Category Archives: Technology

July 4th Fun Facts–Celebrating 243 Years of Independence!

As the nation celebrates this Independence Day, it’s a good time to reflect on how our Founding Fathers enshrined in our Constitution the importance of statistics as a vital tool for measuring people, places and economy.

Who was the first signer of the Declaration of Independence?

Is there a U.S. county named Independence?

What was the nation’s population in 1776?

Answers:

  • John Hancock, a merchant by trade, was the first to sign the Declaration of Independence.
  • The only county named Independence is in Arkansas.
  • The U.S. population was 2.5 million in 1776. It is more than 130 times larger today at 330 million

The following statistics — historical and whimsical — come from responses to U.S. Census Bureau surveys:

 

 

More Fun Facts  

The Census Bureau’s Statistics in Schools program has created this Fun Facts & Teaching Guide for the Fourth of July.

Teachers can interact with students by using fun but real-life data related to the holiday. The teaching guide offers ideas on how to use these facts as an activity.

 

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NCompass Live: Pretty Sweet Tech – Enhance Your Online Security with Password Management Tools

Learn how to ‘Enhance Your Online Security with Password Management Tools’ on the next FREE NCompass Live webinar, on Wednesday, July 3, 10:00am-11:00am CT.

New special monthly episodes of NCompass Live! Join the NLC’s Technology Innovation Librarian, Amanda Sweet, as she guides us through the world of library-related Pretty Sweet Tech.

Password Management Tools can help you keep your passwords straight, develop strong passwords, and make it infinitely more difficult for hackers to get ahold of your sensitive information. This session will cover the following topics:

  • What are the main threats to my online security?
  • How can I prevent this from happening?
  • Examples of good online password security
  • A demonstration/ overview of LastPass Password Manager

You’ll also have access to a handout with lots of handy information to keep patrons informed about their online security options.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • July 10 – Fun, Easy, and Inexpensive Teen Nights (aka After Hours)
  • July 17 – ACRL Outcome Measurement Made Easy: Project Outcome for Academic Libraries
  • July 24 – The Golden Sower Award: Nebraska’s Children’s Choice Literary Award
  • July 31 – How Does Your Library Garden Grow?
  • Aug. 7 – Life in Fort Schuyler: The Challenges Faced at the SUNY Maritime College Library
  • Aug. 14 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Aug. 21 – Research – the Key to Library Design
  • Aug. 28 – Eliminating Late Fines is a Win-Win for Your Library and Community

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Pretty Sweet Tech: Podcasting Basics

Have you ever considered a library-hosted podcast? With the right equipment, you could help patrons record and edit local podcasts and link them to your library’s website! Topics could range anywhere from book and movie reviews to local/ state history, and anything in between! Read on to learn how you can make this happen in your library:

What is a Podcast?

Podcasts are audio recordings that are geared towards providing new information, entertainment, or asking listeners to look at topics from a different point of view. Podcasts can have a single host/narrator, have a more conversational format between multiple hosts, or be an interview between host and guest. There’s no one right way to podcast!

How Can We Plan a Podcast?

There are a ton of resources out there for how to plan and record your own podcast. I’ll put a few pointers that have worked for some other libraries here, then add some additional resources at the end of the list:

  1. Target Audience: Try to anticipate who your target audience is. You don’t want to use teen slang for a podcast about retirement getaways!
  2. Length: Start asking potential listeners how long they like their podcasts. If your listeners only have time for 15 minutes, don’t record an hour long podcast!
  3. Topic: Start listening around. Find out which podcasts exist about your preferred topic. Listen for what works and what doesn’t work for you.
  4. How to Record: Some hosts record all in one, long segment. Others record in short bursts and stitch the sections together. Short bursts leave room for error.
  5. Ad Lib or Script? Some hosts plan their show down to the last word. Others wing it. It’s really up to your comfort level. Kids and teens might need structure.
  6. Where to Host? Think about what you need to be able to do with your recordings when you’re done. Some hosting options like Lisbyn have editing features and will help you sync the podcast to your website. But it can cost a bit. Podbean is an option if you want to start with free and grow. Free doesn’t have as much functionality, but everybody starts somewhere!

Here are some start to finish guides for planning a podcast:

As you can see, pretty much everything you need is on The Podcast Host. They know all, and I’ve used a lot of their stuff when learning how to use our makerspace audio kit stuff. Happy podcasting everyone!

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Census Bureau Announces 2019 Census Test to Begin

The U.S. Census Bureau has announced that the 2019 Census Test has begun, as approximately 480,000 housing units across the country receive a questionnaire testing the operational effects of including a citizenship question on the 2020 Census. The 2019 Census Test will randomly assign households to two panels and ask them to respond to the 2020 Census questions. Panel A will include the question on citizenship, Panel B will not.   Findings from the nationwide test will assist in determining updates to 2020 Census operations, such as how many census takers are needed to follow up with nonresponding households and how to better communicate with households about the 2020 Census.

 

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CSLP’s 2019 Teen Video Challenge!

Looking for an easy program to share with your teens? The 2019 Teen Video Challenge (TVC) sponsored by the Collaborative Summer Library Program (CSLP) has been streamlined to help make participating in this contest easier than ever!

[https://www.cslpreads.org/programs/teen-program/2019-teen-video-challenge/] This site contains links to the Official TVC Submission Form, the Complete Contest Rules, and winning videos from years past. Changes with this new approach to the TVC:

  • Instead of state winners, there will be 5 national winners. Just have your teens submit a link to their video.
  • The program will accept submissions June 1-Aug 2, 2019, so that you can incorporate it into your summer programs (its still a great opportunity to partner with schools with video production classes or clubs; students can produce the videos as a class project and submit them in June!)
  • Videos will be limited to 60 seconds, making this a much more doable project for small teams.
  • Permission and model release forms will only be required from the winning entries (completing the forms is a requirement to receive prizes and acknowledgement).
  • The TVC Ad-Hoc Committee will convene a judging panel from CSLP partners and members.
  • Video uploads will not be limited to YouTube and Vimeo; rather, teens can upload to the social media outlet of their choice.

I hope your teens will give it a try!

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Pretty Sweet Tech: Makerspace Highlights

I’ve been running around creating makerspace goodness this week, so this is going to be a short post. It’s all about makerspaces and some of the cool things you can get for your makerspace. This is great whether you’re just starting out, or want to spice up your existing offerings:

Merge Cube: This looks like a little foam cube, but it is oh, so much more. Paired with a smartphone, you can overlay amazing 3D images onto this magical little cube. Take a look at the video on Merge Cube’s home page to see it in action. There are ways to use pre-made projects, or to create your own using an app!

Dash and Dot Robots: These robots are great for kids of all ages. Dash is geared towards kids 6 and up, while Dot is geared for kids 11 and up. But adults can use them too! I’m a big kid now. These robots have plenty of great pre-made curriculum and project ideas too!

LEGO Mindstorms: This is a robot that will let you build the actual bot, then program it as well! I train this one for the Innovation Studios grant, so I can answer a bunch of questions about this one. It’s geared towards 8 and up, but it has a lot of flexibility to be hacked by adults too. Good times.

Paper Circuits: If you’re looking for low-cost ways to show the basics of circuitry and electronics, this book is a great place to start. Makerspaces.com also has quite a few other project ideas.

Arduino for Beginners: Makerspaces.com also has this great book showing you everything you need to know about Arduino for beginners. You’ll learn how the board works, some simple circuits, and to interact with the right software.

There are plenty of other makerspace options out there. But this is a start. I chose mostly all low-cost options. The bigger machines like 3D printers, laser cutters, vinyl cutters, and all that fun stuff are also out there. Feel free to email me at amanda.sweet@nebraska.gov if you have any questions, or would like some recommendations.

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Brush Up On NebraskAccess Statewide Databases With NEW Training Videos

Do you feel like your NebraskAccess database-searching skills are getting rusty? Or maybe you’re new to the Nebraska library world and haven’t had a chance to dip into the databases yet? If either scenario sounds familiar, you might want to check out our NEW short training videos. Ten videos are available so far. The shortest video is just under three minutes and the longest is just over fifteen.

Links to these new training videos appear on the Librarian’s Toolbox: Help page:

Links to individual videos also appear on database-specific “About” pages. On the Databases Available to Nebraskans page, click on the question mark icon to the right of a database logo/annotation to access the “About” page for that database:

If we’ve created a training video for that database, it will appear in the “Help Resources from the Nebraska Library Commission Staff” section of that database’s “About” page:

We hope the information and search examples included in these videos will give you an extra boost of confidence when searching and promoting the NebraskAccess databases. Let us know what you think!

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Pretty Sweet Tech: DigitalLearn for Digital Skills!

If you have library patrons who are just starting to use computers, or want to learn more about how to use them well, DigitalLearn, made by the Public Library Association (PLA) is a good way to go. They cover everything from why we need computers, to online privacy basics, and tips for buying plane tickets online.

Who Should Use This Resource?

If you’re wondering who this resource is geared towards, the blurb on top of DigitalLearn’s site says it all: “If you are new to computers, haven’t used them for a while, are a little unsure and uncomfortable, or just need a bit of a refresher, we have the tools to help you tackle technology at your own pace and gain the confidence you need to succeed.”

The site is written in clear, easily understood language. Each tab has a set of short videos, each video has a PDF version, just in case users learn better by reading instead of watching videos. Everybody learns differently. Some of the videos also have additional worksheet exercises users can fill out if they want more guidance on the path towards computing.

How Can Librarians Use This to Help Patrons in Person?

DigitalLearn has several pre-made courses, complete with handouts and materials, for you to teach classes in person at your library. Each section has an Instructor’s Guide, Activity Sheet, and a Handout. Some of the classes have PowerPoint presentations, practice files and a few other things. All in all, these materials will make it a whole lot easier for you to start offering more digital literacy in your library. Without having to take time to create materials from scratch. It’s a win-win!

Nebraska Library Commission’s Upcoming Digital Literacy Class

We’re gearing up for more digital literacy here at the Library Commission as well. The course is still being researched and put together, but if you have any recommendations, feel free to comment on this post, or email amanda.sweet@nebraska.gov.

 

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NCompass Live: Pretty Sweet Tech – Use Website Building to Launch into Virtual & Augmented Reality!

Learn how to ‘Use Website Building to Launch into Virtual & Augmented Reality!’ on the next FREE NCompass Live webinar, on Wednesday, June 12, 10:00am-11:00am CT.

New special monthly episodes of NCompass Live! Join the NLC’s Technology Innovation Librarian, Amanda Sweet, as she guides us through the world of library-related Pretty Sweet Tech.

Did you know that building a website can be a great launching pad into virtual and augmented reality? Many libraries are doing Hour of Code and website building activities as an introduction to the wonderful world of coding. But what comes next? What are our goals for learning technology in the future? This webinar will provide you with the following:

  • A brief overview of what augmented and virtual reality are, and how they are used
  • Some possible roadmaps to start with website development skills (HTML, CSS, Javascript, design, etc.)
  • Ways to build off of these web skills to launch into VR and AR
  • Some examples of what can come next

This webinar is geared towards the curious and beginner/intermediate coders. It’s time to build a strong foundation for future tech skills. Discover what’s out there.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • June 19 – Growing Partnerships Where Least Expected
  • July 3 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • July 24 – The Golden Sower Award: Nebraska’s Children’s Choice Literary Award
  • July 31 – How Does Your Library Garden Grow?
  • Aug. 7 – Life in Fort Schuyler: The Challenges Faced at the SUNY Maritime College Library
  • Aug. 14 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Aug. 21 – Research – the Key to Library Design
  • Aug. 28 – Eliminating Late Fines is a Win-Win for Your Library and Community

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Internet Librarian Conference (Oct 21-23) Discount

The Nebraska Library Commission is offering a group discount to all librarians in Nebraska who attend the 2019 Internet Librarian Conference. This year it will be held at the Monterey Marriott in Monterey, California on October 21-23, 2019. Detailed information about the conference can be found on the conference web page.

As in the past, InfoToday is offering select groups the opportunity to participate in their Group Discount Program. The Gold Pass is available to groups at the discounted rate of $649 (regularly $819 and the only pass to include preconference workshops). They are also offering a special rate of $399 for the 3-Day Pass (regular rate is $549). (No discount rates are available for the separately priced preconference workshops.)

In addition, the discount rate of $119 (regularly $209) on the Internet@Schools Track is also available.

To receive the discount

  1. Go to the Internet Librarian 2019 Registration page.
  2. Click on the Register Now graphic at the top of the page.
  3. Type priority code 19NLC in the Priority Code field at the top of the form, and click the “Activate Code” button. Discounted rates should appear on the registration form after you successfully activate the code. If you don’t see the discounted rates on the form, please contact Susan Knisely for assistance.
  4. Complete and submit the online registration form by the September 20th deadline to receive the discounted rates. Rates will go up by $20 after the deadline.
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Pretty Sweet Tech: Who Regulates the Internet?

If somebody walked up to your library’s reference desk and asked “who regulates the internet? What if I see something bad?” What would you say?

Honestly, this is a tough question because the answer varies so much. By and large, there isn’t much regulation from any one governing body in the United States. Let’s dig a little deeper into this idea by breaking it down into smaller categories:

Online Advertising

Ads online are regulated on several levels:

Federal: The Federal Trade Commission has a set of resources available to learn about guidelines, rules, and recommendations for buyers and sellers online.

State: According to Truth in Advertising.org, Nebraska has a Consumer Protection Division through the Office of the Attorney General that files complaints against false advertisements.  The also includes a link to Nebraska’s advertising laws.

Self-Regulated: Many website and organizations are also setting their own policies for advertisements on their pages. A thorough example is Google’s Ads Policies.

Online Content

Removing harmful content like fake news, hate speech, instructions for how to perform criminal acts, and other poor online behavior is largely self-regulated from site to site. The internet is a big place and it’s hard for a large regulatory authority to grapple with that much content. Right now it’s most’y up to websites and all of us to self-regulate and report harmful content directly to sites like YouTube, Facebook, or Google.

Access to Internet

Federal: The Federal Trade Commission has a set of policies in place for access to the internet and how people can be charged for services. These policies only pertain to communications online, like email, VoIP services, and some connectivity issues.

The debate over Net Neutrality has been raging for quite some time.  Rather than hash out the whole debate in this post, check out the current state of affairs by looking at the National Conference of State Legislatures’ Net Neutrality 2019 Legislation. There’s a chart on this page that will let you know what Nebraska is doing in comparison to other states. You can also check out this video: BBC What is Net Neutrality?

Summary

The internet is basically a whole other world. Under which regulatory authority would you place internet services? The internet does communication, data collection, advertising, online commerce, and pretty much everything under the sun. Who regulates what?

For now, libraries can start connecting people with existing resources, and start to get people thinking about what they would like to see out of the internet. What helps, and what hurts in the world wide web?

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The Public Library’s Role during Elections: Voter Education in the Age of Misinformation

In a time marked by uncertainty, the public library is in an extraordinary position as one of society’s most trusted institutions. Public libraries can leverage that trust to be at the forefront of voter education as we head into what will be one of the most watched presidential elections of our lifetimes.

This presentation will equip librarians to gather user-friendly information from reliable and nonpartisan sources, allowing libraries to offer an invaluable, evolving resource tailor-made for their communities. By exploring resources—everything from a glossary of common terms used during elections to campaign finance information—this webinar will help librarians gather the most useful information in addressing their community’s needs. With a focus on citizenship and voting, librarians will learn to serve their diverse populations in a nonthreatening and nonpartisan way. REGISTER NOW

Date: Tuesday, Jun. 4, 2019
Time: 1:00–2:00 p.m. Central Time

Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to:
• Identify the information needs of their communities regarding elections and voter mobilization efforts;
• Identify key stakeholders and audiences to whom they will communicate the importance of their voter education efforts; and
• Curate and design a helpful online resource equipping their communities to be engaged in the voting process.

Presenters:

Haley Samuelson is reference librarian at the Cook Memorial Public Library District serving Lake County, IL. With more than 15 years’ experience in libraries, Haley has worked with patrons of all ages. She also has experience working in at-risk neighborhoods on Chicago’s West Side. Since 2016, she has enjoyed marrying her background in politics with the information needs of her community.

Nate Gass is webmaster and emerging technology librarian at the Cook Memorial Public Library District serving Lake County, IL. In addition to maintaining the library’s website, he has eight years’ experience teaching computer classes and technology topics. Nate also hosts and produces the Cook Memorial Public Library Podcast (https://cooklib.org/podcast) and is a member of the library’s social media team.

Registration Details

Date: Tuesday, Jun. 4, 2019
Time: 1:00–2:00 p.m. Central Time
Cost: The webinar is free, but registration is required. You can register for this webinar until it begins, or until space is no longer available, whichever comes first.

REGISTER NOW

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Libraries’ Guide to the 2020 Census

The American Library Association has released the Libraries’ Guide to the 2020 Census, a new resource to prepare libraries for the decennial count of every person living in the United States.

The Guide contains practical information to assist library staff in addressing potential patron and community requests regarding the upcoming 2020 Census. The Guide includes:
• basic information about the Census process;
• highlights of new components in the 2020 Census, such as the online response option;
• frequently asked questions;
• a timeline of key Census dates;
• contact information and links to additional resources.

ALA teamed with the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality to develop the Guide, with support from ALA’s 2020 Census Library Outreach and Education Task Force. ALA plans to provide additional resources for library practitioners in the months leading up to Census Day on April 1, 2020.

The Libraries’ Guide to the 2020 Census is available for free download at ala.org/census.

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NASA MAKES THEIR ENTIRE MEDIA LIBRARY PUBLICLY ACCESSIBLE AND COPYRIGHT FREE

No matter if you enjoy taking or just watching images of space, NASA has a treat for you. They have made their entire collection of images, sounds, and video available and publicly searchable online. It’s 140,000 photos and other resources available for you to see, or even download and use it any way you like.

You can type in the term you want to search for and browse through the database of stunning images of outer space. Additionally, there are also images of astronauts, rocket launches, events at NASA and other interesting stuff. What’s also interesting is that almost every image comes with the EXIF data, which could be useful for astrophotography enthusiasts.

When you browse through the gallery, you can choose to see images, videos or audio. Another cool feature I noticed is that you can narrow down the results by the year. Of course, I used some of my time today to browse through the gallery, and here are some of the space photos you can find:

What I love about NASA is that they make interesting content for average Internet users. They make us feel closer and more familiar with their work and with the secrets of the outer space. For instance, they recently launched a GIPHY account full of awesome animated gifs. It’s also great that photography is an important part of their missions, and so it was even before “pics or it didn’t happen” became the rule. The vast media library they have now published is available to everyone, free of charge and free of copyright. Therefore, you can take a peek at the fascinating mysteries of space, check out what it’s like inside NASA’s premises, or download the images to make something awesome from them. Either way, you’ll enjoy it!

 

Courtesy of 

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THIS WEEK: Saving Your Family Treasures Workshop

Saving Your Family Treasures Workshop is a workshop that provides information on how to preserve damaged personal heirlooms after natural disasters. The workshop is free and open to the public.

Saturday, June 1, 2019: 10:30 am – 12:00 noon CST

The Durham Museum
801 South 10th Street
Omaha, NE 68108

When homes are flooded and lives upended, treasured possessions such as family heirlooms, photos, and other keepsakes become more cherished. Even in the aftermath of a disaster, these treasures may be salvageable. Smithsonian affiliate The Durham Museum has teamed up with the Smithsonian Cultural Rescue Initiative to host a second free workshop providing information on how to preserve damaged personal heirlooms after natural disasters.

Experts will demonstrate how to handle, dry, and clean damaged objects and share tips on personal safety, setting priorities, and other preservation options. There will be a formal presentation followed by a question and answer period.

The workshop will have examples of common personal heirlooms on display to demonstrate salvaging techniques. ***DUE TO SAFETY CONCERNS*** please do not bring your damaged objects to the workshop. If you have specific questions about your personal heirlooms, feel free to bring images of each item to discuss with the preservation experts directly.

 

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THIS WEEK: Training Seminar for Cultural Heritage Professionals

Cultural heritage professionals from across the region are invited for a training workshop for post‐disaster community engagement.

“Strategies for Post-Disaster Community Engagement Workshop”

When homes are damaged and lives are upended, treasured keepsakes such as artwork, photos, personal papers, and other family heirlooms become more cherished. Even in the aftermath of a disaster, these treasures may be salvageable.  Cultural institutions can provide important information to communities to preserve their possessions as they regain access to their homes and businesses. On May 31, the Smithsonian Institution’s experts will be onsite and online at The Durham Museum to provide a workshop exclusively for cultural heritage professionals. They will conduct a “train‐the-trainer”
session with the hope that institutions will host workshops in their own communities to most directly help those recovering from the recent historic flooding.

Friday, May 31 from 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. CST

The Durham Museum
Criss Conference Center,
801 S. 10th Street,
Omaha, NE

The workshop will be live-streamed through ZOOM video-conference software for those unable to attend onsite.

Presented by The Smithsonian Cultural Rescue Initiative, in collaboration with The Durham Museum in Omaha.

Register by emailing Carrie Meyer at cmeyer@durhammuseum.org and indicate ZOOM or onsite participation.

 

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Pretty Sweet Tech: Is Your Website Mobile Friendly?

Think about the last time you checked the hours of a business. Were you at home or running around town? Were you on a mobile device? Do you have a smartphone?

Statista.com shows that 48.71% of all web traffic comes from a mobile device. That number is estimated to climb higher in coming years. For this reason, many companies are adopting what they call “mobile first” strategies. This means they are optimizing their websites for smartphone screens and tablets. Sadly, this also means it may get harder for people without smartphones to access the information they need. Times are changing, and in some ways not for the better.

This also means libraries will have to adapt to stay relevant in a mobile-first world. Library customers are used to user experiences on Amazon, Google, and large department stores. If our library websites don’t have the same visual appeal, they probably won’t stay long. New customers will also be less likely to take action and come into the library.

So what can we do? If you’re familiar with web development, start by looking into responsive design and fluid layout as a way to make mobile-first happen. This will allow your content to automatically detect the size of the screen and display content properly. Just make sure your font sizes are legible and your objects are a good size for adult fingertips to activate. There are other ways to do this, including building a separate design for popular screen sizes, but that takes a lot more time and energy to maintain.

Mobile-first means we build for mobile, then make sure it works for desktop, rather than designing for desktop screens and hoping for mobile. If users have to scroll from side to side a lot, or zoom in and out to navigate and read text, they won’t stay on your site long. Next time you visit a website on your phone, think about why it works or doesn’t work for you, and why you click away. Stick with what works for your library.

But what if you’re not a developer, or don’t have that kind of time? Luckily, all you need are the right tools! WordPress is a great content management solution that makes it quick and easy to set up and maintain websites. Google “best responsive WordPress themes”. Choose one, make a quick test site, then hop on your mobile device and take it for a test drive. Can you read the text without zooming much? Can you click buttons without zooming, or missing the button? Is the navigation menu easy to use?

If that seems easier said than done, give me a call and we can walk through the steps of mobile-first design for your library’s website. If you already go through Nebraska Libraries on the Web, I can help you find a new, more responsive WordPress theme. If you want to make the switch, let me know at amanda.sweet@nebraska.gov.

To learn more about Mobile-first design, check out these resources:

Responsive, Mobile-First Design Matters Now More Than Ever (Intertech)

2019 Web Design Trends (Ironistic)

 

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NCompass Live: A Conversation with Nebraska’s New State Poet, Matt Mason

You’re invited to join us on this Wednesday’s FREE NCompass Live webinar as we chat with Nebraska’s New State Poet, Matt Mason. Matt will discuss how the Nebraska State Poet can work with libraries and schools to promote and encourage appreciation of poetry and literary life in Nebraska.

Along with Nebraska Library Commission Director Rod Wagner and Communication Coordinator Tessa Terry, we will also be joined by Erika Hamilton, Director of Literary Programs at Humanities Nebraska; selection committee member, Chuck Peek; and Brad Modlin, Reynolds Chair of Poetry at the University of Nebraska Kearney.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • May 22 – Picture Book City: Reorganizing Our Storybooks by Subject
  • May 29 – Let’s Get Real About Virtual Reality
  • June 5 – Providing Passports at Your Library
  • July 24 – The Golden Sower Award: Nebraska’s Children’s Choice Literary Award
  • Aug. 28 – Eliminating Late Fines is a Win-Win for Your Library and Community

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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FREE PLA Webinar : Measuring the Success of Health Programs and Services

Public libraries are critical to their community’s health, serving as a go-to resource for individuals to access current and reliable health information. Public library staff have a deep understanding of the unique needs of their communities and the value of serving their patrons’ health needs. Now all they need is the data to prove just how valuable those services are. In this webinar, participants will learn how ’s new health survey will help public libraries measure the success of health programs and services. Participants will also discover helpful resources and training tools to enhance their health services. 

The Project Outcome health survey was developed in partnership with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), dedicated to advancing the progress of medicine and improving public health. To learn more, visit .

At the conclusion of this webinar, participants will:

  • Know resources and training tools to help create and improve health services at their library;
  • Understand how to measure the outcomes of their health-related programs using Project Outcome’s new health survey; and,
  • Be able to apply survey data for decision making and action.

Presenter:

Emily Plagman, manager of impact and advocacy, manages PLA’s performance measurement initiative, Project Outcome. Prior to joining PLA, Emily worked as a project manager at the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning on an energy efficiency grant. Emily received her Master’s in International Public Affairs from the LaFollette School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin and her Bachelor’s in Political Science at Marquette University.

REGISTRATION DETAILS: 

Date: Wednesday, May 29, 2019

Time: 1:00–2:00 p.m. Central Time

Cost: The webinar is free, but registration is required. You can register for this webinar until it begins, or until space is no longer available, whichever comes first.

REGISTER NOW

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2020 Census: Key Roles for Libraries

In 2020, the Census will be conducted primarily online for the first time. Like past e-government efforts, this will likely impact libraries and libraries’ technology resources as staff work to assist people in participating in the Census. The 2020 Census also presents an opportunity to increase public awareness and use of Census data. To best position libraries to support our communities in the 2020 Census, ALA is engaging with the Census Bureau and other stakeholders to ensure that libraries are informed and represented in the policy discussions and planning process. ALA is advocating for a fair, accurate, and inclusive Census that recognizes the roles libraries will play in this vital civic effort.

Want to stay up-to-date on our work to prepare for the 2020 Census? Subscribe to ALA’s Census newsletter.

Why the Census is Important

  • Representation: The decennial count of all U.S. residents is required by the U.S. Constitution to determine representation in Congress and the Electoral College (known as reapportionment). This data is also the basis for drawing districts for federal, state, and local offices (known as redistricting).
  • Funding: The Census is key to the allocation of billions of dollars in federal funding to states and localities (such as grants to states under the Library Services and Technology Act).
  • Information: Data resulting from the Census is widely used by researchers, governments, businesses, and other organizations (to, for example, plan for library services).

Key Roles for Libraries

  • Partners in E-Government: In 2020, the Census Bureau for the first time will encourage residents to complete the Census questionnaire online, starting in March 2020. Like past e-government efforts, this likely will place additional demands on library staff and technology resources to enable people to complete the Census questionnaire. (Other response methods will also be available.) Libraries can use their experience partnering with government to assist their communities in achieving a fair, accurate, and inclusive count.
  • Education and Community Outreach: Libraries have the opportunity to educate their communities about the Census. In the 2010 Census, more than 6,000 library locations hosted Census Bureau outreach activities.
  • Public Spaces: Census Bureau field staff often utilize community rooms in libraries as affordable temporary workspaces, such as for staff hiring and training. Other community stakeholders may also use library meeting rooms to host events related to the 2020 Census.

Advocacy for a Fair, Accurate, and Inclusive Census

Learn More

Courtesy of the American Library Association:  http://www.ala.org/advocacy/govinfo/census

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