Category Archives: Information Resources

Friday Reads: Figures in Silk, by Vanora Bennett

Figures in Silk, by Vanora Bennett, once again falls into my favorite genre to read: historical fiction.  It is a glimpse into early Tudor history: not into life at court itself, but rather into the way that the political machinations affected and disrupted the lives of London’s ordinary citizens and particularly its powerful merchants.

The year is 1471.   Edward IV, who won the throne with the help of his brother, Richard, Duke of Gloucester, is restoring law and order after the long years of war during the War of the Roses. Under Edward IV, life in England begins to improve. Business is booming once more and the printing and silk industries prosper in London.

 

When silk merchant John Lambert marries off his two beautiful daughters, their fortunes are forever changed. Elder daughter Jane Shore begins a notorious liaison with the king while industrious and clever Isabel finds herself married into the house of Claver, a wealthy silk dynasty. Fate delivers Isabel a challenge when her new husband is killed and she is forced into apprenticeship to her mother-in-law, Alice Claver.

Isabel is already an accomplished embroiderer of silk in her own right, but it is from Alice Claver that Isabel learns all there is to know about the silk trade and its’ purchase from Italy, Persia, Spain, Tunisia, and beyond. Isabel learns to make her way in this new world of silk and forges a contract with her sister’s lover, King Edward IV.  This new contract allows Isabel to bring silk production to London for the first time, and to hopefully break the monopoly that Venetian silk makers have over the silk trade.

As Isabel grows in power, and her plan for a silk industry run by Englishwomen is set into motion, the political landscape shifts in dangerous ways.  One sister will fall as the other rises and choices must be made that will change their lives forever.

If you enjoyed Vanora Bennett’s first novel Portrait of an Unknown Woman, you will definitely enjoy Figures in Silk!

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What’s Up Doc? New State Agency Publications at the Nebraska Library Commission

New state agency publications have been received at the Nebraska Library Commission for September 2017.  Included are reports from the Nebraska Auditor of Public Accounts, the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, the Nebraska Secretary of State, and new books from the University of Nebraska Press, to name a few.

All items, except the books from the University of Nebraska Press, are available for immediate viewing and printing by clicking on the highlighted .pdf link above, or directly in the .pdf below.

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Free Webinar! Back to School: School Library Legislation in the Statehouses

Fewer than half of all states currently require a school librarian in their public schools. In recent years, however, legislation has been introduced in several additional states. Who is leading these efforts and what insights can they share with the rest of us? We will hear from three states and follow their presentations with a facilitated discussion for participants.  The representatives from the three states are:

Debra Kachel, Legislative Liaison, Pennsylvania School Librarians Association

James Keehbler, Former President, New Jersey Library Association

Mernie Maestas, President, Missouri Association of School Librarians

When: Wednesday, September 27, 2017, 2:00:00 PM CDT – 3:00:00 PM CDT

Register here!

Attendance during the live webinar is free and open to all. A seat in the webinar is reserved for the first 100 logins.

All registrants will receive a link to the recorded webinar if it fills to capacity.

The link to the recording will be available at http://www.ala.org/advocacy/chapter-advocacy-exchange

This webinar is brought to you by the American Association of School Librarians (AASL), the Chapter Relations Office (CRO), and the Office for Library Advocacy (OLA) as part of our State Ecosystems initiative to strengthen coalitions across libraries.

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Free Nebraska Statehood 150 Videos!

Did you know that Nebraska Statehood 150 has a whole series of short YouTube videos, titled NOW YOU KNOW NEBRASKA!, about the history, culture, people, government, and places of Nebraska?

Click here to watch: NOW YOU KNOW NEBRASKA!

Excellent resource for learning and teaching about Nebraska History!

The first week’s videos are presented by current Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts, but the rest are presented by various kids and adults.  VERY informative, fun, quick facts about Nebraska!

Five videos per week, beginning with January 9th, 2017.

 

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Free Nebraska Statehood 150 Event!

Salute to the Good Life : A Gala Tribute to Nebraska’s History, Culture and Military Personnel

Webpage

Friday, September 22

4:00 PM – 10:30 PM
Centennial Mall South | Lincoln
Free Admission | Family Friendly
Festival Seating | Bring Your Own Lawn Chairs or Blankets

Food Trucks| Laser Light Show | Fireworks | Remembering our Fallen Memorial | Emceed By Broadcast House

Schedule:

Truckin’ Through Nebraska | A Mobile Children’s Museum
Open 3:00-7:00 p.m.

Food Trucks
3:00-11:00 p.m.

Nebraska National Guard Band
4:00-4:45 p.m.

Josh Hoyer
5:00-6:00 p.m.

The Back 40
6:15-7:30 p.m.

Kris Lager Band
7:45-8:45 p.m.

Laser Light Show
8:45-9:05 p.m.

Kris Lager Band
9:10-10:10 p.m.

Fireworks Finale
10:10-10:30 p.m.

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NCompass Live: Empowering Immigrant Community Members Through Education & Information

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘Empowering Immigrant Community Members Through Education & Information’, on Wednesday, September 20, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

Libraries in the United States have a long history of providing resources and educational programming to immigrants. Today, this role is especially relevant with the increasing immigrant population in addition to increasing uncertainty regarding the new administration’s policies on immigration. Libraries have a unique opportunity and responsibility to not only welcome our immigrant community members, but also to provide information and educational opportunities to protect and empower our immigrant friends, neighbors, and patrons.

Presenter: Mindy Rush Chipman, Senior Managing Attorney, Justice For Our Neighbors-Nebraska.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Sept. 27 – Weeding Your Library Collection
  • Oct. 11 – NO NCOMPASS LIVE THIS WEEK – Enjoy the 2017 NLA/NSLA Annual Conference! Check out the full program and register.
  • Oct. 18 – ALA Book Club Central
  • Oct. 25 – Google Forms for Your Library
  • Nov. 8 – Using YA Literature to Inspire Teen Girls’ Interests in STEM

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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The Undivided Back

Scandinavian Young Women's Christian Association of AmericaWhen looking at old postcards in Nebraska Memories have you noticed that some of them have writing on the front of the card or that there is a lot of white space around the picture on the postcard? This may be because in the early days people were not allowed to write a message on the back of the postcard next to the address.

The Smithsonian Institution provides a nice history of postcards starting in 1861 when the US Congress passed an act that allowed privately printed cards to be sent in the mail.

A Promenade, Krug Park, Omaha's Polite ResortLater legislation passed in 1873 allowed the government to produce postcards with a message on one side and an address on the other side. These government postcards could be mailed for 1¢ however privately created postcards cost 2¢ to mail. In 1898 the prices were changeed so all postcards required just a 1¢ stamp. Other laws were enacted between 1898 and 1906 that changed the requirements on what information must be printed on the back of a postcard however; people were still not allowed to write a message on the back of the card next to the address.

Americans were finally allowed to write on the backside of the postcards in 1907. According to the 1906 Post-Office Department Annual Reports for the Fiscal Year ended June 30, 1906, this change came about after the meeting of the Universal Postal Union that took place in Rome. After a bit of research, I learned that Universal Postal Union (UPU) is the international organization that sets the rules for international mail exchange. The UPU was established in 1874.Scotts Bluff, Nebr.

The change to allow writing on both sides of the card came about because of public request. Folks did not want to write a message on or next to the images on the front side of the cards. European countries were the first to make this change. Starting on October 31, 1906 the US Post Office started allowing postcards mailed from foreign countries to be delivered in the US with writing on the back. On March 1, 1907, the US Post Office allowed postcards mailed domestically to have written messages on the left side of the card next to the address. If you read the original text in the 1906 US Post  Office report, you will see that they refer to the side of the postcard that contains the address to be the front of the postcard.

This period between 1901 and 1907, when folks were not allowed to write on the back of the postcard has become known as the Undivided Back Period. All of the postcards included in this post are from Nebraska Memories and examples from the Undivided Back Period. Looking at the back of these postcards, you will see that all of them contain a printed message that makes it clear that the only thing that can be put on the back of the postcard is the address.

U. S. Post Office, Omaha, Nebr.Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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Free Webinar! Beyond Books: Public Libraries Address the Social Determinants of Health

Beyond Books: Public libraries address the social determinants of health Breezing Along with the RML from NNLM MCR

September 20, 2017 10am MT/11am CT

Register

Join Anna Morgan from the Healthy Library Initiative as she discusses public libraries, their influence on social determinants of health, and their importance for community well-being. The Healthy Library Initiative has worked with Philadelphia area public libraries in identifying how the libraries address social determinants of health and how they can build on those programs. To read more about Healthy Library Initiative and what they do, visit http://www.healthylibrary.org/.

Presenter

Anna Uma Morgan, MD, MSc, MSHP is a general internist and recently completed the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Morgan’s work is focused on community-based interventions for addressing the social determinants of health. As a clinical scholar, she worked primarily with the Healthy Library Initiative, a partnership between Penn and the Free Library of Philadelphia aimed at harnessing the power of public libraries to improve population health. She continues to practice primary care in underserved populations.

 

Questions? Contact:

Annette Parde-Maass

Education and Outreach Coordinator

National Network of Libraries of Medicine | MidContinental Region

Creighton University Health Sciences Library

AnnetteParde-Maass@creighton.edu

402.280.4156

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Free Webinar! Libraries Transform: Health Literacy Toolkit

Libraries Transform: Health Literacy Toolkit

Register

Date: September 14, 2017

Time: 12-1pm MT/1-2pm CT

Description: October is Health Literacy Month. The American Library Association (ALA) and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) have created a Health Literacy Month toolkit for the Libraries Transform campaign. Join Amanda J. Wilson (NNLM) and Jeff Julian (ALA) as they discuss NNLM’s mission to support health literacy efforts in libraries and explain how to use the key messages, data, and marketing materials to promote health literacy at your library.

1 MLA CE is offered for this session

 

Annette Parde-Maass

Education and Outreach Coordinator

National Network of Libraries of Medicine | MidContinental Region

Creighton University Health Sciences Library

AnnetteParde-Maass@creighton.edu

402.280.4156

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What’s Up Doc? New State Agency Publications at the Nebraska Library Commission

New state agency publications have been received at the Nebraska Library Commission for July 2017.  Included are reports from the Nebraska Department of Agriculture, the Nebraska State Board of Health, the Nebraska Department of Motor Vehicles, and new books from the University of Nebraska Press, to name a few.

All items, except the books from the University of Nebraska Press, and the Local Emergency Operations Plans, are available for immediate viewing and printing by clicking on the highlighted .pdf link.

Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training, General, Information Resources, Uncategorized, What's Up Doc / Govdocs | Leave a comment

2017 Solar Eclipse–One Week From Today!

2017 Solar Eclipse PosterThe solar event of the century is only a little over 6 days away–the 2017 Total Eclipse!

Just as a last blog post about the Eclipse before the big day, I wanted to point out an awesome video that I came across this past weekend.

One of the best, because it’s Nebraska specific, is the “movie trailer” below, produced by the Hyde Memorial Observatory in Lincoln:

So enjoy, have fun, and be safe!

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New Public Library Toolkit for Consumer Health Information Resources

The McGoogan Library of Medicine at University of Nebraska Medical Center has created a new Public Library Toolkit to support Nebraska public librarians in delivering consumer health information to their communities. The toolkit provides links to training resources for librarians, and state and local health statistics to help with program planning. It also provides websites for consumers that cover health and wellness, finding healthcare, financial assistance, and caregiver support.

McGoogan Library has been serving the consumer health information needs of Nebraska citizens for over 30 years. The library continues to seek opportunities to support and collaborate with public libraries. If you have feedback or suggestions for the toolkit, please contact Christian Minter, Community Engagement & Health Literacy Librarian at christian.minter@unmc.edu or 402-559-7226.

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What’s Up Doc? New State Agency Publications at the Nebraska Library Commission

New state agency publications have been received at the Nebraska Library Commission for July 2017.  Included are reports from the Nebraska Auditor of Public Accounts, annual reports and information guides from the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, and new books from the University of Nebraska Press, to name a few.

All items, except the books from the University of Nebraska Press, are available for immediate viewing and printing by clicking on the highlighted .pdf link.

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Public Library Survey Tip No. 6

Today marks the end of the Bibliostat tip series. We will focus on the federal question of capturing and reporting the number of Wi-Fi sessions your library has in the reporting period (your fiscal year). The idea behind this is that communities may lack areas providing free Wi-Fi, and the local public library often fills that gap. The difficulty lies with how to accurately capture this data, especially in smaller libraries that lack full time IT tech support. Real time technical solutions do exist, but for most these aren’t practical. Today I’ll offer you a simple potential solution to more accurately capture a representative sample of who is using your Wi-Fi. As most of you know, data for the public library survey is sometimes estimated from captured data from an “average week”. In other words, you take a representative sample during a typical time period (e.g. for the number of library visitors you count everyone during a week in the spring, summer, fall, and winter) and then you do a bit of math to get the reported annual figures.

So the question really is how you more accurately get this sample for Wi-Fi uses? And what about the kids in the parking lot that are using your Wi-Fi? Some libraries have taken to following people around to see if they have a laptop, tablet, or smartphone, and then recording that data (called an “observation estimate”), but who really wants to do that (and it might be more than a bit creepy depending on the circumstances). So here is another option. If you have an android or apple device (e.g. smartphone) capturing these representative samples just got a little easier and a little more accurate, but it does take a bit of work during your sample time period. First, you need to get an app that tells you what devices are connected to your Wi-Fi at a particular point in time. You could search the App Store (Apple) or the Play Store (Android) at length for network scanners or terms such as who is using my Wi-Fi, but I’ll give you a couple of apps that are available for free and work fairly well. These are Fing and EZ Net Scan. In no way am I endorsing these over others; these are just two examples. You should try some out and see what might fit your needs. Downloading these apps offers you the ability, when you are connected to the library Wi-Fi, to see all the other devices that are connected to the same Wi-Fi network. So ideally you would start at a particular point in time, write down the IP addresses for the connected devices, and then re-scan every so often (say every 15-30 minutes) to see if any new devices are connected, or if a device drops connections. Once you collect the data during the sample time period, you just do your math to get an annual figure. Worst case scenario is that you capture data for a typical day and then multiply by the number of days in a year you are open. Better case is that you take a sample for a defined time period, such as a typical day during each of the four seasons (spring, summer, winter, and fall).  Shaka.

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Solar Eclipse Resources Part Three: 39 Days and Counting…

The countdown to the celestial event of the century continues…only 5 weeks, 4 days, 19 hrs, and 56 mins!

Is your library ready? In 39 days, on August 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse will sweep across the United States. The sight of the fully eclipsed Sun will be visible along a 70-mile-wide path arching from Oregon to South Carolina, and Nebraska will be one of the BEST places in the country to view it!  Millions of people are expected to travel to this “path of totality” to watch as the moon entirely covers the face of the Sun.

To help your library prepare for this historic event, the Nebraska Library Commission is doing a series of blog posts about resources you can access for your Eclipse programs:

Part 3: Eclipse Programming and Activity Ideas for your Library

Sorting Games: How Big? How Far? How Hot?

This NASA@ My Library Activity Guide will help library staff facilitate these sorting activities in large or small groups, with patrons from Pre-K to adult.

Using simple materials, participants explore the vast distance between the Earth and Moon and model how solar and lunar eclipses happen.

Scale Model of Sun and Earth

This is a lesson about size and scale, also called the Solar Pizza.

Make a Pinhole Viewer — Shipping Box Version

Use a long box or tube and other common materials to create a safe way to view the Sun.

Make a Pinhole Viewer — Cereal Box Version

Use a cereal box and other common materials to create a safe way to view the Sun.

Sun Cookies

Learners will use candy pieces and a cookie to make an accurate model of the Sun that they can eat.

Guest Speaker Talks

Connect with your local college or university astronomy department, science museum or high school science or astronomy teacher to see what they’re planning for the eclipse. Ask if someone could give a public talk about the eclipse.

Host an Eclipse Watch Party

Besides watching the eclipse, activities might include arts and crafts, providing handouts, and having local speakers.

Have fun checking out all the resources available, and stay tuned next week for Solar Eclipse Resources Part Four!

 

**Note for Nebraska Libraries: 

The Nebraska Library Commission has received a shipment of Eclipse viewing glasses for free distribution:

 

  • Only libraries that are hosting Eclipse events are eligible to receive free glasses
  • Libraries are welcome to request and pick up glasses directly from the Library Commission in Lincoln.
  • Regional Systems will have glasses available at upcoming meetings.
  • Contact Mary Jo Ryan at the Nebraska Library Commission.

Experience the 2017 Eclipse Across America Banner Image

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What’s Up Doc? New State Agency Publications at the Nebraska Library Commission

New state agency publications have been received at the Nebraska Library Commission for June 2017.  Included are Correctional Services reports, Economic Development reports, state Investments reports, and Workers’ Comp reports, to name a few.

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What’s New with National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region

First, A little about the NNLM:

The mission of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is to advance the progress of medicine and improve the public health by providing all U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information and improving the public’s access to information to enable them to make informed decisions about their health. The Program is coordinated by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and carried out through a nationwide network of health science libraries and information centers. To better serve these network libraries, health professionals, and public, there are NNLM Coordinators throughout the country providing outreach, training, and assistance and promoting free, open, and reliable resources from NLM and other reputable institutions. The Coordinator for the NNLM MidContinental Region is Annette Parde-Maass, serving Nebraska and supporting the bigger MidContinental Region (MCR).

What’s new with NNLM MCR:

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region (NNLM MCR) has introduced a number of new pieces this past year – new acronym (from NN/LM to NNLM), logos, website format, blog format, class registration system, webinar recordings on YouTube, cross-regional collaboration, twitter account, and even a staff change. As of July 1, Annette Parde-Maas will move to full-time Education and Outreach for NNLM MCR as Christian Minter transitions to a full-time position at UNMC’s McGoogan Library. Her focus will still include community outreach and you will likely still interact with her as she promotes UNMC’s Consumer Health Information Resource Service (CHIRS). While NNLM MCR will miss her, we are fortunate to continue to have her serving the state.

You might be wondering with all that change if anything has stayed the same. NNLM MCR still offers trainings, and it is easier than ever to sign up for sessions from other NNLM and NLM entities. For example, if you see an online course you want to take from the Greater Midwest Region (GMR), you can sign up for that. If you wish a course or webinar would be offered specifically for your institution and/or face-to-face in Nebraska, contact me. The Bringing Health Information to the Community (BHIC) blog may have a new look but the purpose is still the same. For member libraries, NNLM MCR offer various funding opportunities from Technology Improvement to Consumer Health and Disaster Information specializations certification. If you are not sure if your library is a member, check the Member Directory. If you were a member but need to renew, contact me for assistance. If you would like to join the network, check our Membership page. You can join as long you are providing health information through a library, information center, or other organization. Membership is free.

If you have questions, would like to schedule a training or site visit, or need a health information resource, please contact Annette Parde-Maass, and she will be happy to help:

Annette Parde-Maass,

NNLM MCR Education and Outreach Coordinator

AnnetteParde-Maass@creighton.edu, 402.280.4156

 

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NCompass Live: PubMed, PubMed Central, MEDLINE, MedlinePlus…

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘PubMed, PubMed Central, MEDLINE, MedlinePlus…’, on Wednesday, July 5, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

They’re not the same? What’s the difference? How would I use them? If these are questions you have, join Annette Parde-Maass, from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, as she gives a brief overview of these free databases from the National Library of Medicine, showcases some useful features, and takes your questions about these robust sites.

Presenter: Annette Parde-Maass, Community and Global Health Librarian, Creighton University Health Sciences Library, National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • July 12 – From Collections to Commons: How we turned stacks to student spaces at UNL
  • July 19 – Finding Your Focus: Tips for Early Career Success
  • July 26 – Solar Eclipse 2017 @ Your Library

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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A Fresh Perspective

Nebraska Memories contains thousands of images. Many of these images show buildings and street scenes from across the state. When the metadata that accompanies these images includes an address I like to find the location on a map. Finding the location on an online map is easy but since so many of the buildings have changed over the past 100+ years I don’t always find it helpful. When I saw the Library of Congress’s (LOC) announcement that they were providing access to nearly 25,000 Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps I was thrilled. At this time, the maps from sixteen states are available. Lucky for us one of those states in Nebraska. Currently all of the maps available were published prior to 1900.

If you’ve never seen a Sanborn Fire Insurance Map before they may seem a bit odd the first time you look at one. As the name implies, these maps were created for assessing fire insurance liability. On the maps, you will see the outline of buildings along with information about building materials, the number of doors and windows and the amount of hose available. If you need help understanding all of the abbreviations and symbols on the map like I did, I’d suggest you look at the LOC’s About this Collection page.

I started exploring the Sanborn maps by first picking a few photos in Nebraska Memories and then trying to locate them on one of the maps. As I looked at different places on the map, I realized how much information was available. That information combine with seeing how a building related to other structures around it provided me with a fresh perspective of images I’ve viewed multiple times.Beet sugar factory, Grand Island, Neb

One photo that I selected was the Beet sugar factory, Grand Island, Neb. On the photo, note the two raised sections on the roof and the smoke that is rising from behind the building.American Beet Sugar Co. Now let’s look at the 1899 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Grand Island, Hall County, Nebraska. I found the American Beet Sugar Co. located on image 18 of the map. Under the name, it says, “2 Miles S. W. of P.O.”. The P.O. as you may have guessed stands for post office. I’ve included a screen shot of paragraph of information available on the map. As you read it, remember these are fire insurance maps.

Sanborn MapOn the drawing of the building, do you see the yellow square with the long yellow rectangle below it? It looks like a yellow i in the middle of the building. If you zoom in on the original map image you can see the words “Tank on R’F.” next to the square and “Vent in R’F” next to the rectangle. Now look to the left of the main building and find the building with the think black lines and small circles. The black lines represent steam boilers. The circles are iron chimneys. The circle with the black dot in the middle is the fire pump. I’m assuming the smoke or steam that we see in the picture is coming from this building. Taking these three pieces of information and comparing it to the photo, I would guess this picture shows the east side of the factory. Looking at the map, you will see other features of the factory such as the “underground sluice” that connects the beet shed to the main building and the “Molasses Reservoir (underground) Wood Cover”. These maps were drawn to scale so we can see that the reservoir is huge. Other areas I noticed include washers, brushes, slicing machine, granulator, press room and lime slackers.

Next, I located the Union College campus on image 47 of the 1891 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Lincoln, Lancaster County, Nebraska. The Union College, Ella Johnson Crandall Memorial Library has a collection of 100+ images in Nebraska Memories so I knew there were many photos available.

Sandborn mapWhen you look at this map or any of the Sanborn maps, make sure you look for the compass rose on the map and locate north. At first I had assumed the top of the map was north but quickly learned that is not always true. The location of north can even change from one image to the next. If you look at the full version of the Union College map, you will see that north is to the left.

The map shows five buildings located on campus. There are images of the three largest building in Nebraska Memories. Because these three buildings have been torn down, this map gives us a better perspective on exactly where they were located in relationship to each other. Remember that these maps are drawn to scale.Union College administration building

  • Main Building or the Administration Building – It is located at the bottom center of the map. It’s noted on the map that it was built in 1891.
  • North Hall – This building is located to the left or north of the admin building. A note on the map states that this hall is currently being built.  South Hall
  • South Hall – As you can guess, this building is to the right or south of the admin building. The map also notes that this building was built in 1891.

At the top left of the map is a building that is labeled “Bolier R’m 1st Laundry 2d” with the note “To Be Built as Shown”. There are two photos of the Union College laundry building in Nebraska Memories but the photos are from the 1940’s. I don’t have enough information to know if the building in the photo is the same building that is pictured on the map.

Garneau Cracker FactoryIn the 1887 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Omaha, Douglas And Sarpy County, Nebraska I located the Garneau Cracker Factory on image 20. This building was located on the northwest corner of 12th and Jackson St. While it was interesting looking at the building and learning that they did the mixing on the 3rd floor and baking on the 2nd what really caught my eye was the last line in the blurb about the building. The line states “1 Doz. Hand Grenades”. Sanborn MapI must admit that I had to stop and think about that one for a few seconds until I remembered that this is a fire insurance map. Those hand grenades were actually fire extinguishers. They were glass containers that were filled with a chemical. You were supposed to throw them at the fire causing the glass to break and releasing the chemical. If you would like to know more about them, I found a newspaper story in the 1884 Pacific Rural Press that includes a picture and description.

First Sidney schoolI must admit that not all of my attempts to locate buildings on a map were instantly successful. For example, the Cheyenne County Historical Society and Museum has a collection of 77 images in Nebraska Memories that cover a large span of time. In the LOC collection, there are two Sanborn maps for Sidney. One is from 1887 and the other is from 1892. Unfortunately, many of the buildings are not labeled with store names. I was able to find the First Sidney school on image 2 of the 1887 map.  It’s located at the corner of 1st St. and Chestnut.

Sandborn MapAfter looking at the Sanborn maps and a current map of Sidney, I’m starting to wonder if the street names have been changed. For example, the note included on the photo of the M.E. Church, Sidney, Nebr. states, “This church, built in 1919, replaced the Methodist Church built in 1884 on the same spot.” The record also states that the church is located at corner of 11th and Jackson Streets and currently is the Sidney Arts Center. I looked at a current map and was able to find the building located across the street from the county court house. On image 2 of the 1887 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Sidney, Cheyenne County, Nebraska I located a building labeled “M.E Church” that was also located across the street from a building labeled “County Offs.” These buildings were located at the corner of 1st St. and Myrtle. If I’m correct, that means 1st St. on the Sanborn maps is now Jackson St. and Myrtle is now 11th Ave. With a bit more work, I’m sure it would be possible to match more of the photos with buildings on the map.

M.E. Church, Sidney, Nebr.I hope you enjoyed viewing these historical images, along with additional information available on the historical Sanborn maps. If you would like to do your own research there are plenty more images in Nebraska Memories and a long list of Nebraska Sanborn maps.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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Public Library Survey Tip No. 1

Today marks the start of a multi-part weekly series of tips for collecting data for your next public library survey using Bibliostat. Yes, I know, it seems like this survey just ended, and it did, but you should be collecting your data now for input into the next survey when the cycle begins this coming November. Keep in mind that the next survey covers the time period of your library’s fiscal year, which in most cases is either October 1 to September 30 OR July 1 to June 30. A few libraries have fiscal years that run from January 1 to December 31. A quick reminder about terminology: Bibliostat is the vendor that we use to collect the data, but the survey itself is the IMLS public library survey. Today’s post will focus on programs in general. Most of you know what a library program is, but to clarify what you count for a program on this survey, here is the definition:

A program is any planned event which introduces the group attending to any of the broad range of library services or activities or which directly provides information to participants.

Now that is pretty broad, so here is your cheat sheet:

  • Library tours can be counted as programs;
  • Examples of some programs include film showings, lectures, story hours, English and citizenship classes, and book discussion groups;
  • Do NOT count library services that are provided on a one-on-one basis (such as computer assistance or one-on-one homework help);
  • Count programs that the library either sponsors or co-sponsors;
  • Count programs even if they are held off-site (not at the library); and
  • If a program is offered in a series, count each program in the series (e.g. if you have a discussion group that meets 6 times, that counts as 6 programs).

As always, if you have any questions about what to count or not count, feel free to let me know. Next week we will expand on the program counts to include specific children’s and young adult programs. One final note, if you might not have been counting some programs you should have been counting, and now you are, your count will likely increase from what was reported in the prior year’s survey. If this is the case, it might trigger an edit check in Bibliostat. This means that you will need to enter a note in the note field explaining the increase (or decrease). It is perfectly acceptable to put something in that field such as “we did not count programs held off site last year, and this year we did”. Shaka.

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