “and the Horror Writers Association is proud to bestow the Lifetime Achievement Award on them.”

Ketchum will be on-hand to accept the award (Lee will accept via video), on the evening of Saturday, May 9, 2015 as part of a gala banquet and the presentation of the Bram Stoker Awards during the World Horror Convention in Atlanta, Georgia. Tickets to the banquet and the convention are on sale to the public at http://www.whc2015.org. The awards presentation will also be live-streamed online for those who cannot attend in person.

The 2015 Lifetime Achievement Committee was chaired by John R Little, and included Maria Alexander, Patrick Freivald, Aaron Sterns and Heather Graham. For more information on the Bram Stoker Awards presentation and the 2015 World Horror Convention, please visit http://www.whc2015.org.

THE HORROR WRITERS ASSOCIATION is a nonprofit organization of writers and publishing professionals around the world, dedicated to promoting dark literature and the interests of those who write it. The HWA formed in 1985 with the help of many of the field’s greats, including Dean Koontz, Robert McCammon, and Joe Lansdale. Today, with over 1250 members around the globe, it is the oldest and most respected professional organization for the much-loved writers who have brought you the most enjoyable sleepless nights of your life.

One of HWA’s missions is to encourage public interest in and foster an appreciation of good Horror and Dark Fantasy literature. The organization offers public areas of its site, www.horror.org; sponsors or takes part in public readings and lectures; publishes a monthly newsletter for members; maintains outreach to booksellers, librarians, fans and readers; facilitates readings and signings by horror writers; offers scholarships; and maintains an official presence at the major fan-based horror and fantasy conventions, such as the World Horror Convention, and literary festivals.

For more information on the HWA, please visit www.Horror.org

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Will Eisner Graphic Novel Grants for Libraries

Will Eisner

Two Will Eisner Graphic Novel Grants for Libraries are given annually – the Will Eisner Graphic Novel Growth Grant will provide support to a library that would like to expand its existing graphic novel services and programs and the Will Eisner Graphic Novel Innovation Grant will provides support to a library for the initiation of a graphic novel service, program or initiative. These Grants will support two categorical grants that will encourage public awareness on the rise and importance of graphic literature, sequential art, and comics as a literary medium.  The objective of the Will Eisner Graphic Novel Grants for Libraries is to facilitate library-generated programs and services that will promote graphic novels to library patrons and to the local community.

Will Eisner (1917-2005) was an acclaimed American comics writer, artist, teacher, and entrepreneur.  He is considered one of the most important contributors to the development of sequential art (a term he coined) and is known for the cartooning studio he founded; for his highly influential comic series, The Spirit; for his use of comics as an instructional medium; for his leading role in establishing the graphic novel as a form of literature with his 1978 groundbreaking graphic novel, A Contract with God and Other Tenement Stories; for his 20 years of teaching at the School of Visual Arts, leading to his three textbooks. In a career that spanned nearly seven decades—from the dawn of the comic book to the advent of digital comics—Will Eisner was truly the “Father of the Graphic Novel.”

Each winning library will receive a grant award of $4,000 to support initiatives that align with the objective of the Will Eisner Graphic Novel Grants for Libraries.  The grant award will consist of the following:

  • $2,000 grant to purchase graphic novels from the distributor-partner (current partner is The Brodart company.  Purchase to include cataloging and shipping),
  • $1,000 grant to host a graphic novel-themed event at a library or another community location, and
  • $1,000 grant to attend the ALA Annual Conference to receive their grant money.  This grant can be used towards any of the following: conference registration, transportation, lodging and food.

In addition, from the book publishers and the Eisner Foundation, the winning libraries will also receive the following graphic novels, valued at approximately $3,000:

  • The Will Eisner Library: A graphic novel collection of Will Eisner’s work and biographies about Will Eisner comprising approximately 75 books and;
  • Graphic novels nominated for the current year’s Will Eisner Awards at Comic-Con International comprising approximately 100 books.

Chosen Grant applicant must agree to take responsibility for organizing a recognition ceremony of their grant in their library.

Further details and application information @ ALA.org.

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Friday Reads: The Homesman–A novel about Nebraska

HomesmanThe Homesman is a devastating story of early pioneers in 1850s Nebraska. It celebrates the ones we hear nothing of: the brave women whose hearts and minds were broken by a life of bitter hardship. A “homesman” must be found to escort a handful of them back East to a sanitarium. When none of the county’s men steps up, the job falls to Mary Bee Cuddy—ex-teacher, spinster, indomitable and resourceful. Brave as she is, Mary Bee knows she cannot succeed alone. The only companion she can find is the low-life claim jumper George Briggs. Thus begins a trek east, against the tide of colonization, against hardship, Indian attacks, ice storms, and loneliness—a timeless classic told in a series of tough, fast-paced adventures.

Glendon Swarthout’s novel from 1988 won both the Western Writers of America’s Spur Award and the Western Heritage Wrangler Award. A new afterword by the author’s son Miles Swarthout tells of his parents Glendon and Kathryn’s discovery of and research into the lives of the oft-forgotten frontier women who make The Homesman as moving and believable as it is unforgettable.

Having seen a trailer for the recent movie of the same title, starring Hillary Swank and Tommy Lee Jones, I picked up a copy of the book at the airport while my husband and I were traveling this past Christmas.  The minute I started reading it, I was completely pulled in ; it was riveting and shocking, all at the same time.  I highly recommend this book (and movie) about frontier Nebraska.

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Throwback Thursday: Children from School District 62 selecting books from the bookmobile, circa 1930’s

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Nebraska Public Library Commission bookmobile delivering books to school district 62 children, circa 1930’s

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New Government Publications Received at the Library Commission

NEState SealState government publications ranging from Agriculture to University of Nebraska Press, received November and December, 2014.

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The Data Dude – eBooks and Audiobooks

ebook chart 2014For this week, the Dude takes another quick look at eBooks and Audiobooks. He’s been working on some handouts and fact sheets for the Nebraska eReads program, and here is one of the resultant charts. As many of you know, eBook and Audiobook circulations are notably increasing, as evidenced by the chart to the right. Circulation has increased about 39% from last year. Keep in mind, however, that there are more participating OverDrive libraries as well (more borrowers in the ocean of electronic content that adds to the rise in circulation). A few other facts about eBooks and Audiobooks in Nebraska:

  • There are now over 8 million eBooks available (over 88% increase from 2012)
  • There are now over 794,000 AudioBooks available (over 96% increase from 2012)
  • The return on investment for every dollar invested is $2.72
  • Virtual visitors had to wait 204,502 times for desired titles in 2014
  • There are now 167 Participating Libraries offering eBooks and Audiobooks via the OverDrive consortium

If the budget request for FY 2016 and FY 2017 is approved, the following additional items could be purchased/licensed:

For FY 2016:

  • 8,300 eBooks could be purchased/licensed
  • 2,800 Audiobooks could be purchased/licensed

For FY 2017:

  • 9,000 eBooks could be purchased/licensed
  • 3,100 Audiobooks could be purchased/licensed

Shaka.

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A Balloon School in Nebraska?

FortOmahaWhile I was in Rochester, New York this past Christmas visiting my husband’s family, my father-in-law showed me some letters from a World War I 2nd Lieutenant from Spencerport, NY, who had a Nebraska connection. Based on the letters and some further research, I found out that this young man was stationed at Fort Omaha, Nebraska for Balloon School.

Fort Omaha (the Nebraska Memories picture to the left), located at 5730 North 30th Street, in Omaha, Nebraska, was opened in 1868 as an Indian War-era United States Army supply depot for various forts along the Platte River.   This is also where Ponca Chief Standing Bear and 29 fellow Ponca were held prior to the landmark 1879 trial of Standing Bear v. Crook. Judge Elmer Dundy determined that American Indians were persons within the meaning of the law and that the Ponca were illegally detained after leaving Indian Territory in January 1879.  FortOmaha2The Nebraska Memories picture of the fort to the right, was taken about that same time period.

Fort Omaha today is primarily occupied by Metropolitan Community College, but continues to house Navy, Marine and Army Reserve units. The fort is located in the present-day Miller Park neighborhood of North Omaha. The Fort Omaha Historic District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  The district includes the 1879 General Crook House Museum, as well as the 1879 Quartermaster’s office, 1878 commissary, 1884 guardhouse, 1883 ordnance magazine and 1887 mule stables.

In 1907 the Army built a large steel hangar at Fort Omaha for use in experiments with dirigibles, a program that was abandoned in 1909. This program and its successor, the military use of hot air balloons for reconnaissance missions, were part of the American Expeditionary Forces.  A balloon house was built in 1908, and in 1909 the first balloon flight took place.   Here is a picture from Nebraska Memories of the Balloon House at Fort Omaha, taken sometime between 1908 and 1910:

balloonschool4Shortly after the United States entered World War I, 800 men enlisted in the Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corp, one of whom was William Spencer Barker, from Spencerport, NY.  They were immediately sent to the Balloon School at Fort Omaha for training. More than 16,000 airmen went through the Balloon Schools at Fort Omaha and other locations around the U.S., between 1908 and the close of the program in 1919.

Balloonists were trained in map reading and charting troop movements. This information was communicated through an extensive switchboard system to artillery troops on the ground.  The balloons were “captive” stationary balloons, utilized tail fins for stabilization, and had cables to tether the balloon to the ground.

In 1917, 2nd Lieutenant Baker was part of the 5th Squadron, Balloon Division, and did see military action with balloon squadrons in France from 1918-1919.

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images of digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, or contact Beth Goble, Historical Services Librarian, or Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

 

 

 

Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training, General, Information Resources, Library Management, Nebraska Memories, Preservation, Programming, What's Up Doc / Govdocs | Leave a comment

Tax forms flyer available for your customization and use

Daniel Glauber a librarian in White Plains, NY has made this wonderful flyer regarding the lack of tax forms and instructions this year available for others to customize and use. You can download the Publisher file and all you really need to do is change the printing cost information and address of your nearest Taxpayer Assistance Center or other relevant service provider. (And maybe the date for the arrival of the state forms.)

Tax Forms flyer

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Friday Reads: Coming Home, by Jack McDevitt

Coming HomeComing Home is the seventh Alex Benedict novel by Jack McDevitt. These are not military or thriller science fiction, but they do have a quest, and a quirky pace much like real life. They are narrated by his assistant and pilot, Chase Kolpath. Alex is in the business of antiquities (or salvage, depending on your opinion), thousands of years in the future of a timeline that could be ours. Human empires and cultures have risen and fallen since humans left Earth; so much history is lost due to riots and wars. And much of the history of the early years of space exploration is missing, such as the early flights to the moon. A friend of theirs brings them an early space artifact of mysterious origins and asks for their help in authenticating it. The trail leads finally, to Earth, and more mystery.
Also creating tension for the pair is the fact that Alex’s uncle is on a space liner caught in a space/time warp, which makes the ship available every 5 years, real time, only minutes have elapsed shipside. So that only a few people can be rescued each time, before the ship disappears again, for 5 years. Since Alex owns a yacht, and Chase is the pilot, she is involved in the rescue attempts.
Jack McDevitt definitely has a distinctive voice in the field, and can both create characters that one can care about, as well as interesting science. His pacing is also more like real life, the antique search slowing and speeding up much like a real search with hunches played out and failed, and others popping up. The work on the space liner rescue interrupts regular life, as it would, and then the excitement dies down. It feels much more like living with the characters than the constant roller coaster thrill ride of a science fiction thriller. Much more consideration about the human element and consequences is often given in his work.

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NCompass Live: Guys Read: Men of the NLC Talk Books

NCompass live smallJoin us for next week’s NCompass Live, “Guys Read: Men of the NLC Talk Books”, on Wednesday, January 21, 10:00-11:00 am Central Time.

The staff at the Nebraska Library Commission are readers. And we enjoy talking about what we’ve read. Join Michael Sauers and Sam Shaw, from the Library Commission, as they share some of their favorite books. You’ll be sure to find a few good additions for your library’s collection.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • January 28 – Tech Talk with Michael Sauers: CES & Libraries 2015
  • February 11 – Fun with Friends: Integrating Programming for Adults with Special Needs Into Your Library
  • February 18 – Anatomy of an Ad Campaign

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What’s Sally Reading?

ALA Youth Media Awards will be Announced on February 2, 2015

The awards ceremony will be broadcast at 8:00 a.m. CT on Monday, Feb. 2, 2015, during the ALA Midwinter Meeting & Exhibition in Chicago.  You can join them live via your computer if you have the time.  Go here to find the link to join their live webcast.  If you prefer, you can follow I Love Libraries on Twitter and Facebook instead.  I will be clicking on the “webcast” link hoping I can be added to the many people joining via the Internet.  If you click the link now, you will see a countdown clock for the event.

I will send out the list of winners and honor books as soon as I receive the press release, so if you are unable to attend you will still learn about the awards not long after the video announcements.

JenkinsCreature Features: Twenty-Five Animals Explain Why They Look the Way They Do by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page.  Their newest title looks at 25 animals with unusual features and explains why they have them.  For example, the leaf-nosed bat uses its unusual nose to direct sounds to its ears.  Art dominates each page with a brief question and answer, readers will be intrigued.  The art always shows the animals head and face from the front, and not much of the rest of their bodies.  Readers may be curious enough to go looking for complete photos or illustrations of the named creatures.  This title is great for preschool through second grade.

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

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What To Do About Tax Forms

The Swiss Army Librarian is discussing how his library is handlingtaxcalculator the shortage of tax forms this year.  Seems the IRS Tax Forms Outlet Program doesn’t have the budget to send all the forms it has been sending to libraries.  So what’s a library to do?  SAL has some ideas and he’d like to hear what others are doing.   If anyone is adept at dealing with shortages, it’s librarians, so this exchange of ideas should be worthwhile.

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