Nebraska Presence: An Anthology of Poetry Chosen as 2018 One Book One Nebraska

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
October 23, 2017

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Mary Jo Ryan
402-471-3434
800-307-2665

Nebraska Presence: An Anthology of Poetry Chosen as 2018 One Book One Nebraska   

People across Nebraska are encouraged to read the work of Nebraska poets in 2018—and then talk about the poems with their friends and neighbors. Nebraska Presence: An Anthology of Poetry (The Backwaters Press, 2007) edited by Greg Kosmicki and Mary K. Stillwell was selected as the 2018 One Book One Nebraska at the Nebraska Center for the Book’s Celebration of Nebraska Books on October 21.

Poems by more than eighty contemporary Nebraska poets are featured in the collection. This includes Pulitzer Prize winner and former Poet Laureate of the United States Ted Kooser, Nebraska State Poet Twyla Hansen, former State Poet William Kloefkorn, several poets who have had their poems read on Garrison Keillor’s Writer’s Almanac (Greg Kuzma, Marjorie Saiser, Grace Bauer, and Greg Kosmicki), and widely noted poets Hilda Raz, Roy Scheele, Steve Langan, and many others.

Libraries across Nebraska will join other literary and cultural organizations in planning book discussions, activities, and events that will encourage Nebraskans to read and discuss this book. Support materials to assist with local reading/discussion activities will be available after January 1, 2018 at http://onebook.nebraska.gov. Updates and activity listings will be posted on the One Book One Nebraska Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/onebookonenebraska.

2018 will mark the fourteenth year of the One Book One Nebraska reading program, sponsored by the Nebraska Center for the Book. It encourages Nebraskans across the state to read and discuss one book, chosen from books written by Nebraska authors or that have a Nebraska theme or setting.

One Book One Nebraska is sponsored by Nebraska Center for the Book, Humanities Nebraska, and Nebraska Library Commission. The Nebraska Center for the Book brings together the state’s readers, writers, booksellers, librarians, publishers, printers, educators, and scholars to build the community of the book, supporting programs to celebrate and stimulate public interest in books, reading, and the written word. The Nebraska Center for the Book is housed at and supported by the Nebraska Library Commission.

As the state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services, “bringing together people and information.”

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.

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Young Nebraskans Win Scholarships through their Library Summer Reading Program

Nebraska’s young readers had a great time at the 2017 Summer Reading Programs in libraries across the state and some of them won a $529. Nebraska State Treasurer Don Stenberg, First National Bank of Omaha, and the Nebraska Library Commission presented 15 Nebraska children and teenagers each with a $529 contribution to a NEST 529 College Savings account in the fourth annual Read to Win Drawing at the Nebraska State Capitol Rotunda. Each winner’s respective library branch was awarded $250. For more information see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases/1710winners.nest529.aspx.

PHOTO CAPTION: Nebraska Treasurer Don Stenberg  with Joanna Swanson of First National Bank of Omaha and Rod Wagner, director of the Nebraska Library Commission, and some of the winners of the Read to Win summer reading program. From left, back row, Caine Genereux of Bartlett, Braden Anderson of Hallam and Brayden Reinboth of Lincoln. Center row, Emery Palser of Ravenna, Boaz Roan of Grand Island and Ruth Mansour of Omaha. Front row, from left, Lincoln Lappe and Jacob Miller of Lincoln

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NCompass Live: Google Forms for Your Library

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘Google Forms for Your Library’, on Wednesday, October 25, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

Learn how to use Google Forms for surveys or polls, program registrations, planning a meeting time and more. You can even collaborate on a form with others. The best part? It’s free and easy to use!

Presenter: Megan Boggs, Seward (NE) Memorial Library

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Nov. 1 – Letters About Literature: Read. Be Inspired. Write Back.
  • Nov. 8 – Using YA Literature to Inspire Teen Girls’ Interests in STEM
  • Nov. 15 – What’s Up @ the Commission?
  • Nov. 29 – Libraries Rock! : Summer Reading Program 2018

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: Paperbacks from Hell: The Twisted History of ’70s and ’80s Horror Fiction by Grady Hendrix

There are two kinds of people in the world: people who would never read a book calledPaperbacks from Hell - cover Satan’s Pets and my kind of people.  For the latter, Paperbacks from Hell is a delight, a treasure trove of unseemly old horror novels from the days when skeletons were popular cover models and literally any animal could be cast as a monster.

Grady Hendrix is building quite a name for himself as a genre fiction standout.  He wrote Horrorstör, history’s greatest novel about a haunted furniture store.  And then he wrote My Best Friend’s Exorcism, which he describes as “Beaches meets The Exorcist, only it’s set in the Eighties.”  So we’re all pretty lucky that he found the time to compile this book and document the explosion of paperbacks that followed Ira Levin and William Peter Blatty’s surprise success.

It’s a long trek from Rosemary’s Baby & The Exorcist to Viking mummies & psychotic cows, and Hendrix navigates masterfully.  If the only noteworthy thing about a book is a shark/grizzly bear fight, that’s all that’s mentioned.  More worthwhile works get lengthier treatments and Hendrix maintains his sense of humor throughout.  I suspect that it’s probably more enjoyable to read his witty synopses than most of the novels they describe.  For example:

“[T]hough we all feel sympathy for the yeti who hates snow in Snowman, how many ski instructors will we allow him to decapitate before we hire a bunch of hunters and Vietnam vets to go after him with crossbows armed with tiny nuclear arrowheads?”

Yes!  The proceedings are organized topically, so we spend time with killer clowns, critters, toys, Santas, and skeletons, the last being my favorites due to their assorted jobs.  Even in this tiny niche of publishing history, there’s a lot of diversity and the only thing that really unifies these books is that they are all better than Paulo Coelho’s The Alchemist.

I’d recommend reading this in print, as it’s the best way to experience the garish covers that are reprinted here, and I’d also advise keeping a notebook handy—this book almost doubled my “to-read” list.  A wildly fun read that’s perfect for pumpkin season.

Hendrix, G., & Errickson, W. (2017). Paperbacks from Hell: the twisted history of 70s and 80s horror fiction. Philadelphia: Quirk Books.

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Throwback Thursday: Main Street, McCook, Nebraska

Photograph of Main Street, McCook, Nebraska in 1884.  Photo provided by the High Plains Historical Society and Museum collection located in Nebraska Memories.  http://memories.nebraska.gov/cdm/ref/collection/hphsm/id/22

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Gov. Ricketts Unveils Library Innovation Studios Makerspace Partnership

Governor Pete Ricketts announced that 18 Nebraska libraries will be the initial local participants in Nebraska’s Library Innovation Studios: Transforming Rural Communities project to create library makerspaces. The Nebraska Library Commission was recently awarded a National Leadership Grant of $530,732 by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) for this partnership project with the University of Nebraska Lincoln (UNL), Nebraska Innovation Studio, Nebraska Extension, Regional Library Systems, and local public libraries.

“This partnership demonstrates how our Nebraska communities can use technology and education to empower community residents to create, learn, and invent,” said Governor Ricketts. “By expanding the skills of the workforce in our communities, supporting entrepreneurs, and encouraging lifelong learning, this partnership reinforces our vibrant business climate and supports community development.”

The project uses Library Innovation Studios makerspaces hosted by public libraries to support community engagement and participatory learning experiences by providing access to technology and innovative learning tools not readily accessible locally….READ MORE at http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases/1710Gov.RickettsUnveilsLIS.aspx. 

Posted in Education & Training, General, Grants, Public Relations, Technology, Youth Services | Leave a comment

Friday Reads: A Little Life by Hana Yanagihara

Image result for a little lifeI read A Little Life by Hana Yanagihara all day and all night for a full weekend. After I returned it to the library I lay awake thinking about the characters in the story and what it all meant. While reading, I had to physically put the book down and take a break from the progressively horrible life that was inflicted on the main character.

This book is written from the rotating point of view of Jude and several of his close friends. Jude doesn’t talk much about his past to his friends, but the reader is made aware of the damage inflicted upon him by the monsters in his past. You, dear reader, will barely be willing to believe the words on the page.

So why do I like this monstrosity of a book? The answer lies in the pure, face slapping truth in the book. Many books are about a character living through hell and learning to heal on the other side. This book is a reminder that not everybody makes it through to the other side. Bad things happen and sometimes there is nothing that can be done. Life is not all sunshine and happiness.

In A Little Life, Jude is nearly suicidal throughout most of the book. His friends care deeply but have no idea what to do. It is dark, gritty and unbearable at times. It is ‘set the book down and go to your happy place’ unbearable. Now think about this: the reader can set down the book and escape to safety. But there are people in the world who have no safety zone. Their world is so dark it would make no difference if they never opened their eyes.

Most people have never lived through hell. That is good. But for those who did, this book is a reminder that there are two options in life: you can close your eyes and stop breathing, or you can stand up and fight. Jude is partially on the way to healing at times, but there are entirely too many demons from the past waiting to drag him back into the shadows.

Jude’s story is not only for the downtrodden. A Little Life is also for the people who care about the downtrodden. If you have ever watched someone try to crawl out of the sewage rot that was their childhood, this book is for you. Read about where Jude’s friends went wrong. Read about how silence kills. Read about how it is not your fault if they slip back and drown in their own sewage infested mind. Healing is a choice that not everybody makes. Some people get out, but some will not.

This book is dark and only gets darker as you turn the pages. Many of you will hate and loathe this book. Most probably will not make it from cover to cover. That’s okay. This book is not for everybody.

But I need to tell somebody about this book. I hope this book reaches into a dark pit of misery and let’s somebody know they are not alone. I hope this book makes at least one person stand up and say ‘no more’. The demon does not get to win. Take control. Pack your bags and get out. With time and distance, the past loses power. Every time you stand up and speak, the past loses power.

It takes a few minutes to curl up and die. Survival takes a lifetime.

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NCompass Live: ALA Book Club Central with Author Stephanie Powell Watts!

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘ALA Book Club Central with Author Stephanie Powell Watts!’, on Wednesday, October 18, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

We are very excited to announce that Stephanie Powell Watts, author of the inaugural Sarah Jessica Parker Book Club Central selection, No One Is Coming to Save Us, will be joining us to chat about her debut novel.

In addition, United for Libraries President Elect Skip Dye, VP, library marketing and digital sales at Penguin Random House, will discuss Sarah Jessica Parker’s most recent Book Club Central pick, Exit West by Mohsin Hamid, and resources for book clubs. Jennifer Hart, SVP, Associate Publisher and Group Marketing Director of William Morrow, will also be joining us to discuss Book Club Girl and the resources available through that program.

The American Library Association (ALA) launched Book Club Central at the ALA Annual Conference in Chicago this summer with the website and Honorary Chair Sarah Jessica Parker’s first selection.

Book Club Central is a place for author interviews, book recommendations and reviews, as well as discussion questions and information on how to start and moderate a book club.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Oct. 11 – NO NCOMPASS LIVE THIS WEEK – Enjoy the 2017 NLA/NSLA Annual Conference!
  • Oct. 25 – Google Forms for Your Library
  • Nov. 8 – Using YA Literature to Inspire Teen Girls’ Interests in STEM
  • Nov. 29 – Libraries Rock! : Summer Reading Program 2018

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Nebraska’s Champions of Literature and Literacy Honored

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
October 11, 2017

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Mary Jo Ryan
402-471-3434
800-307-2665

Nebraska’s Champions of Literature and Literacy Honored

The Nebraska Center for the Book will present the 2017 Jane Geske Award to American Life in Poetry and Ted Kooser at the October 21 Celebration of Nebraska Books in downtown Lincoln. This weekly newspaper column, created and compiled by Ted Kooser, 2004-2006 U.S. Poet Laureate, exemplifies dedication to contemporary poetry in Nebraska and beyond. The project is a partnership of the Library of Congress, The Poetry Foundation, and the Department of English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

The Nebraska Center for the Book annually presents the Jane Geske Award to organizations, businesses, libraries, schools, associations, or other groups that have made an exceptional contribution to literacy, books, reading, bookselling, libraries, or Nebraska literature. The Jane Geske Award commemorates Geske’s passion for books, and was established in recognition of her contributions to the well-being of the libraries of Nebraska. Jane Geske was the director of the Nebraska Library Commission, a founding member of the Nebraska Center for the Book, a Lincoln bookseller, and a long-time leader in Nebraska library and literary activities.

The Nebraska Center for the Book will also present the 2017 Mildred Bennett Award to Nancy Johnson of Central City. This dedicated volunteer is honored for her contributions to Nebraska’s literary tradition, including her long-term efforts on behalf of the Lone Tree Literary Society promoting the life and work of Wright Morris and many years of service to the One Book One Nebraska program.

The Mildred Bennett Award recognizes an individual who has made a significant contribution to fostering the literary tradition in Nebraska, reminding us of the literary and intellectual heritage that enriches our lives and molds our world. The award recognizes inspired leadership and service on behalf of Nebraska literature, highlighting how the recipients follow the example of Mildred Bennett, the charismatic founder and long-time President of the Willa Cather Pioneer Memorial and Educational Foundation. The award seeks to heighten awareness and interest in Nebraska’s literary heritage and to enrich the lives of Nebraskans and readers everywhere.

The Presidential Award for Literacy will be presented to the Hastings Literacy Program.  This program is recognized with this special Nebraska Center for the Book Presidential Award for service to the Hastings community and surrounding area, providing educational support for hundreds of adults including assisting them with reading, language, and other basic skills needed to meet the challenges encountered in daily life and to take full advantage of opportunities in society.

The Presidential Award for Literacy is a special award given this year. This discretionary award allows the Nebraska Center for the Book to honor exemplary programs, bringing recognition to the Hastings Literacy Program’s efforts and highlighting their success with literacy programming. This is the first time the Nebraska Center for the Book has made this award.

The October 21 Celebration, free and open to the public, will also feature presentation of the 2017 Nebraska Book Awards, and some of the winning authors will read from their work. A list of winners is posted at http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/awards.html. The Celebration of Nebraska Books is scheduled for 2:30 – 6:30 p.m. at the Nebraska History Museum, 131 Centennial Mall North, Lincoln NE, with the Nebraska Center for the Book Annual Meeting to be held prior to the Celebration at 1:30 p.m. A keynote presentation at 2:45 p.m. will feature the 2017 One Book One Nebraska selection, Black Elk Speaks (University of Nebraska Press) by John G. Neihardt. Timothy G. Anderson, author of the biography Lonesome Dreamer: The Life of John G. Neihardt (University of Nebraska Press) will speak. An awards reception honoring the winning authors, book signings, and announcement of the 2018 One Book One Nebraska book choice will conclude the festivities.

The Celebration of Nebraska Books is sponsored by Nebraska Center for the Book and Nebraska Library Commission, with support from the Nebraska State Historical Society’s Nebraska History Museum and Friends of the University of Nebraska Press. Humanities Nebraska provides support for One Book One Nebraska. For more information see http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/programs/celebration.html and www.facebook.com/NebraskaCenterfortheBook.

The Nebraska Center for the Book is housed at the Nebraska Library Commission and brings together the state’s readers, writers, booksellers, librarians, publishers, printers, educators, and scholars to build the community of the book, supporting programs to celebrate and stimulate public interest in books, reading, and the written word. The Nebraska Center for the Book is supported by the national Center for the Book in the Library of Congress and the Nebraska Library Commission.

As the state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services, “bringing together people and information.”

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.

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Friday Reads: Figures in Silk, by Vanora Bennett

Figures in Silk, by Vanora Bennett, once again falls into my favorite genre to read: historical fiction.  It is a glimpse into early Tudor history: not into life at court itself, but rather into the way that the political machinations affected and disrupted the lives of London’s ordinary citizens and particularly its powerful merchants.

The year is 1471.   Edward IV, who won the throne with the help of his brother, Richard, Duke of Gloucester, is restoring law and order after the long years of war during the War of the Roses. Under Edward IV, life in England begins to improve. Business is booming once more and the printing and silk industries prosper in London.

 

When silk merchant John Lambert marries off his two beautiful daughters, their fortunes are forever changed. Elder daughter Jane Shore begins a notorious liaison with the king while industrious and clever Isabel finds herself married into the house of Claver, a wealthy silk dynasty. Fate delivers Isabel a challenge when her new husband is killed and she is forced into apprenticeship to her mother-in-law, Alice Claver.

Isabel is already an accomplished embroiderer of silk in her own right, but it is from Alice Claver that Isabel learns all there is to know about the silk trade and its’ purchase from Italy, Persia, Spain, Tunisia, and beyond. Isabel learns to make her way in this new world of silk and forges a contract with her sister’s lover, King Edward IV.  This new contract allows Isabel to bring silk production to London for the first time, and to hopefully break the monopoly that Venetian silk makers have over the silk trade.

As Isabel grows in power, and her plan for a silk industry run by Englishwomen is set into motion, the political landscape shifts in dangerous ways.  One sister will fall as the other rises and choices must be made that will change their lives forever.

If you enjoyed Vanora Bennett’s first novel Portrait of an Unknown Woman, you will definitely enjoy Figures in Silk!

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Free webinar recording: “Celebrating National Friends of Libraries Week”

United for Libraries has made available a free webcast recording on “Celebrating National Friends of Libraries Week: Promoting Your Group and Library.”

Plan now for the 12th annual National Friends of Libraries Week, Oct. 15-21, 2017. This webinar will offer ideas on how to celebrate the week within your group, library, and community. Hear about the 2016 National Friends of Libraries Week Award winners, the Holdrege (NE) Area Friends of the Library and the Friends of the Glendale (Ariz.) Public Library. And learn about the ALA Store’s new customizable “Friend Your Library” products designed specifically for Friends.

View the webcast recording and learn more on the National Friends of Libraries Week website.

United for Libraries Friends group members are also eligible to apply for National Friends of Libraries Week Awards. All Nebraska public libraries are members of United for Libraries through the statewide membership purchased by the Nebraska Library Commission. Two groups will be awarded $250 each in honor of their celebrations during the week.

For information about the award and to submit an application for your group, visit the Awards website.

Posted in Public Library Boards of Trustees, Public Relations | 1 Comment

JoAnn McManus: Nebraska Excellence in Leadership

JoAnn McManus PhotoJoAnn McManus (nee Jedlicka) was recently selected as a co-recipient of the Library Commission’s state of Nebraska Excellence in Leadership recognition award. She joined the Nebraska Library Commission in 2010 to work on the Library Broadband Builds Nebraska Communities Project funded through the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP). Currently, she is working with the Library Innovation Studios Project (funded through an IMLS grant) with a team of Library Commission staff.

JoAnn grew up on a farm just outside of Schuyler, NE and is one hundred percent Czechoslovakian.  She graduated from Schuyler Central High School and is the youngest of thirteen children. Her mother was also from a family of thirteen. JoAnn was named after her first cousin, who was a child movie star named JoAnn Marlowe (Mares) who’s most famous picture was Mildred Pierce amongst the ten to her credit.

JoAnn earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration from the University of Nebraska at Kearney and is a Graduate of the Economic Development Institute from the University of Oklahoma.  She also completed coursework in Grant Writing and Research from the University of Nebraska at Omaha. JoAnn has held various positions, many in the economic development field and almost all in the area of project or grants management.  Most of the organizations JoAnn worked for served counties throughout the state including NPPD, Nebraska Departments of Economic Development, and the Nebraska Department of Labor so JoAnn has done her share of traveling to Nebraska communities. JoAnn says the most challenging thing about her current assignment is that there is so much to do in a concentrated amount of time especially in the first few months. Luckily there are others on the team that are going through these same challenges to move the project forward.  The best thing about working with librarians is serving Nebraska in a different way than in her former jobs,

If JoAnn could have dinner with anyone she would like to dine with Warren Buffett and should a winning lottery ticket find its way to her possession, she would retire and begin traveling with Hawaii and Ireland being top of her list. When she is not working at the Commission, JoAnn enjoys going to estate sales and is drawn to buying pretty objects. She has one case and two booths at the Aardvark Antique Mall and her family is always surprised when what looks like a useless purchase actually sells.  JoAnn won’t be quitting her day job anytime soon, selling ‘treasures’ pencils out as more of a hobby.

JoAnn is married to Brian McManus and together they have a son Daniel. They also share their home with one cat named M&M. A perfect day would include spending time with her family enjoying adventures together. Congratulations JoAnn!NLC Logo

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What’s Up Doc? New State Agency Publications at the Nebraska Library Commission

New state agency publications have been received at the Nebraska Library Commission for September 2017.  Included are reports from the Nebraska Auditor of Public Accounts, the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, the Nebraska Secretary of State, and new books from the University of Nebraska Press, to name a few.

All items, except the books from the University of Nebraska Press, are available for immediate viewing and printing by clicking on the highlighted .pdf link above, or directly in the .pdf below.

Posted in Books & Reading, Education & Training, General, Information Resources, Uncategorized, What's Up Doc / Govdocs | Leave a comment

NCompass Live: Talking Books: Helping Patrons All Over Nebraska!

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘Talking Books: Helping Patrons All Over Nebraska!’, on Wednesday, October 4, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

Join Scott Scholz, Director of the Nebraska Library Commission Talking Book & Braille Service, to learn about the free audiobooks, audio magazines, and braille that are available through the TBBS. Scott will also talk about the various services that come together to provide accessibility to different kinds of resources for people with reading disabilities.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Oct. 11 – NO NCOMPASS LIVE THIS WEEK – Enjoy the 2017 NLA/NSLA Annual Conference!
  • Oct. 18 – ALA Book Club Central
  • Oct. 25 – Google Forms for Your Library
  • Nov. 8 – Using YA Literature to Inspire Teen Girls’ Interests in STEM

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

Posted in Education & Training, Talking Book & Braille Service (TBBS) | Leave a comment

OCLC Discontinues Publishing Print Editions of Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC)

According to information posted to the OCLC Dewey Services website, OCLC has decided to stop publishing English-language print editions of the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC):

  • The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) is frequently updated by the Dewey editorial team. These changes are available in WebDewey the next day. Consequently, print editions, with their multiyear publication cycles, became obsolete very quickly. In an effort to provide libraries with the most up-to-date information available, OCLC has decided to discontinue publishing English-language print editions of the DDC. This means that:

    • OCLC will sell remaining copies of English-language print products based on DDC 23 (including Abridged 15 and 200 Religion Class) until June 2018 or until current copies are depleted.

As of earlier this week, OCLC indicated that all English-language print copies of DDC 23 have been sold. English-language print copies of DDC Abridged 15 (well suited for the classification needs of libraries with up to 20,000 titles in their collections) are still available to purchase and will be sold until June 2018 or until current copies are depleted.

DDC Abridged 15 (print edition) can be ordered online through the Nebraska Library Commission while OCLC supplies last. The discounted price is available on the order form.

The Nebraska Library Commission also facilitates an annual group subscription to WebDewey, which allows you to:

  • access the DDC and related information
  • search or browse DDC numbers, Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH), Mapped MeSH and BISAC headings
  • access authority records from links in the WebDewey records
  • add your own notes and display them in context

You can learn more about about this group subscription on our OCLC Dewey Services page.

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Talking Books and Banned Books Week

We don’t often think of banned book issues when considering talking book and braille library services, but yesterday, the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped shared this fascinating story upon the passing of Hugh Hefner:

“Hugh Hefner’s death on Wednesday at age 91 brings to mind ‘Playboy’ magazine’s role in the history of NLS. In the early 1980s, various objections were raised about ‘Playboy’ being offered as part of the NLS magazine program. In response, the House and the Senate decided to end taxpayer funding for the braille edition of the magazine. The American Council of the Blind, the American Library Association, the Blinded Veterans Association, and others filed suit, and on August 28, …1986, a federal judge ruled that withholding funds for ‘Playboy’ violated the First Amendment. NLS continues to offer braille and audio editions of ‘Playboy.’ And, just to be clear: they only include the articles.”

In the NLS collection, “The Playboy Interview (DB17158)” and “The Playboy Interview II (DB21612)” include more than fifty of the magazine’s signature Q&As with famous personalities, including politicians, actors, musicians, artists, and authors. Also “Playboy Stories: The Best of Forty Years of Short Fiction (DB42199)” collects some of the magazine’s award-winning fiction.

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Friday Reads: My Italian Bulldozer by Alexander McCall Smith

Alexander McCall Smith is on a short list of my favorite authors. I adore his #1 Ladies Detective Agency, 44 Scotland Street, and Corduroy Mansions series, and when I visited Edinburgh a few years ago I made sure to visit 43 Scotland Street (there is no 44) and the Cumberland Bar just around the corner. I was delighted to be in the world of Bertie and all the adults he endures.  Smith writes some standalone books too, and for me those have been hit and miss. My Italian Bulldozer is not part of a series and would be a wonderful way to introduce yourself to this author if you haven’t already made his acquaintance.

The title alone promises humor in a picturesque setting. Paul Stuart is a food and wine writer and his girlfriend of four years has just left him for her personal trainer. Paul’s editor, Gloria, sends him to Italy for personal respite and time to work on his next book featuring Tuscan cuisine. As a result of a rental car snafu, and a short bout in jail, he ends up borrowing a bulldozer. This slows him down considerably but it soon becomes apparent how handy a bulldozer can be in certain situations! The cast of characters he encounters are the true talent of Smith’s writing: the woman whose car is upended; the man who needs assistance digging a ditch; and anonymous townspeople who “borrow” the bulldozer from its public parking space. This small community is one that keeps track of everything and everyone and Paul quickly becomes a part of the comings and goings.

After rescuing the young American college professor in the upended car, there is chemistry between the two writers. Enter the ex-girlfriend, who shows up to apologize in person, with Gloria, the editor, arriving close behind. The events that follow may be predictable but I was more than pleased with the ending. I began thinking that I need to plan to a trip to Italy and wonder if these idyllic adventures really can happen in rural parts of the country as they have in so many of my favorite movies and books. This is a quick read and one that would be perfect to take on vacation, not terribly taxing and satisfying for all the senses.

Smith, Alexander McCall. My Italian Bulldozer. Pantheon; First American edition. edition, 2017

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Finalists for 2018 One Book One Nebraska Announced

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
September 27, 2017

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Mary Jo Ryan
402-471-3434
800-307-2665

Finalists for 2018 One Book One Nebraska Announced

What book will all Nebraskans be encouraged to read in 2018? We will all find out on October 21. Two poetry collections, one memoir, and two novels—all stories with ties to Nebraska and the Great Plains—are the finalists for the 2018 One Book One Nebraska statewide reading program. The finalists are:

  • The Bones of Paradise by Jonis Agee, William Morrow (2016)
  • Nebraska Poetry: A Sesquicentennial Anthology 1867-2017 edited by Daniel Simon, Stephen F. Austin University Press (2017)
  • Nebraska Presence: An Anthology of Poetry edited by Greg Kosmicki and Mary K. Stillwell, The Backwaters Press (2007)
  • Ordinary Spaceman: From Boyhood Dreams to Astronaut by Clayton Anderson, University of Nebraska Press (2015)
  • Swan Gondola: A Novel by Timothy Schaffert, Riverhead Books (2015)

The One Book One Nebraska reading program, now in its thirteenth year, is sponsored by the Nebraska Center for the Book, Humanities Nebraska, and Nebraska Library Commission. It encourages Nebraskans across the state to read and discuss the same book, chosen from books written by Nebraska authors or that have a Nebraska theme or setting. A Nebraska Center for the Book committee selected the five finalists from a list of twenty-six titles nominated by Nebraskans. In the coming weeks, Nebraska Center for the Book board members will vote on the 2018 selection.

Nebraskans are invited to attend the Celebration of Nebraska Books on October 21, where the choice for the 2018 One Book One Nebraska will be announced at 5:30 p.m. at the Nebraska State Historical Society’s Nebraska History Museum, 131 Centennial Mall North, in downtown Lincoln. This year’s One Book One Nebraska selection, Black Elk Speaks (University of Nebraska Press, 2014) by John G. Neihardt will be featured in a keynote presentation by Timothy G. Anderson, author of the biography Lonesome Dreamer: The Life of John G. Neihardt (University of Nebraska Press, 2016) at 2:45 p.m. See http://onebook.nebraska.gov or https://www.facebook.com/OneBookOneNebraska for more information about ongoing 2017 One Book One Nebraska activities.

The October 21 Celebration of Nebraska Books is scheduled for 2:30 – 6:30 p.m., with the Nebraska Center for the Book Annual Meeting to be held at 1:30 p.m. Awards will be presented to the winners of the 2017 Nebraska Book Awards, and some of the winning authors will read from their work. A list of Nebraska Book Award winners is posted at http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/awards.html. The Celebration of Nebraska Books is sponsored by the Nebraska Center for the Book and Nebraska Library Commission with support from the Nebraska State Historical Society’s Nebraska History Museum. Humanities Nebraska provides support for the One Book One Nebraska keynote presentation. For more information, contact Mary Jo Ryan, maryjo.ryan@nebraska.gov, 402-471-3434 or 800-307-2665. Confirmed presenters will be announced at www.centerforthebook.nebraska.gov and http://www.facebook.com/NebraskaCenterfortheBook in advance of the Celebration.

The Nebraska Center for the Book is housed at the Nebraska Library Commission and brings together the state’s readers, writers, booksellers, librarians, publishers, printers, educators, and scholars to build the community of the book, supporting programs to celebrate and stimulate public interest in books, reading, and the written word. The Nebraska Center for the Book is supported by the national Center for the Book in the Library of Congress and the Nebraska Library Commission.

As the state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services, “bringing together people and information.”

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.

 

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Throwback Thursday: View of Lincoln, Nebraska from Capitol, 1875.

Picture postcard of the view of Lincoln, Nebraska, from the Nebraska State Capitol Building in 1875.

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What Goes Around

Some people say change is inevitable, but how much have things really changed over the past 100 years?

In 1917, the Nebraska Telephone Co. Building at left was completed in Omaha with a “modern telephone exchange” (Omaha Public Library Collection). There were over 6,000 independent telephone companies in the United States at that time with a fair number in Nebraska. Over the years many of those companies merged or were bought out. Today with the cell phone technology, different service providers, who buy out and/or merge with each other regularly, are again working to provide a new “telephone exchange” by expanding cell phone service to the more rural areas of Nebraska.

Transportation was in flux in 1917. While horse-drawn vehicles were still in use in some rural areas, motorized vehicles were taking over–both gas and electric. This brought about the building of automobile dealerships, gas stations, garages, solid-surface roads, and more. The Osborne Garage in Sidney at right was one of many such businesses being built in Nebraska (Cheyenne County Historical Society and Museum Collection). Mechanics today use computers to tune-up cars and trucks, but the basic need is still there for new tires, oil changes, etc. Now new dealerships and their garages are being built on the outskirts of town. And while gas cars won out for a number of decades, electric cars are making a comeback and bringing about the construction of re-charging stations. And who doesn’t run into road construction–or the need for it–on a regular basis?

The population growth in early twentieth-century Nebraska brought a demand for amenities such as public libraries. At least 72 Nebraska towns erected new public library buildings between 1900 and 1920. 1917 alone saw the construction of at least nine public library buildings, two of which are still used as libraries: Cordelia B. Preston Memorial Library in Orleans and Arcadia Public Library at left (Nebraska Library Commission Collection). Other libraries have had to move on from old buildings to new buildings as technology has brought demands for different services. In 2017, Blair Public Library and Scribner Public Library both celebrated grand openings of their new facilities.

Live entertainment was popular in 1917 as it is today. In the Boileau Chautauqua Company photograph at right cast members in costume pose in a car. (Townsend Studio Collection).  As the banner on the rear promotes the model of the car, perhaps this is an early example of promoting products for corporate sponsorship. While many people still traveled by train in 1917, touring cars (open cars that could carry five or more passengers a long distance) would become popular. A car allowed more flexibility in timetables and destinations. Today many entertainers move on to their next venue in tour buses.

So visit Nebraska Memories and see what old things or concepts are new again among the many historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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