Category Archives: Library Management

New Public Library Toolkit for Consumer Health Information Resources

The McGoogan Library of Medicine at University of Nebraska Medical Center has created a new Public Library Toolkit to support Nebraska public librarians in delivering consumer health information to their communities. The toolkit provides links to training resources for librarians, and state and local health statistics to help with program planning. It also provides websites for consumers that cover health and wellness, finding healthcare, financial assistance, and caregiver support.

McGoogan Library has been serving the consumer health information needs of Nebraska citizens for over 30 years. The library continues to seek opportunities to support and collaborate with public libraries. If you have feedback or suggestions for the toolkit, please contact Christian Minter, Community Engagement & Health Literacy Librarian at christian.minter@unmc.edu or 402-559-7226.

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Public Library Survey Tip No. 6

Today marks the end of the Bibliostat tip series. We will focus on the federal question of capturing and reporting the number of Wi-Fi sessions your library has in the reporting period (your fiscal year). The idea behind this is that communities may lack areas providing free Wi-Fi, and the local public library often fills that gap. The difficulty lies with how to accurately capture this data, especially in smaller libraries that lack full time IT tech support. Real time technical solutions do exist, but for most these aren’t practical. Today I’ll offer you a simple potential solution to more accurately capture a representative sample of who is using your Wi-Fi. As most of you know, data for the public library survey is sometimes estimated from captured data from an “average week”. In other words, you take a representative sample during a typical time period (e.g. for the number of library visitors you count everyone during a week in the spring, summer, fall, and winter) and then you do a bit of math to get the reported annual figures.

So the question really is how you more accurately get this sample for Wi-Fi uses? And what about the kids in the parking lot that are using your Wi-Fi? Some libraries have taken to following people around to see if they have a laptop, tablet, or smartphone, and then recording that data (called an “observation estimate”), but who really wants to do that (and it might be more than a bit creepy depending on the circumstances). So here is another option. If you have an android or apple device (e.g. smartphone) capturing these representative samples just got a little easier and a little more accurate, but it does take a bit of work during your sample time period. First, you need to get an app that tells you what devices are connected to your Wi-Fi at a particular point in time. You could search the App Store (Apple) or the Play Store (Android) at length for network scanners or terms such as who is using my Wi-Fi, but I’ll give you a couple of apps that are available for free and work fairly well. These are Fing and EZ Net Scan. In no way am I endorsing these over others; these are just two examples. You should try some out and see what might fit your needs. Downloading these apps offers you the ability, when you are connected to the library Wi-Fi, to see all the other devices that are connected to the same Wi-Fi network. So ideally you would start at a particular point in time, write down the IP addresses for the connected devices, and then re-scan every so often (say every 15-30 minutes) to see if any new devices are connected, or if a device drops connections. Once you collect the data during the sample time period, you just do your math to get an annual figure. Worst case scenario is that you capture data for a typical day and then multiply by the number of days in a year you are open. Better case is that you take a sample for a defined time period, such as a typical day during each of the four seasons (spring, summer, winter, and fall).  Shaka.

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Public Library Survey Tip No. 5

Shaka. There are two more installments in this series of Bibliostat tips, and both will focus on library technology. Today we will take a look at internet connections and speed. There are two relevant questions: (1) What is the type of your internet connection; and (2) What is your download speed. For the type of your connection, if you don’t know, you will need to ask your internet service provider (ISP) to confirm. These are things like DSL, Cable, Fiber Optic, Satellite, etc. The trickier part to the survey is reporting your download speed, because there are a variety of factors that could affect your speed test. There are a number of different websites and online tools to measure your speed, but we like to recommend the NDT (Network Diagnostic Tool). Completing a test is easy by going to this site and clicking on “Start Test”. After a few minutes, a report will kick out that will tell you what your download speed is. A few things to keep in mind: It’s best to do a test at various times during an “average day”. If you only do one test or test at the same time every day, you are not likely to get an accurate sample of your actual speed. Also, try and perform tests both from your Wi-Fi and over a wired connection, as there might be some variance between the two. When you do multiple tests, report the average speed.

The takeaway from collecting this data on your end is that you have a more accurate picture of what speed you are offering compared to what you are actually paying for. Secondly, the speed tests might flag other network issues that you need to look into. For instance, if your wired speed is consistently 60 Mbps, and your Wi-Fi speed lags far behind that, then you might have issues that need to be investigated (such as your Wi-Fi router, it’s range, or some other issue). Finally, measuring your speed is helpful as a comparison tool; you can compare what your library offers compared to your peer libraries.

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Public Library Survey Tip No. 4

Shaka. Today’s public library survey data collection tip (part 4) takes a look at library collections and databases (or “electronic collections”). For those of you who subscribe to local databases or have vendors other than Nebraska OverDrive, this can be a difficult task. But if you only have Nebraska OverDrive here’s the good news: We pull the data for those holdings and circulations and prefill it on your survey. Recently, the survey has been redesigned so that for eBooks, Audiobooks, and downloadable video you only report current holdings. No more of that eBooks added and deleted business.

On the survey there are sections for reporting eBooks, Audiobooks, downloadable video titles, and databases/electronic collections. If you subscribe to a service or have a vendor other than Nebraska OverDrive, how do you determine where to report that service/vendor and the number of uses? It depends, but the key question here is: Do the items circulate for a set period, or are they permanently retained by the patron? If they circulate for a set period, then you report in two areas: (1) the library collections portion of the survey (under eBooks, Audiobooks, and downloadable video); and (2) the circulation portion of the survey (adult or children’s). Sometimes, vendors offer a package of items that the library does not select, and that are paid for based on their selection by the patron. For these, you report the number of times the item was selected by the patron, both as holdings and circulation. Sometimes it can be difficult to ascertain whether or not the circulation was children’s or adult. If in doubt, or it isn’t clear, we suggest reporting it under the adult category.

If items are permanently retained by the patron, count each vendor as one local database and report the number of uses (generally this would be a download or a stream in the case of audio or video). Finally, our survey is set up for databases as a repeating group, so we first ask how many total local databases you subscribe to, then we ask you to name each one and report the number of times it was used. To illustrate, say that you have 3 local databases (Example: Zinio, Freegal, and Mango Languages). You first enter the name of the first database (Zinio), and then enter the number of times it was used, then click on Save, then click Add Group to enter the next database (Freegal) and its number of uses.

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Public Library Survey Tip No. 3

Today we have part 3 in our public library survey data collection series. We will focus on expenditures. First off, for this survey you report what you actually spent in the listed categories. Most of the time, this is different than the amount that was budgeted. As such, your reported expenditures shouldn’t be nice round numbers, and should be at least slightly different than what you reported last year. A common issue that arises is the reporting of expenditures for employee benefits. The employee benefit expenditure includes things such as payments for health insurance and retirement, but also social security and FICA (Federal Insurance Contributions Act). This is a bit confusing because FICA typically includes both Social Security and Medicare. In the category, you need to report all of these payments, and the only way it can be a $0 is if you are paid as an independent contractor. If that’s the case, and rarely but sometimes it is, then enter “librarian is paid as an independent contractor” in the note field on the survey because this will undoubtedly come up on an edit check. A few other items of note about expenditures:

  • For library materials in electronic format, you report expenditures for eBooks, Audiobooks, e-serials (electronic journals), databases, electronic maps, downloadable videos, and pictures in electronic or digital format;
  • Other materials expenditures includes physical items that aren’t books. These typically are DVD’s, CD’s, microfilm, and other things like cake pans, puzzles, games, puppets, toys, and art;
  • Capital expenditures should match or come close to matching what you report in capital revenue. However, keep in mind that sometimes funds are allocated in the previous fiscal year, so the capital revenue was reported on last year’s survey even though the expenditure is reported on the current survey;
  • Capital expenditures are “major one time projects”, and examples include: (a) site acquisitions; (b) new buildings; (c) additions to or renovation of library buildings; (d) furnishings, equipment, and initial book stock for new buildings, building additions, or building renovations; (e) library automation systems (initial purchase of); (f) new vehicles; and (g) other one-time major projects. Examples include new roofs, new carpet, new windows, sidewalks, etc.; and
  • There sometimes is confusion about what to report as computer hardware, accessories, and software and “electronic access”. These are two different categories. For electronic access, you report maintenance or consortium fees association with your integrated library system or costs associated with accessing the internet. For the computer part (hardware, accessories, and software), you report items that are for both staff and public use.

Shaka.

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NCompass Live: From Collections to Commons: How we turned stacks to student spaces at UNL

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘From Collections to Commons: How we turned stacks to student spaces at UNL’, on Wednesday, July 12, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries found itself on a fast track to create a 21,000 square foot learning commons in the spring of 2014. Preparations included moving 400,000 volumes off the floor, working with architects, construction managers and furniture vendors to plan the space and select a vendor to provide a coffee shop/bakery. The Adele Coryell Hall Learning Commons opened as scheduled in January of 2016. Our presentation will cover the planning and construction phases as well as management of the space since the opening.

Presenters: Regina Flowers, Adele Hall Learning Commons Manager; Deb Pearson, Head, Libraries Facilities and Planning; Michael Straatmann, Circulation Manager; University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • July 19 – Finding Your Focus: Tips for Early Career Success
  • July 26 – Solar Eclipse 2017 @ Your Library

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Public Library Survey Tip No. 2

Part 2 in our public library survey data collection series takes programming a step further, focusing specifically on children’s and young adult programs. Reporting these programs can be a bit tricky, mostly because of difficulty in determining which category to count the program. Taking into consideration the fact that some of these programs may overlap and actually draw persons from both the children’s and young adult age groups, you might need to make a determination of what category to put your program in based on the nature of the program. Specifically, what is the primary intended audience? Children (for purposes of this survey) are defined as persons age 11 and under. Young adults (for purposes of this survey) are defined as persons age 12 to 18. Here is your extended cheat sheet:

  • Story times and summer reading events should be counted as programs;
  • Do NOT count library services that are provided on a one-on-one basis (such as computer assistance or one-on-one homework help);
  • Count programs that the library either sponsors or co-sponsors;
  • Count programs even if they are held off-site (not at the library);
  • If a program is offered in a series, count each program in the series (e.g. if you have a discussion group that meets 6 times, that counts as 6 programs); and
  • IMPORTANT: For children’s program attendance – “Include adults who attend programs intended primarily for children.” And: For young adults – “Please count all patrons that attend the young adult programs regardless of age.”

Shaka.

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Public Library Survey Tip No. 1

Today marks the start of a multi-part weekly series of tips for collecting data for your next public library survey using Bibliostat. Yes, I know, it seems like this survey just ended, and it did, but you should be collecting your data now for input into the next survey when the cycle begins this coming November. Keep in mind that the next survey covers the time period of your library’s fiscal year, which in most cases is either October 1 to September 30 OR July 1 to June 30. A few libraries have fiscal years that run from January 1 to December 31. A quick reminder about terminology: Bibliostat is the vendor that we use to collect the data, but the survey itself is the IMLS public library survey. Today’s post will focus on programs in general. Most of you know what a library program is, but to clarify what you count for a program on this survey, here is the definition:

A program is any planned event which introduces the group attending to any of the broad range of library services or activities or which directly provides information to participants.

Now that is pretty broad, so here is your cheat sheet:

  • Library tours can be counted as programs;
  • Examples of some programs include film showings, lectures, story hours, English and citizenship classes, and book discussion groups;
  • Do NOT count library services that are provided on a one-on-one basis (such as computer assistance or one-on-one homework help);
  • Count programs that the library either sponsors or co-sponsors;
  • Count programs even if they are held off-site (not at the library); and
  • If a program is offered in a series, count each program in the series (e.g. if you have a discussion group that meets 6 times, that counts as 6 programs).

As always, if you have any questions about what to count or not count, feel free to let me know. Next week we will expand on the program counts to include specific children’s and young adult programs. One final note, if you might not have been counting some programs you should have been counting, and now you are, your count will likely increase from what was reported in the prior year’s survey. If this is the case, it might trigger an edit check in Bibliostat. This means that you will need to enter a note in the note field explaining the increase (or decrease). It is perfectly acceptable to put something in that field such as “we did not count programs held off site last year, and this year we did”. Shaka.

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NCompass Live: The New NLA Intellectual Freedom Manual Comes to the Rescue

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘The New NLA Intellectual Freedom Manual Comes to the Rescue’, on Wednesday, June 28, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

The Nebraska Library Association Intellectual Freedom (IF) Round Table spent the previous year updating the outdated manual from 2004. Join us to learn about the process, important changes to Intellectual Freedom in the digital age, how to report challenged material, and how the manual can help libraries throughout the state.

Presenters: Michael Elsener, Tim Lentz, and Todd Schlechte, Intellectual Freedom Round Table.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • July 5 – PubMed, PubMed Central, MEDLINE, MedlinePlus…
  • July 12 – From Collections to Commons: How we turned stacks to student spaces at UNL
  • July 19 – Finding Your Focus: Tips for Early Career Success
  • July 26 – Solar Eclipse 2017 @ Your Library

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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NCompass Live: Feelings are Messy: Building Emotional Intelligence in Libraryland

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘Feelings are Messy: Building Emotional Intelligence in Libraryland’, on Wednesday, June 21, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

Emotions are an integral part of the human experience. They give us highly valuable information, but oftentimes we are not aware of how to actually use this information for ourselves or our interactions with others. This workshop will focus on four areas of practice for improving or developing one’s emotional intelligence; self-awareness, self-management, awareness of others, building relationships. Participants will gain tools for self-assessment as well as resources for furthering their quest for emotional intelligence. We all deal with people but how many have learned to first deal with ourselves in order to develop healthy and constructive relationships?

Presenter: Anneka Ramirez, Director, Three Rivers Library System.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • June 28 – The New NLA Intellectual Freedom Manual Comes to the Rescue
  • July 5 – PubMed, PubMed Central, MEDLINE, MedlinePlus…
  • July 12 – From Collections to Commons: How we turned stacks to student spaces at UNL
  • July 19 – Finding Your Focus: Tips for Early Career Success

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Is Your Library the Best Small Library in America?

Calling all libraries serving communities of 25,000 or less! Library Journal is now accepting applications for the Best Small Library in America Award, sponsored by Junior Library Guild. The deadline to nominate your library is July 17.

This is an amazing opportunity to show off your great rural or small library. Anyone can nominate a library – the library administration itself, patrons, members of the community, library peers, etc.

The winning library will receive a $5,000 cash award, a feature story in the September 15, 2017 Library Journal, and online coverage. Two finalist libraries will be awarded $1,000 worth of JLG products and services, and special mention in Library Journal.

Nominate your favorite Nebraska library today! Nomination guidelines and instructions are on the Best Small Library in America Award website.

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NCompass Live: The Purrfect Solution: LibraryThing’s TinyCat for Small Libraries

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘The Purrfect Solution: LibraryThing’s TinyCat for Small Libraries’, on Wednesday, June 14, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

LibraryThing presents TinyCat, its new, mobile-friendly solution for small libraries. TinyCat is a full-fledged OPAC for small libraries, with the look and features of high-priced systems, at a price every school, church and other community organization can afford.

Hundreds of other libraries are calling TinyCat “simple”, “very easy,”, and “a lifesaver!” TinyCat builds on LibraryThing, a long-running and much-beloved social cataloging for book lovers and small organizations. So it’s easy to use for librarians and non-librarians alike.

Come explore everything TinyCat has to offer, from handy search tools and fun sharing options to features for tracking your circulation and patrons.

Presenters: Tim Spalding, Founder and CEO of LibraryThing, and Kristi Kennedy, TinyCat Support Specialist.

About LibraryThing: LibraryThing is a leader in social networking for readers and in software for libraries. LibraryThing.com counts over 2 million members who have cataloged nearly 115 million books. In addition to TinyCat, LibraryThing also offers libraries a suite of catalog enhancements through LibraryThing for Libraries. Learn more at LibraryThing.com and LibraryThing.com/forlibraries.

About TinyCat: TinyCat is the online catalog for tiny libraries. With free 30-day trials, affordable pricing, and online tutorials, adopting your own TinyCat has never been easier. Visit librarycat.org or email tinycat@librarything.com to learn more.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • June 21 – Feelings are Messy: Building Emotional Intelligence in Libraryland
  • June 28 – The New NLA Intellectual Freedom Manual Comes to the Rescue
  • July 5 – PubMed, PubMed Central, MEDLINE, MedlinePlus…
  • July 12 – From Collections to Commons: How we turned stacks to student spaces at UNL
  • July 19 – Finding Your Focus: Tips for Early Career Success

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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2016 Fiscal Year Data is Now Available

The 2016 public library survey data is now available on the NLC website. This is preliminary data (meaning that it has not yet been certified by IMLS) so keep in mind that it might be subject to change. There is also a data dashboard that summarizes the data. Thanks to all of you who submitted your statistics. Historical data (back to 1999) is also available on our website. The next survey cycle begins in November, but you should be collecting those statistics now. If you are a new library director, check out the Bibliostat guide.

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State Aid Letters Have Been Mailed

The 2017 state aid calculations are now complete. State aid letters have been mailed and payments are in process. In the meantime, you can read (in general) about state aid and how it is distributed. Here is a list of the state aid distributions for 2017 (including this year’s formula). Finally, here is a link to a press release you can customize and use for your particular library.

For those libraries that aren’t accredited, now may be the time to consider the accreditation process, as you would then be eligible for state aid next year. You also need to submit your public library survey online via Bibliostat. The accreditation process starts later this summer, and the next public library survey collection cycle begins in November.

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NCompass Live: Collecting Library User Feedback: Free! high tech and low tech options

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘Collecting Library User Feedback: Free! high tech and low tech options that will meet your needs’, on Wednesday, April 26, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

In the context of the growing popularity of digital resources, declining reference and circulation transactions, and falling gate counts, collecting feedback about the unique needs and preferences of twenty-first century library users has never been more pertinent and important. But collecting that data can be expensive, especially for small libraries. This is particularly true in times of shrinking budgets.

Fortunately, there are plenty of free options when it comes to surveying your service population. Depending on your needs, you may choose a high tech option like Google Forms or a low tech option like a white marker board. Paul Meek Library at the University of Tennessee at Martin conducted user satisfaction surveys using both high tech and low tech options in the spring of 2016, the results of which were surprisingly similar.

In this presentation, we will discuss our experience conducting high tech and low tech (but all free!) surveys with an emphasis on the benefits and drawbacks of each to help you decide which option is best for your needs.

Presenters: Adam Clemons, Information Literacy Coordinator and Instruction Librarian; Jim Nance, Reference and Research Educator; Karen White, Outreach Librarian, Paul Meek Library, University of Tennessee at Martin.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • May 3 – UNL Extension – The Learning Child – Co-Parenting for Successful Kids
  • May 17 – Binge Boxes, Boovie Bags, Book box binge, Makerspace Kits and more
  • May 24 – Ad Filters -The Case For and Against Installation on Public Computers

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Register Now for Library and Information Services Classes

Library and Information Services (LIS) class registration is now open at Central Community College for Summer and Fall 2017 classes,  see www.cccneb.edu/library

Classes include:

Summer 2017 – May 22 to July 27

  • Reference Resources and Services, with Marty Magee, Instructor.  This course provides a background on professional competencies, ethical responsibilities, and the reference interview as well as effective use of print and digital resources including databases and websites.

 

Fall 2017 – August 21 to December 15

Foundations of Library and Information Services, with Marty Magee, Instructor. This course provides introductory information in multiple areas including the history of libraries, foundational principles, databases and websites, library technology use, programming, and changing library roles.

Leadership and Management in Library and Information Agencies, with Michael Straatmann, Instructor. This course includes the theories, concepts, and activities integral to leading and managing 21st Century libraries and information agencies.

Library and Information Services Capstone Practicum, with Erica Rose, Instructor. This course is the capstone course, the last in the Library and Information Services curriculum, and includes a review of principle pieces of learning from the LIS program. Students will complete 40 hours of service learning in a host library.

For information concerning Admissions or Registration, contact: Dee Johnson djohnson@cccneb.edu, 402-562-1418 or Toll Free: 877-222-0780.

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E-rate: Form 470 Deadline and Online Resources

Just a reminder …. Thursday, April 13 is the deadline to submit the first form in the E-rate process, Form 470, for the upcoming 2017 Funding Year.

The filing window for submitting the second form in the process, Form 471, opened at noon EST on Monday, February 27, and will close at 11:59 PM EDT on Thursday, May 11. This makes April 13 the deadline to post your Form 470 to the USAC website, meet the 28-day posting requirement for the competitive bidding process, and submit a Form 471 by the filing window closing date.

However, we do not recommend waiting until the last day to submit your Form 470! If there are any issues that day, like the E-rate servers are slowed down because it is the last day to submit, or you can’t submit the form due to reasons on your end, such as illness, weather, power outage, etc., then you would miss the deadline and lose out on E-rate altogether. So, get your E-rate process started and submit your Form 470 as soon as possible!

Do you need help completing your forms? Do you have questions about E-rate? You’re in luck!

USAC has Form 470 resources on their website:

USAC is presenting 2 webinars this week on the E-rate program and the application process for Funding Year 2017. Check the USAC website for details and registration.

And more recorded webinars, demos, and training materials are available on the NLC E-rate webpage.

If you have any questions or need any assistance with your E-rate forms, please contact Christa Porter, 800-307-2665, 402-471-3107.

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NCompass Live: Making Space: Administrative Weeding

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘Making Space: Administrative Weeding’, on Wednesday, April 5, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

Scott Childers, Southeast Library System Director, will discuss weeding for library directors. What should the library director keep out of all the bills, meeting minutes, donor records, summer reading manuals and everything else that accumulates over their tenure?

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • April 12 – Building a Digital Image Collection With Flickr: A low (or no) cost way to share your digital assets
  • April 19 – LMNOP: The Evolution of Engagement
  • April 26 – Collecting Library User Feedback: Free! high tech and low tech options that will meet your needs
  • May 17 – Binge Boxes, Boovie Bags, Book box binge, Makerspace Kits and more

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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E-rate Program Webinars for Beginners

From USAC: Schools and Libraries Program Special Edition News Brief

For any libraries interested in E-rate, we strongly recommend that you attend these webinars to learn more about the program. These sessions will be useful to libraries who are new to E-rate and current E-rate libraries who just want a refresher on what E-rate is all about.

Webinars: E-rate Program Overview for Beginners

E-rate Program applicants are invited to participate in a webinar on the E-rate program and the application process for Funding Year 2017. These webinars are tailored for new E-rate applicants or anyone who needs a refresher on basic program information. During each webinar, the audience will have the opportunity to participate in a live question and answer session with members of the Schools and Libraries team.

Registration for these events is now open and available in the “Upcoming Events” section of the Schools and Libraries Trainings & Outreach page. Register for one or both webinars based on your training needs.


E-rate 101: Introduction to the E-rate Program

Wednesday, April 5, 2017, 12:00-1:00 PM CT

This webinar provides an overview of E-rate Program fundamentals, including key terms, timelines, processes, and the roles of USAC and the FCC. Learn who can apply for funding and what types of services are eligible as well as how to calculate your discounts and Category Two budgets. The presentation is a great option for first-time applicants and anyone who needs a refresher on the basics of the E-rate Program.  Register Now!

E-rate Program Application Process

Thursday, April 6, 2017, 12:00-1:00 PM CT

This webinar provides a detailed overview of the E-rate Program Application Process. We will explain the purpose and process of filing each program form, including your options for invoicing. We will also provide guidance on the requirements for choosing a vendor and what to expect during Program Integrity Assurance (PIA) review. Last, we’ll cover the rules and importance of document retention. The presentation is intended for first-time applicants and anyone who needs a refresher on the basics of the E-rate Program Application Process.  Register Now!


If you can’t attend the live presentations, register for the webinars and we’ll send you a link to the recording. The recordings will also be posted in the Online Learning Library.

Equipment and Set-Up

To participate, you’ll need:

  • Minimum system requirements:
    • Click the “FAQs and System Test” button on the event’s registration page.
  • A computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.
  • Computer speakers or headset.

Need Help?

If you have any questions about the webinar, please contact USAC Outreach at outreach@usac.org.

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MLS Classes Offered in Sioux Falls, SD

Beginning in the Fall of 2017, the School of Library and Information Management (SLIM) at Emporia State University will be offering classes in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The program is  accredited by the American Library Association and offers a two-year, 36-credit-hour Master of Library Science degree that prepares students for careers as information professionals in all types of libraries and information agencies–public, academic, school, corporate, private, government, and special libraries.

Seven core courses are offered in a blended format, with some online coursework  and some face-to-face time with professors. The face-to-face time is accomplished during  weekend intensives, with classes held on Friday nights from 6:00-9:00 p.m.  and  Saturdays from 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Each core course requires two face-to-face weekends per semester. Most electives are in online format. Face-to-face classes will be held at Augustana University or Siouxland Libraries. Apply by July 1, 2017. For more information, contact Kathie Buckman at kbuckman@emporia.edu or 620-341-5065 or see https://www.emporia.edu/news/03/15/2017/get-your-mls-in-south-dakota/?

 

 

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Posted in Education & Training, Library Management, Now hiring @ your library | Leave a comment