Friday Reads: I Am Gandhi: A Graphic Biography of a Hero by Brad Meltzer

As graphic novels have gained popularity and recognition as legitimate reading, authors and illustrators continue to expand into other areas.  Although nonfiction told in graphic novel format has been around for quite some time, it seems in recent years more opportunities have been taken.  Well-known nonfiction writer, Brad Meltzer, has created a slim volume the publisher is calling a graphic biography.

I Am Gandhi is illustrated by 25 artists, with the variety of art strengthening this excellent biography of an outstanding man.  Meltzer tells of his childhood in India, his time spent in London and South Africa, and mentions a particular picture book that influenced his life.  It is written as if Gandhi himself is telling of his life to a small group of children.  How he developed his non-violent approach, what existing ideas influenced him in its development, and how he and others put it into practice are all included.

This title is a good introduction to Gandhi, his life and beliefs.  It may guide readers to look for more in-depth information about him.  The timeline, quotes, and photos at the back of the book add to his story.

Librarians may see the title and author and think of his series of biographies for much younger readers, also titled “Ordinary People Change the World.”  This younger series is aimed at kindergarten through grade 3 and gives a much briefer look at a number of amazing people.

Meltzer, Brad. I Am Gandhi: A Graphic Biography of a Hero. , 2018. Print.
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Treasurer Stenberg, Library Commission Announce 5th annual Read to Win $529 Drawing in Nebraska Libraries

Fifteen Readers to Each Receive $529 NEST Accounts in Random Drawing

Kearney, Neb. (May 24, 2018) – Summer readers at participating Nebraska libraries will have an opportunity to win a $529 college savings account from the Nebraska Educational Savings Trust (NEST 529) in the Read to Win $529 Drawing, Nebraska State Treasurer Don Stenberg said today.

Stenberg, who is Trustee of NEST, announced the fifth annual Read to Win $529 drawing at a news conference at the Kearney Public Library during the library’s summer reading kickoff. With Stenberg to announce the drawing was Sally Snyder, Coordinator of Children and Young Adult Library Services at the Nebraska Library Commission.

Stenberg encouraged all Nebraska libraries to participate. Information is available on the Nebraska Library Commission website at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/youth/summerreading/scholarshipdrawing.aspx.

Matthew Williams, Director of the Kearney library, and Shawntel Daniell, Universal Banker with First National Bank, Main Bank, Kearney, also spoke.

Fifteen summer readers between the ages of 3 and 18 will be selected in a random drawing to win a $529 contribution each to a NEST 529 College Savings account. Five winners will be selected from each of Nebraska’s three congressional districts. Children and teens may participate in the Read to Win $529 drawing, provided they have completed their local libraries’ requirements for the summer reading program and have registered through their local libraries before August 22.

Winners will be announced in late September and recognized in a ceremony at the Capitol in October. More than 13,000 were entered in last year’s drawing. Each winner’s library branch will receive $250 from NEST.

“We are happy to announce the fifth annual NEST Read to Win $529 drawing, and we want to encourage children and teens to participate. It’s easy to sign up, and you might just be one of the lucky winners,” Stenberg said.

“We know children and teens have enjoyed summer reading programs at their local libraries for years without monetary incentives. The NEST 529 Read to Win drawing is an ideal opportunity to emphasize the connection between reading and learning and to help young readers plan for higher education. Maybe we will plant a seed for their future educational endeavors and a greater awareness of the benefits of saving through our Nebraska Educational Savings Trust,” Stenberg said.

“Reading is a passion of mine; every chance I get, I am reading a book,” said Shawntel Daniell from First National. “The ability to help students and their families save for their educational futures with opportunities such as the NEST Read to Win scholarship is something all of us at First National Bank are passionate about.”

Nebraska Library Commission Director Rod Wagner, who could not attend the news conference, issued the following statement: “NEST Read to Win $529 is an excellent incentive for Nebraska Summer Reading Program participants and a great way to bring awareness to Nebraska’s 529 College Savings Plans. Young readers become lifelong learners and will benefit from college savings plans when they advance to higher education.

“Nebraska public libraries’ summer reading programs are great opportunities for children and teens to take time to enjoy reading while maintaining and improving reading skills. They can also enjoy the activities that are part of this summer’s Libraries Rock program. We thank State Treasurer Stenberg and First National Bank for the college savings drawing for Nebraska Summer Reading Program participants.”

For scholarship contest rules, visit www.NEST529.com and click on Grow. Select Scholarships & Rewards. Contest rules also are available at https://treasurer.nebraska.gov/csp/scholarships.

For more information on the Nebraska Summer Reading Program visit the Nebraska Library Commission’s website at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/youth/summerreading/ or contact a local library.

To find out more about NEST College Savings Plans, visit www.NEST529.com or treasurer.nebraska.gov.

About Nebraska Library Commission

 As Nebraska’s state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services—bringing together people and information.

About NEST

NEST is a tax-advantaged 529 college savings plan and provides four plans to help make saving for college simple and affordable: NEST Direct College Savings Plan, the NEST Advisor College Savings Plan, the TD Ameritrade 529 College Savings Plan, and the State Farm College Savings Plan. The Nebraska State Treasurer serves as Program Trustee. First National Bank of Omaha serves as Program Manager, and all investments are approved by the Nebraska Investment Council. Families nationwide are saving for college using Nebraska’s 529 College Savings Plans, which have more than 254,000 accounts, including 80,000 in Nebraska. Visit NEST529.com and treasurer.nebraska.gov for more information.

About First National Bank of Omaha

First National Bank of Omaha is a subsidiary of First National of Nebraska. First National of Nebraska and its affiliates have more than $21 billion in assets and 5,000 employee associates. Primary banking offices are located in Nebraska, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, South Dakota and Texas.

Investments Are Not FDIC Insured* · No Bank, State or Federal Guarantee · May Lose Value
*Except the Bank Savings Individual Investment Option

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speakers at the news conference gather after the event. From left, Shawntel Daniell, First National Bank; Sally Snyder, Nebraska Library Commission; Treasurer Stenberg; and Matthew Williams, Kearney Public Library Director.

 

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Basic Skills: Introduction to Cataloging Self-Paced Module

Did you miss out on the Organization of Materials Basic Skills class in April? Do you still need this class to complete your Basic Skills requirement? Here’s another chance!

Due to the number of students interested in this class and the Nebraska Library Commission’s ongoing evaluation of the Basic Skills classes as a whole, we have decided to open a second self-paced section of the course with a shiny new name. Introduction to Cataloging!

As this is a new self-paced format, we are limiting enrollment to 35 students. The content of the class will not be greatly different from previous Organization of Materials classes, but this new module will be self-paced, instead of the instructor-led format that you may be familiar with from other Basic Skills classes.

Registration and more details can be found on the NLC Library Training & Events Calendar:

If you have any questions, please contact Holli Duggan, Continuing Education Coordinator.

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NCompass Live: Library Innovation Studios – A Project Update and Review of the Application Process

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘Library Innovation Studios – A Project Update and Review of the Application Process’, on Wednesday, May 30, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

Project staff and partners for the Library Innovation Studios: Transforming Rural Communities project will provide an update to the project, a review of the benefits and commitments involving a makerspace, the need for local partners, and details about the final application/selection process. Eligible Nebraska public libraries are those with a legal service area of less than 25,000 and are accredited. The deadline for the second application cycle – that will identify the final thirteen participating libraries – is scheduled for July 20, 2018.

During the webinar you’ll also hear from Heather St. Clair and Audrey Heil (the directors from the Ashland and Loup City public libraries) who will discuss their experiences preparing for and hosting a Library Innovation Studio for up 20 weeks.

The Nebraska Library Commission (NLC) along with partners University of Nebraska – Lincoln, Nebraska Innovation Studio, Nebraska Extension, and Regional Library Systems, are excited about the project, which was awarded a National Leadership Grant of $530,732 by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). The project began July 1, 2017 and will conclude the summer of 2020.

The project uses Library Innovation Studios (makerspaces) hosted by libraries to support community engagement and participatory learning experiences by providing access to technological and innovative learning tools not readily accessible locally. This strengthening of the maker culture is expected to stimulate creativity, innovation and the exchange of ideas to facilitate entrepreneurship, skills development, and local economic development.

Project and application details can be found at: http://nlc.nebraska.gov/grants/InnovationStudios/

Presenters: JoAnn McManus, Library Innovation Studios Project Manager; Mary Jo Ryan, NLC Communications Coordinator; Max Wheeler, Instructional Designer for Library Innovation Studios; Connie Hancock, Community Vitality Extension Educator, UNL; Heather St.Clair, Library Director, Ashland Public Library; and Audrey Heil, Director, Loup City Public Library.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • June 20 – Rising to the Challenge: Using the Aspen Institute Report and Action Guide for Strategic Planning
  • June 27 – The 2018 Public Library Accreditation Process
  • July 18 – Many Languages, Many Cultures: Responding to Diverse Health Information Needs
  • August 1 – Engaging Your Community
  • Aug. 15 – Some of Our Favorites: The System Directors Talk Books

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: I’ll Be Gone in the Dark by Michelle McNamara

Sometimes a book in your read-me-next list jumps to the front of the pack. I read the news reports like everyone else, a month ago, April 25, 2018—the Golden State Killer had finally been arrested. Over thirty years since his last likely murder, authorities arrested a suspect, 72-year-old Sacramento resident Joseph James DeAngelo, a former police officer, based on DNA evidence. I thought to myself: it’s time to read that book by Michelle McNamara, before I read anything else.

I’ll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman’s Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer chronicles McNamara’s tireless research into the then-cold case of the serial killer (and rapist and burglar) that she dubbed the Golden State Killer, a moniker now solidified by recent media attention. While I’m not a true-crime buff, I am a lover of research and storytelling and problem-solving, and McNamara’s journey is thoughtfully told, somehow incredibly informative without ever being lurid or sensational. She never exploits or re-victimizes the people who had the misfortune to experience the mystifying, seemingly random violence of the Golden State Killer. The events in the book are not detailed chronologically from the Killer’s perspective, either, which would be more expected. This structure of the presentation of events seems to de-center and deflate the Killer, which is poetic, considering his need for control. Truly, this book is not really about him.

We read about his crimes in different geographic areas of law enforcement, between 1974 and 1986, and how different agencies put together that the crimes in their area might be committed by one offender. And then, occurring much later, we read how investigators realized how all these offenders (the East Area Rapist, the Original Night Stalker, the Visalia Ransacker, etc.) might be one extremely prolific criminal, that we now know as the Golden State Killer. McNamara details the protocols of investigations, and how they were changing, especially related to DNA collection and testing. She also did copious research herself, and interviews other researchers, amateur and professional, for a fascinating look into the minds of those who try to solve crimes.

McNamara died before she could complete the book. I didn’t know much about her or her writing career before she died. I was familiar with the work of her husband, Patton Oswalt, having enjoyed reading his books and watching his stand-up routines. McNamara was well-known in true crime circles for her blog TrueCrimeDiary, which focused on—you guessed it—true crime and cold cases, an interest she had ever since the unsolved murder of a teenager in her neighborhood as a child. When she died unexpectedly in 2016, McNamara had mostly completed the book, and had written many articles about the case and made extensive notes. The book was completed, faithful to its original intent, by a true crime writer she had worked with previously (Paul Haynes) and Oswalt. The editors have made it very clear what was written by her, what was transcribed from her notes and recordings, what was adapted from her published articles, and so on.

The book was released in February 2018, and it was the story of its posthumous publication that attracted me to it at first. Then HBO purchased the rights, and I was even more interested. And you already know what happened on April 25, 2018.

The title sounds like an odd choice, but when you read the chapter it comes from—a letter McNamara wrote to the Killer, about his eventual capture that she was certain would occur, written long before April 25,, 2018—you’ll understand why it was chosen for the title.

Of interest to library workers: using WorldCat as a research tool, on p 269, in a chapter called “The One.” In this engrossing chapter, we read about the “one” suspect on which various investigators each fixated, how they were each sure they had finally figured out who their suspect was, and then how all the different “ones” were ruled out. (Sidney, Nebraska is also mentioned on p 269—but don’t worry, just read the chapter.)

Also of interest to Nebraskans: the epigraph is a poem by Weldon Kees, “Crime Club.” It helps set an eerie tone for a book as much about the people solving a crime as it is about crime or a criminal. Sure, after you finish the book, you’ll probably want to dive into the news reports about Joseph James DeAngelo. (There’s plenty to read about him already, and more will come out when we get closer to a trial.)

But you might also take a little time to appreciate Weldon Kees. And look into the mystery of his disappearance, if you choose. Or just enjoy some of his poetry.

McNamara, Michelle. I’ll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman’s Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer. , 2018. Print.
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#BookFaceFriday “The Sky Always Hears Me”

This week’s #BookFaceFriday has us dreaming of blue skies, as far as the eye can see.

“The more one knows, the less one believes”- New Chopstix, Lincoln

This week’s #BookFace selection is all about growing up in a small town & fortune cookie wisdom. I like to think it’s about my own small town, where nothing especially exciting ever happens and yet somehow, high school is still full of drama. Just like Central Nowhere, the setting of this week’s selection, by Nebraska author Kirstin Cronn-Mills, “The Sky Always Hears Me: And the Hills Don’t Mind” (Flux, 2009). The perfect coming of age YA novel for a summer book club read. And since this book is in our NLC Book Club Kit collection, it should definitely be on your TBR list!

Written with candor and splashes of humor…this provocative story captures the essence of adolescent ennui and uncertainty through an uncensored first-person narrative. Stubborn, quick-witted and determined to make her dreams come true, Morgan will draw sympathy from readers.“–Publishers Weekly

Love this #BookFace & reading? We suggest checking out all the titles available for book clubs at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/ref/bookclub. Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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Past Legislators

Thomas WolfeWith the 2018 Primary Elections being held last week I thought it would be a good time to highlight a few former legislators whose photos are included in Nebraska Memories. When Nebraska became a state in 1867 it had both a Senate and House of Representatives. The four men whose photos appear in Nebraska Memories were all members of Nebraska’s House of Representatives.

Thomas Wolfe (1877-1879)

Thomas Wolfe was born  Madessa, Lionel and Thomas Wolfe, Jr.in Germany in 1847. His family moved to Wisconsin shortly after his birth. He worked at a variety of newspapers including the Tribune in Chicago, the Evening Thomas Jr. and Madessa WolfePost in New York, the Republican and the Bee in Omaha, and the Nebraska Reporter in Seward. In 1877 became president of the Butler County bank in David City.

Thomas Wolfe was a member of the Nebraska House of Representatives from 1877 to 1879 representing Seward County. Thomas also served as the president of the Nebraska Press Association from 1879-1880. Thomas and his wife Madessa had three children Leonel, Thomas Jr. and Medessa.

Matt Miller (1885-1889)

Matt MillerMat Miller was born in Scotland in 1850. He immigrated with his family to Wisconsin when he was two years old. Both of his parents died when he was eight leaving him and his three siblings as orphans. At the page of 14, Matt ran away an Matt Millerd enlisted in the Union Army. He was discharged in 1866 and after completing high school and graduating commercial college, he moved to Burt County Nebraska.

In 1879, Matt and his first wife Sarah moved to Schuyler and a year later Matt was admitted to the bar. In 1881, he moved to David City and practiced law in town for 42 years. Matt was elected to the House of Representatives and served from 1885 to 1889. Matt also went on to serve as judge for District 5 in Nebraska from 1891-1892.

Michael Delaney (1889-1891 & 1895-1897)

 Michael Delaney and familyMichael Delaney was born in 1843 in New York. When he was two, his parents moved to Wisconsin. He later moved to Iowa where he was a teacher and a farmer. In 1872, he purchased a farm in Butler County Nebraska. In addition to serving as a member of the House or Representatives from 1889-1891 and 1895-1897 Michael held numerous other positions. Some of the positions he held included county superintendent of schools, school director for his district, a member of the Board of Supervisors and Justice of the Peace. Michael and his wife Katherine had seven children.

Henry C. Richmond (1915-1917)

Henry C. Richmond was born in 1870 in Missouri. As a child, his family moved to Kansas and later to Webster County Nebraska. Henry worked at a number of newspapers Henry Richmondincluding the Red Cloud Chief, Omaha World-Herald, and the Fremont Daily Herald. In 1907, he was elected president of the Nebraska Press Association. In 1911 and again in 1913 Henry was elected chief clerk of the Nebraska House of Representatives.

Henry Richmond served as a member of the House of Representatives from 1915-1917 representing Douglas County. Following his term in 1917, he became the secretary for the Nebraska State Council of Defense. Henry passed away in May 1945 in Portland Oregon. According to his obituary, he and his wife Jeannette had two daughters and three grandchildren.

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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‘Choose Your Days’ by Paula Wallace to Represent Nebraska at National Book Festival

A children’s picture book that encourages us all to remember that we hold the key to our days will represent Nebraska at the 2018 National Book Festival. The Nebraska Center for the Book selected Choose Your Days by Paula Wallace (Cinco Puntos Press, 2016) as the state’s selection for the National Book Festival’s “Discover Great Places through Reading” brochure and map. Each state selects one book about the state, or by an author from the state, that is a good read for children or young adults. The brochure and map will be distributed at the September 1 Festival in Washington DC and will be featured in the “Great Reads about Great Places” links on the websites of both the national and Nebraska centers for the book.

This book, written and illustrated by Omaha artist Paula Wallace, tells an engaging story of a child learning to live her dreams to the fullest. The bright and whimsical illustrations sweep the reader along through the story and help deliver a powerful message about love and loss. Nebraska’s “Great Reads about Great Places” book is chosen from the previous year’s Nebraska Book Award winners and this book was awarded the 2017 Nebraska Book Award in the Children’s Picture Book category. Entries for the 2018 Nebraska Book Awards will be accepted until June 30—see http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/awards/nebookawards.html.

The National Book Festival will feature presentations by award-winning authors, poets, and illustrators at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC. Festival attendees can meet their favorite authors, get books signed, have photos taken with mascots and storybook characters, and participate in a variety of learning activities. States will staff exhibit booths to promote reading, library programs, and literary events. Find out more about the 2018 National Book Festival (including a list of featured authors) at http://www.loc.gov/bookfest.

The Nebraska Center for the Book is housed at the Nebraska Library Commission and brings together the state’s readers, writers, booksellers, librarians, publishers, printers, educators, and scholars to build the community of the book, supporting programs to celebrate and stimulate public interest in books, reading, and the written word. The Nebraska Center for the Book is supported by the Nebraska Library Commission.

As the state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services, bringing together people and information.
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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.

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Throwback Thursday: United States Liberty Bell Train

Happy #ThrowbackThursday from Nebraska Memories.

With Memorial Day just around the corner, we thought this photograph would be a good way to start the weekend. This 5 X 7, black and white photograph, is a shot of the Liberty Bell on tour through the United States. The photo depicts the bell on a railroad car flanked by two American flags with several military personnel and officials around it. It also shows the crowd of onlookers that came to see the bell. The train stopped in McCook, in July, 1909. The Liberty Bell crossed the country on a number of train journeys to be displayed at special events. This ended in the 1930s when it was determined to be too unsafe to move the bell from place to place.

This photograph was provided and is owned by the High Plains Historical Society. The High Plains Historical Society and Museum and the McCook Public Library worked in partnership to digitize photographic images from the historical society’s collection. These images document early growth of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad in McCook, Nebraska, and the surrounding area. The collection spans a time period from the early 1880s through the 1960s.

Interested in Nebraska history? Find out more about this photo in the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Save the Date for Fall Book Celebrations

Nebraska books and writers will be featured and celebrated at two events in Lincoln, so save the dates for the Nebraska Book Festival on August 25, 2018 and Celebration of Nebraska Books on October 27, 2018. These two events will highlight work by Nebraska writers and publishers, featuring stories and poetry set in Nebraska.

The August 25 Nebraska Book Festival will be held at the University of Nebraska City Campus Union from 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. It will feature author appearances, book signings, exhibitors, booksellers, poetry readings, and hands-on family activities. Authors include Janice Harrington, Stew Magnuson, Brandon Vogel, Melissa Fraterrigo, Jeff Kurrus, and Michael Forsberg. An opening reception on Friday evening and a closing reception on Sunday afternoon will be held at the Center for Great Plains Studies to highlight new Nebraska books. The Festival is sponsored by University of Nebraska Press, Nebraska Library Commission, Nebraska Center for the Book, Lincoln City Libraries, Humanities Nebraska, Union Bank, University of Nebraska-Lincoln College of Journalism & Mass Communications, Friends of University of Nebraska Press, Nebraska Writers Guild, and Concierge Marketing and Publishing Services. More information about the Festival is available at http://bookfestival.nebraska.gov/2018/index.aspx.

The October 27 Celebration of Nebraska Books will be held at the Nebraska History Museum, 131 Centennial Mall North. The winners of the 2018 Nebraska Book Awards—Nebraska’s prestigious awards for literacy, writing, and publishing—will read from their winning books and sign copies of the books. Nominate books for the Nebraska Book Awards at http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/awards/nebookawards.html. The Celebration will also feature poetry readings in honor of the 2018 One Book One Nebraska book selection, Nebraska Presence: An Anthology of Poetry (The Backwaters Press, 2007) edited by Greg Kosmicki and Mary K. Stillwell.

Awards will be presented to supporters of Nebraska writing. The Mildred Bennett Award will recognize an individual who has made a significant contribution to fostering the literary tradition in Nebraska, reminding us of the literary and intellectual traditions that enrich our lives and mold our world. The Jane Geske Award will be presented to a Nebraska organization for exceptional contribution to literacy, books, reading, libraries, or literature in Nebraska. It commemorates Geske’s passion for books, and was established in recognition of her contributions to the well-being of Nebraska libraries. Nomination forms are available at http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/nominationforms.html.

The Nebraska Cen­ter for the Book An­nual Meeting will be held at 1:30 p.m.—just prior to the Celebration of Nebraska Books. An Awards Reception honoring the winners, book signings, and announcement of the 2019 One Book One Nebraska book choice will conclude the festivities. The 2018 Celebration of Nebraska Books is sponsored by the Nebraska Center for the Book (NCB), Nebraska Library Commis­sion, and History Nebraska—with Humanities Nebraska supporting the One Book One Nebraska presentation. For more information see http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/programs/celebration.html and https://www.facebook.com/NebraskaCenterfortheBook.

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NCompass Live: Big-Time Library Support in Small Towns

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘Big-Time Library Support in Small Towns’, on Wednesday, May 23, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

With examples from my newly released novel, To the Stars Through Difficulties, this session will highlight efforts in small towns to support libraries, a century ago and today. The novel was inspired by the 59 Carnegie libraries in Kansas, has won generous reviews from Booklist, Library Review Journal, and United for Libraries, as well gold medal IPPY and Readers’ Favorites awards. It was just listed as a finalist in the INDIES Foreword awards. My own background is in small town arts council development, with work first in Kansas and then for the National Endowment for the Arts in the Midwest and the Pacific Rim.

Presenter: Romalyn Tilghman, She Writes Press.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • May 30 – Library Innovation Studios – A Project Update and Review of the Application Process
  • June 20 – Rising to the Challenge: Using the Aspen Institute Report and Action Guide for Strategic Planning
  • June 27 – The 2018 Public Library Accreditation Process
  • July 18 – Many Languages, Many Cultures: Responding to Diverse Health Information Needs
  • August 1 – Engaging Your Community
  • Aug. 15 – Some of Our Favorites: The System Directors Talk Books

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: Moon by Alison Oliver

Moon is overwhelmed with homework, music lessons, soccer practice, chores, and stuff. Every single day is the same.

But she wonders how it could be if she just didn’t have to do these things.

Following a shooting star and some paw prints into the forest, Moon meets a wolf who, along with his pack, shows her their “wolfy ways” – how to play, how to be still, and how to be wild.

Moon, written and illustrated by Alison Oliver (2018), is a sweet story with beautiful, expressive pictures about balancing the day-to-day busy schedules with time spent outside, playing and connecting.

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#BookFaceFriday “The Language of Flowers”

Those April showers have finally brought us some May flowers in this week’s #BookFaceFriday!

We’ve got spring fever this week at the NLC, so we thought this flowery #BookFace would be just perfect. I can practically smell the lilacs in this picture from my desk. This week’s selection isThe Language of Flowers” by Vanessa Diffenbaugh (Ballantine Books, 2012) would be a great choice for your next read. This book is a part of our NLC Book Club Kit collection, put this New York Times bestseller on your to read list today!

A captivating novel in which a single sprig of rosemary speaks louder than words . . . The Language of Flowers deftly weaves the sweetness of newfound love with the heartache of past mistakes. . . . [It] will certainly change how you choose your next bouquet.”—Minneapolis Star Tribune

This week’s #BookFace model is the adorable Margot!

Love this #BookFace & reading? We suggest checking out all the titles available for book clubs at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/ref/bookclub. Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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Summer 2017 State Publications List Available

For those wanting to add records to their catalogs for Nebraska state documents, the Summer 2017 list of Nebraska E-Docs is now available at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/govDocs/ShippingLists/edocsalerts.aspx.

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Throwback Thursday: Florence School Bus

Happy #ThrowbackThursday from Nebraska Memories.

As children all over Nebraska are finishing up the school year we thought this throwback to 1931 was perfect. School buses have changed a little in the last 87 years.

This photograph was taken in front of the old Florence Elementary School at 8516 N. 31st Street by Dorothy Edwards, a teacher at the school. The Florence School bus was owned and driven by Sam Smith, shown standing just inside the door at the front of the wagon. The boy in the center carrying a book is Sammy Smith Jr., son of the driver. The tall boy on the far right, also carrying a book, is Billy Gale. His sister, Vivian Gale (Gast) is the curly-haired girl in the back row. Mrs. Gast stated that she and her brother had red hair. Mrs. Gast also stated the bus was painted a dark green with red trim; the door was yellow. The street where this picture was taken is still unpaved. The old Florence school was closed and torn down in the mid 1960s. It was replaced by the current Florence Elementary on N. 36th Street.

Historical materials relating directly to the Omaha Public Schools have been located in various departments and school buildings. Many schools still maintain their own collections. In 2003, staff from the Educational Research Library / Library Services received a small grant to begin collecting and organizing these materials in a central location. This group of pictures and their accompanying stories is but a tiny part of the District’s over 150 year history.

Interested in Nebraska history? Find out more about this photo in the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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2018 State Aid Letters Have Been Mailed

The 2018 state aid calculations are now complete. State aid letters have been mailed and payments are in process. In the meantime, you can read (in general) about state aid and how it is distributed. Here is a list of the state aid distributions for 2018 (including this year’s formula). Finally, here is a link to a press release you can customize and use for your particular library.

Here is also a list of the libraries that will be receiving Dollar$ for Data payments. For those libraries, you are now eligible to apply for accreditation when the cycle opens this summer.

For libraries that aren’t accredited, now may be the time to consider the accreditation process, as you would then be eligible for state aid next year. You also need to submit your public library survey online via Bibliostat. The next public library survey collection cycle begins in November.

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Librarians and Teachers to Host Letter Writing Clinics

What could motivate Nebraska young people to write letters? A great story and the opportunity to tell an author about how a book made a difference in their own life can provide just the right encouragement. Teachers and librarians in Nebraska were recently awarded grants to host pilot Letter Writing Clinics for students in their area. The clinics will introduce students to the Letters About Literature contest and letter writing techniques. Students will get ideas for selecting books and learn how to craft letters that can be submitted to the Letters About Literature contest, a national reading and writing promotion program that engages nearly 50,000 adolescent and young readers nationwide in grades four through twelve. The competition encourages young people to read, be inspired, and write back to the author (living or dead) who had an impact on their lives.

The Letter Writing Clinic grants are sponsored by Humanities Nebraska, Nebraska Center for the Book, Nebraska Cultural Endowment, and Nebraska Library Commission. The winning applicants are:

  • Sarah Alfred, Morrill Public Library Director, Friends of Morrill Public Library
  • Keri Anderson, Hoesch Memorial Library Director, Alma
  • Becky Henkel, Bayard Public Library Director
  • Alicia Lassen, Overton Public School Librarian and Teacher

The annual Letters About Literature writing competition is sponsored nationally by the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress, with funding from Dollar General Literacy Foundation. The Center for the Book was established in 1977 as a public-private partnership to use the resources of the Library of Congress to stimulate public interest in books and reading. The Nebraska competition is coordinated and sponsored by the Nebraska Center for the Book, Nebraska Library Commission, Houchen Bindery Ltd., and Chapters Bookstore in Seward.

For more information about the Letters About Literature competition, see http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/programs/LAL.html. To learn more about Letter Writing Clinics, see http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/programs/LAL_Grant/2018/index.aspx.

The Nebraska Center for the Book is housed at the Nebraska Library Commission and brings together the state’s readers, writers, booksellers, librarians, publishers, printers, educators, and scholars to build the community of the book—supporting programs to celebrate and stimulate public interest in books, reading, and the written word. The Nebraska Center for the Book is supported by the Nebraska Library Commission. As the state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services—bringing together people and information.

Humanities Nebraska inspires and enriches personal and public life by offering opportunities to thoughtfully engage with history and culture. Humanities Nebraska was established as a state-based affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities in 1973.

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.

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NCompass Live: 2018 One Book One Nebraska: “Nebraska Presence: An Anthology of Poetry”

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘2018 One Book One Nebraska: Nebraska Presence: An Anthology of Poetry‘, on Wednesday, May 16, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

In this fourteenth year of One Book One Nebraska, Nebraska libraries and other literary and cultural organizations continue to plan activities and events to encourage all Nebraskans to read and discuss the same book. Join us to hear more about this statewide reading promotion activity, sponsored by the Nebraska Center for the Book, Humanities Nebraska, The Backwaters Press, and the Nebraska Library Commission.

We are very pleased to announce that our featured guests will be Greg Kosmicki and Mary K. Stillwell, editors of the 2018 selection, Nebraska Presence: An Anthology of Poetry.

Join Nebraska Library Commission Director Rod Wagner, Nebraska Library Commission Communication Coordinator Mary Jo Ryan, and Molly Fisher, Commissioner and Nebraska Center for the Book Board Member, to:

  • Learn about how to create a successful local reading promotion using Nebraska’s year-long, statewide celebration featuring Nebraska Presence: An Anthology of Poetry, Edited by Greg Kosmicki & Mary K. Stillwell.
  • Brainstorm strategies to read and discuss Nebraska Presence: An Anthology of Poetry, a collection of poems by more than 80 contemporary Nebraska poets, including Pulitzer Prize winner and former Poet Laureate of the United States, Ted Kooser, Nebraska State Poet Twyla Hansen, former State Poet William Kloefkorn, and many others.
  • Find tools to help engage your community in local activities to encourage them to come together through literature to explore this work in community-wide reading programs.
  • Learn about the Celebration of Nebraska Books, set for October 27, which will celebrate this book, along with the winners of the 2018 Nebraska Book Awards.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • May 23 – Big-Time Library Support in Small Towns
  • May 30 – Library Innovation Studios – A Project Update and Review of the Application Process
  • June 20 – Rising to the Challenge: Using the Aspen Institute Report and Action Guide for Strategic Planning
  • July 18 – Many Languages, Many Cultures: Responding to Diverse Health Information Needs
  • August 1 – Engaging Your Community

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training, Nebraska Center for the Book | 1 Comment

#BookFaceFriday “The Quality of Courage”

Hey, batter batter! It’s #BookFaceFriday!

Buy us some peanuts and Cracker Jack, with this #BookFace, we don’t care if we ever come back. This week’s selection is a collection of short stories, from a squad leader’s reactions under machine-gun fire to a small boy overcoming his fear of the barber’s chair. Mickey Mantle’sThe Quality of Courage: True Stories of Heroism and Bravery” (Bantam, 1965) would be a great choice for your next read. This book is a part of our NLC Book Club Kit collection, reserve this collection of short stories for your book club today!

I want to sell you on something I respect and admire more than any single thing… courage. Courage will get you further than brains, money or athletic skill, and I’ll tell you why…” —Mickey Mantle

This week’s #BookFace model is Bruce Oorlog, NLC’s Mail/Material Specialist and avid baseball fan!

Love this #BookFace & reading? We suggest checking out all the titles available for book clubs at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/ref/bookclub. Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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Friday Reads; The Woman in Cabin 10, by Ruth Ware

In Ruth Ware’s The Woman in Cabin 10, it’s the old set up on a cruise ship, there’s a lady in a cabin, but she isn’t really there. There were sounds of a struggle, and a body hitting the water, a smear of some substance on a privacy screen like blood, but in the morning, nothing. The night before there had been suitcases, and clothing in the cabin. In the morning it is completely bare

The Woman in Cabin 10

Lo (Laura) Blacklock wouldn’t have heard the sounds from the cabin next door, except, within days of the trip, her flat in London was broken into while she slept. The burglar actually locked her in her bedroom while he burgled her flat. She’s gone through the trouble of replacing her phone, money and credit cards, but the break in has deeply disturbed her. To top it all off, she’s had a fight with her boyfriend, a photojournalist just back from a foreign shoot. She’s sleep deprived. anxious, and now, can’t find the mysterious young woman, approximately her age, who she borrowed mascara from in cabin 10 next door. Worse, none of the crew or passengers are missing.

But this time, the cruise ship, the cruise, and the passengers are all rather unique. It’s a very, very small, very exclusive cruise ship, more like a large yacht. Fitted out sumptuously, with guests to both fit the setting, and to advertise it–a few of the rich, the owner and his dying wife, travel journalists, a renowned photographer, all to advertise the maiden voyage of the Aurora Borealis, as it sets off from London to sight see the fjords of Norway, cities of the cold northern waters, as well as watch the Northern Lights. And Lo has gotten the chance of a lifetime to go, instead of the owner/head writer of the travel magazine she works for.

On top of the regular narrative are inset emails and online conversations from family and friends unable to contact Lo, foreshadowing a darker, more personal fate for Lo. It all works together to come to an altogether unexpected series of twists. The book is definitely a page turner, as Lo gets herself into trouble taking us right with her.

The Woman in Cabin 10, a novel, by Ruth Ware, Scout Press, imprint of Simon & Schuster, Inc., hardcover 9781501132933, softcopy 9781501132957, e-book 9781501132940

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