Friday Reads: The Sari Shop Widow

Anjali Kapadia is in a bit of trouble. Her family’s business, a chic sari boutique named Silk & Sapphires in the heart of New Jersey’s Little India, is in financial trouble. In an effort to save the business from bankruptcy, her father has called on his entrepreneur brother, Jeevan Kapadia, to come and help. However, Jeevan has a reputation for being a bit of a dictator; he likes things done his way, or not at all. The idea fills Anjali with dread, but she will do just about anything for this business, which she helped build after the death of her husband ten years earlier.

When Jeevan arrives, though, he is not what Anjali was expecting, and he brings along a visitor he treats like a son. Rishi Shan is Jeevan’s partner in business, and has brought along some ideas that will radically change the small boutique Anjali has put her heart and soul into. What’s more, he imposes on Anjali’s life in a way that makes her wonder if she’ll lose her heart to him in the process.

The Sari Shop Widow is a lovely story that gives readers an insight into Indian culture and values. The need for Anjali to remarry is the underlying current throughout the novel, and the traditional values of her uncle and parents war with her mainstream American views of the world. Yet the relationships Anjali deals with are universal, so anyone, whether familiar with Indian culture or not, will enjoy the story.

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What’s Up Doc? New State Agency Publications at the Nebraska Library Commission

New state agency publications have been received at the Nebraska Library Commission for February 2017.  Included are titles from the Nebraska Auditor of Public Accounts, the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency, the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality, the Nebraska Department of Roads, and the University of Nebraska Press, to name a few.

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Throwback Thursday: Nebraska City Bridge

Postcard of the Nebraska City Bridge, Nebraska City, Nebraska.  Approximate date early 1900’s.

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Good Times in Nebraska

When people think of places like Nebraska, and the American West in general, they often assume that residents have little to no access to cultural institutions. That is, no libraries, opera houses, theaters, art museums or symphonies.  Those of us who live in the West, know this to be otherwise.  In fact, nineteenth century mining communities hosted traveling acting troupe or minstrel shows. Other early towns built opera houses and theaters, while some opened small libraries.
American Music Hall, Omaha, Neb.
With its large population, Omaha was home to numerous theaters, such as the American Music Hall and the Orpheum Theater.

15th and Harney Streets, Orpheum Theatre and City National Bank, Omaha, Neb.
Theaters and other entertainment venues could be found in smaller communities as well. Opera houses, for example, could be found in Valley and Papillion. They may not have been the most beautiful of buildings, but they provided stages for more than a few talented people. More importantly, opera productions allowed people with a brief respite from the rigors of prairie life.

Opera House, Valley, Neb. Interior of opera house in Papillion, Nebraska

Additionally, Nebraska was home to more than few musical groups.  Composed of local musicians, these groups enabled participants to hone their talents while providing entertainment for others.  For   some musicians, particularly those who immigrated from outside the United States, music may have not only connected them to fellow immigrants, but linked them to their former homes as well.

Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show

German Stringed Quartet

 

 

 

 

If the opera or a musical gathering didn’t provide enough entertainment, people could attend Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show when it roared into the state.  Perhaps not high culture, but entertaining!

Visit http://memories.nebraska.gov/ to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

 

 

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E-rate Form 471 Application Filing Window Opens

The Form 471 application filing window for Funding Year 2017 opened yesterday at noon EST and will close on Thursday, May 11 at 11:59 pm EDT. You may now log on to the E-rate Productivity Center (EPC) and file your FCC Form 471 for FY2017.

This makes Thursday, April 13, the deadline to post your Form 470 to the USAC website, meet the 28-day posting requirement for the competitive bidding process, and submit a Form 471 by the filing window closing date.

However, we do not recommend waiting until the last day to submit your Form 470. If there are any issues that day, like the E-rate servers are slowed down because it is the last day to submit, or you can’t submit the form due to reasons on your end, like illness, weather, power outage, etc., then you would miss the deadline and lose out on E-rate altogether. So, get your E-rate Form 470 submitted as soon as possible!

IMPORTANT: Before you file your Form 471, check your Form 470 Receipt Notification for your Allowable Contract Date – the first date you are allowed to submit your 471. Do not submit your 471 before that date. Remember, after you submit your Form 470, you must wait 28 days to submit your Form 471. Note: This Notice is no longer mailed to you. It is now sent to you within the EPC portal and will be in your News feed.

Do you need help completing your forms? Do you have questions about E-rate? You’re in luck!

USAC has Form 471 resources on their website:

And more recorded webinars, demos, and training materials are available on the NLC E-rate webpage.

If you have any questions or need any assistance with your E-rate forms, please contact Christa Porter, 800-307-2665, 402-471-3107.

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NCompass Live: Project Outcome: Measuring the True Impact of Public Libraries

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘Project Outcome: Measuring the True Impact of Public Libraries’, on Wednesday, March 1, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

Are your patrons actually benefiting from the programs and services you provide? If so, how can you prove it? The Public Library Association’s latest initiative, Project Outcome, is a FREE online toolkit, offering an innovative and easy-to-use platform for public libraries to measure the impact of their programs and services. Library staff are able to easily measure patron outcomes using the field-tested surveys, quickly analyze their data using ready-made reports and an interactive data dashboard, and take action using the results. This session demonstrates what Project Outcome measures, what is included in the online toolkit, and how libraries of all shapes and sizes can utilize Project Outcome to measure their impact and affect change within their community. Burnsville (WV) Public Library will highlight their experience using Project Outcome.

Presenters: Beth Anderson, Director, Burnsville (WV) Public Library; Samantha Lopez, Project Coordinator, Public Library Association.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • March 8 – Planning for Successful Internships
  • March 15 – Build a Better World: Summer Reading Program 2017
  • March 22 –  Small and Rural Libraries Leading with TV Whitespace
  • March 29 – Conversation Circles: A Simple ESL Program

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Friday Reads: Our Souls at Night by Kent Haruf

At the 2017 Screen Actors Guild Awards, Viola Davis said the following upon accepting her award for Outstanding Performance by a Female for the movie Fences: “What August (Wilson) did so beautifully is he honored the average man …and sometimes we don’t have to shake the world and move the world and create anything that is going to be in the history book. The fact that we breathed and lived a life … means that we have a story and it deserves to be told.”  I think writers who choose ordinary subjects can tell amazing stories. I think this is Kent Haruf’s talent–to tell everyman’s story, the story of those people we all know and recognize, who live next door if not in our own home.

Our Souls at Night was Haruf’s last novel before his death in 2014, and it takes place in the fictional town of Holt, Colorado, a small town created for three of his other novels. Addie Moore and Louis Waters have both lost their partners and have lived a long time in Holt knowing of each other rather than being well acquainted. One day, Addie pays a visit to Lois and asks: “I’m wondering if you would consider coming to my house sometimes to sleep with me … I mean we’re both alone. We’ve been by ourselves for too long. For years. I’m lonely. I think you might be too. I wonder if you could sleep in the night with me. And talk … I’m not talking about sex, I’m talking about getting through the night … the nights are the worst don’t you think?” And this is where their story begins as this invitation turns into many evening conversations and the revelations of life, regrets, and love lost. It confirms how grief needs to be shared with others especially those for whom the loss is similar. When two people form a bond, onlookers will have opinions and often, not so quietly. I could relate to the gossipy town conversations that made me forever choose to live in a city with a population of at least 100,000 or more.

This is a spare read with uncomplicated and honest characters. There is a cadence to Haruf’s books – small town living and the daily minutia that are both familiar and regular. The conversations are ones you’ve had yourself. Spending time in Holt is downshifting to rural America; slowing down and looking people in the eye when you walk past them on the street.

A movie adapted from this book will be released sometime this year, starring Robert Redford and Jane Fonda, who first appeared together in 1967’s Barefoot in the Park. This will be quite a contrast.

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Doc Spot: Unicameral Update

The Unicameral Update is a newsletter produced during each legislative session by the Clerk of the Legislature’s Unicameral Information Office since 1977. The Update covers legislative activity, including floor action and committee hearings, and is available daily online and weekly in print.

To see the Update online, click on any of the highlighted links above.

To receive a free print subscription to the Unicameral Update, call (402)-471-2788, or send an email to Clerk of the Legislature.

The Unicameral Update is also available in audio to Talking Book and Braille (TBBS) patrons. For more information, contact TBBS at (800) 742-7691.

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Big Talk From Small Libraries is tomorrow!

Small libraries! Awesome ideas! FREE!

Join us tomorrow for the Big Talk From Small Libraries 2017 online conference. Registration is still open, so head over to the website and sign up.

This free one-day online conference is aimed at librarians from small libraries, but regardless of how big or small your library is, you are welcome and encouraged to come learn about the innovative things your colleagues are doing in their small libraries.

We have a great agenda for the day, with seven 50 minute sessions plus five 10 minute lightning round sessions. You can log in and out of the conference as you like throughout the day, based on your interest and availability.

And, Nebraska library staff can earn 1 hour of CE Credit for each hour of the conference you attend:  http://nlc.nebraska.gov/CE/bigtalkform.asp

So, come join us for a day of big ideas from small libraries!

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Throwback Thursday: Morton Monument State Park

Postcard of the Morton Monument State Park, Nebraska City, Nebraska.  Approximate date early 1900’s.

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Dense Fog Leads to Head-on Collision

C.B.&Q. Railroad train wreck at Red Cloud, Nebraska, #3 Sunday morning, November 22, 1908, two trains collided at Red Cloud killing two men. According to the article “Disastrous Wreck at Red Cloud” that appeared in the November 27, 1908 issue of The McCook Tribune, “two Burlington trains collided at the west end of the city stock yards at 6:55, doing great damage and killing two men and injuring one.”

“The trains came together just beyond the yard limits, on a big curve, where there was a heavy fill, and the impact was so great that the engine 1225, pulling the extra from the west, was thrown from the track, as it struck 1182, 63’s engine, and was overturned and C.B.&Q. Railroad train wreck at Red Cloud, Nebraska, #5 fell almost bottom side up, killing the two men as she went over. Train 63 was standing still, and the force of the collision was so great that five cars, the tender and engine were badly wrecked, and three cars and the engine on the stock extra were reduced to kindling wood. The wrecking train was ordered from McCook and reached here about 1:30, and the work of cleaning the track was commenced in earnest, and was finally finished at 5:40 p. m., so that trains could go over the track.”

There are six photos of this deadly wreck in Nebraska Memories taken by L. E. Tait. Basic information is written on the edges of each photo but the newspaper article provides more details.C.B.&Q. Railroad train wreck at Red Cloud, Nebraska, #1 After reading the article, I think I was able to match the photos with the information provided in the newspaper article.

The photo labeled #1 shows the wrecking train, that came from McCook, lifting engine 1225. Engine 1225 was part of the stock train.

C.B.&Q. Railroad train wreck at Red Cloud, Nebraska, #2 The photo labeled #2 shows two engines. I’m assuming the one at the top left of the photo is engine 1182. It was part of train No. 63. Along the right side of the photo is engine 1225. I know it’s somewhat hard to tell that this is an engine just by looking at this photo. If you compare the front end of the engine in photo #1 you can see that it matches the pile of metal on the ground.

Photo #4 shows two men sitting on a pile of wreckage. Laying between them is a large axe. The man on the left is sitting on engine 1225, which is upside down.C.B.&Q. Railroad train wreck at Red Cloud, Nebraska, #4 The paper said it “overturned and fell almost bottom side up, killing the two men as she went over.” The caption of the photo reads “1,2, Where Engine Crew Died”. If you look at the ground to the left and right of the engine, you will see the numbers 1 and 2 written on the picture. Killed in the accident were Engineer John W. Bartholoma and Fireman George Snoke. Short obituaries for both men can be found at the end of the newspaper article.

According to the newspaper article “The excitement was intense and more than 3,000 people visited the wreck, coming from Kansas and Nebraska towns for a radius of 20 miles, and most of them remained all day.” When I reading that line my first thought was that the newspaper article had to be exaggerating, that’s a lot of people. Looking closely at photo #6, I think the newspaper could be correct. Look at the huge groups of people on both sides of the track.

If you to read the complete newspaper article, you may have noticed that there was no reference to the dollar amount of damage caused by this wreck. While I was looking over the newspaper page that contained the article about the train wreck, I noticed the “Railroad News Items” along the left side of the page. Two items in this column relate to the wreck at Red Cloud.

  • “The estimate of the total damages of last Sunday’s wreck is placed at near $20,000.”
  • “The wrecking outfit came back from Red Cloud, Wednesday, and the engines – 1182 and 1225 – were started for Havelock, Thursday. The damage was estimated at over $4,000 on the two engines.”

Below the railroad news, you will find “Card of Thanks” from the Bartholoma and Snoke families.

I hope you enjoyed learning more about the C.B.&Q. (Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company) train wreck at Red Cloud. Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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Eclipse Glasses and Eclipse Education Kit

On August 21, 2017, a spectacular total eclipse of the Sun will be visible across the width of the continental U.S. for the first time since 1918.  Every state will have at least 60% of the Sun covered by the Moon, and lucky people on a narrow path from Oregon to South Carolina will see the stunning beauty of totality. STAR_Net’s NASA@ My Library initiative with support from NASA, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Research Corporation, and Google, is distributing over 2 million solar viewing glasses and an Eclipse Education Kit to public libraries.

Apply for Eclipse Glasses & Education Kit!

Posted in Education & Training, General, Information Resources, Programming, Technology, Uncategorized, What's Up Doc / Govdocs | 1 Comment

Free Educational Resources at Census.gov

Census.gov Can Help You!
Let Census.gov show you how to find and use Census data for your everyday uses, including informing your business planning, supporting grant proposals and research projects, planning of local schools and hospitals, and much more! Whether you’re looking for economic or demographic data, we can teach you how to get what you need for your various projects.

 

 

Options for Learning
There are three main ways that you can learn to find Census data. And all of it is free!

  • Webinars – see the list below for our upcoming webinars. No registration is needed.
    We also have a network of Data Specialists who can provide training throughout the nation – these webinars require registration.
  • Video Tutorials – We have a growing number in our Training Resources Library.
  • Classroom Training – We do this when distance and staff resources allow.  Often, as an alternative to a classroom training, we can schedule a webinar for you on the topic you’re interested in!

Take Advantage of the Data Today!

Upcoming Trainings:

Feb 22, 2017    Where to Find Business & Economic Data on census.gov

Feb 22, 2017    Statistics in Schools: Resources for Teaching and Learning

Feb 22, 2017    Introduction to the American Community Survey Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) Files

Feb 22, 2017    Statistics for Reporters: Find the Stories that Matter in Your Community and Get them Right

Feb 23, 2017    Census Reporter

Feb 23, 2017    OnTheMap: Where are the Jobs?

Feb 23, 2017    Understanding the American Community Survey

Feb 23, 2017    Measuring and Mapping Diversity and Emerging Communities

Feb 27, 2017    Navigating the American FactFinder

Feb 28, 2017    Income & Poverty Related Statistics

Feb 28, 2017    Creating Custom Tables and Colorful Maps Using American FactFinder

Feb 28, 2017    Your Neighborhood by the Numbers: Advanced American FactFinder (Tracts, Block Groups, and Blocks)

Feb 28, 2017    Measuring America Series: Accessing County Business Patterns Data

Mar 01, 2017    Your Business by The Numbers: Census Business Builder App

Mar 02, 2017    The American Community Survey (ACS) & Your Community by the Numbers

Mar 02, 2017    Data on a Deadline: Quick Data Tools & Interactive Maps

Mar 02, 2017    Quick Data Tools

Mar 02, 2017    What’s With that Pop Clock?— and Other Insights of the Population Estimates Program

Mar 03, 2017    Map It!

Mar 06, 2017    On the Map – Employment Dynamics

Mar 07, 2017    Quarterly Workforce Indicators @ Your Fingertips: QWI Explorer

Mar 07, 2017    Where to Find Business & Economic Data on census.gov

Mar 07, 2017    Census Data Prep for Tableau Public

Mar 08, 2017    LED OnTheMap: The Road to Local Employment Dynamics

Mar 08, 2017    Measuring America Series: Accessing Public School System Finances Data

Mar 09, 2017    Your Community by the Numbers: Race, Ethnicity, Foreign Born, and Ancestry

Mar 09, 2017    Census Data Prep for Tableau Public – Repeated

Mar 13, 2017    Veterans by the Numbers

Mar 14, 2017    Census Data Prep for Tableau Public – Repeated

Mar 14, 2017    Race, Ethnicity, Foreign Born and Ancestry by the Numbers

Mar 28, 2017    Making Sense of the American Community Survey

Mar 29, 2017    MAPLAB: Advanced American FactFinder for Tracts and Block Groups

Mar 30, 2017    Data on a Deadline: A Data Access Workshop for Journalists

Apr 06, 2017    Measuring America Series: Accessing Labor Force and Related Statistics

Apr 13, 2017    Measuring America Series: Accessing Work From Home Data

Apr 19, 2017    Using American Community Survey Estimates and Margins of Error

May 04, 2017    Measuring America Series: Accessing Industry, Occupation and Class of Worker Statistics

May 11, 2017    Emergency Planning and Response with Census Bureau Data

May 17, 2017    How to Use American Community Survey Geodatabase Files and ArcMap

Jun 21, 2017    Using the Census API with the American Community Survey

Jul 06, 2017     Accessing TIGERweb

Aug 03, 2017    Measuring America Series: Locating Data on Entrepreneurs and Related Statistics

Aug 30, 2017    Introduction to the American Community Survey

Nov 08, 2017    Accessing American Community Survey Data for Detailed Population Group

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Talking Book Advisory Committee Seeks Nominees

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
February 17, 2016

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Scott Scholz
402-471-6553
800-742-7691

Talking Book Advisory Committee Seeks Nominees

Two vacancies currently exist on the Advisory Committee to the Nebraska Library Commission Talking Book and Braille Service. The purpose of the committee is to represent the needs of talking book and Braille borrowers and to make recommendations concerning library policies, services, and programs. Membership consists primarily of library users but may include librarians, educators, health care providers, and others who understand the needs of individuals with disabilities. The committee normally meets twice a year.

The Talking Book and Braille Service provides free talking books, magazines, playback equipment, and Braille to any resident of Nebraska who cannot see regular print, or hold a book, or turn its pages. Books and magazines are received and returned through the mail postage-free or downloaded directly from the Internet. Persons interested in serving on the committee should contact Scott Scholz, Talking Book and Braille Service Director, 1200 N Street, Suite 120, Lincoln, NE 68508-2023. Phone: 402-471-6553 or 800-742-7691, fax: 402-471-6244, email: nlc.talkingbook@nebraska.gov. Deadline: March 20, 2017.
As Nebraska’s state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans.  The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services-“bringing together people and information.”

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.

 

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Free Webinars from National Network of Libraries of Medicine/MidContinental Region

Tomorrow!  Discover NLM Resources and More: Resources for K-12 Health & Science Education

Wednesday, February 22, 2017 1pm MT / 2pm CT

Register: https://nnlm.gov/class/resources-k-12-health-science-education/6792

Did you know that the National Library of Medicine has K-12 lesson plans, a resource page and twitter feed for K-12 educators, and sites designed specifically for children and teens? If you would like to learn more about these health and science resources, join us for our webinar on Wednesday, February 22. Annette Parde-Maass, MCR Education and Nebraska Outreach Coordinator, will walk through the resources, give examples on how they could be used, and ask participants to brainstorm and share additional purposes applicable to their own settings.

 

Breezing Along with the RML  

Topic: Instructional Design

Wednesday, March 15, 2017, 10 am MT/ 11 am CT

Register: https://nnlm.gov/class/instructional-design/7089

Do you want to make your classes and presentations more effective and engaging? Do you want to offer learning experiences that really matter? If so, then the NNLM MCR has a great session on instructional design (ID) to get you started with not one, not two, but three experts. ID is a model to help you determine why the training is needed, design your instructional strategy, develop materials, decide how the content will be delivered to learners, and determine if you met your expected results.  Participants will receive instruction on key elements that comprise the ID framework, practice those elements in problem-based virtual breakout groups, and then share the results with fellow virtual attendees.

Presenters: Lisha Bustos, Lead Instructional Designer, University of Colorado; Christine Mousavi Cook, eLearning & Instructional Design Professional, University of Colorado; Michael Kanzanjian, Instructional Design Professional, ECHO Colorado

 

NNLM Resource Picks: How to Make the Most of Your National Library of Medicine Traveling Banner Exhibition! 

Wednesday, March 29, 2017, 1 pm MT/ 2 pm CT

Register: https://nnlm.gov/class/how-make-most-your-national-library-medicine-traveling-banner-exhibition/277

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) provides traveling exhibitions about the social and cultural history of medicine.  In 2016, the Pacific Northwest Regional Medical Library hosted a national questionnaire asking librarians what they would like to learn about hosting one of these exhibitions. Over 250 librarians responded with questions and ideas. This webinar is shaped by their responses. Join us to learn what your colleagues are doing to reach new audiences using NLM traveling exhibitions.

Presenters: Patricia Touhy, National Library of Medicine; Jennifer Butler Keeton, Florence-Lauderdale Public Library; Eva Sclipa, Alfred University; Thomas Lawrence Long, University of Connecticut; Donna Smith, Palm Beach County Library System; Nicole Hughes, Palm Beach County Library System

 

Courses for the Consumer Health Information Specialization:

The Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) provides additional expertise in the area of consumer health and keeps you current on relevant issues in the field. NNLM provides free classes for CE credit towards this specialization. Here are a few upcoming online courses:

For more information on CHIS CE requirements: http://www.mlanet.org/p/cm/ld/fid=329

For information on MCR funding to cover CHIS certificate application: https://nnlm.gov/mcr/funding/consumer-health-information-specialization-chis-certification-funding

Annette Parde-Maass
Nebraska Outreach Coordinator
National Network of Libraries of Medicine/MidContinental Region
AnnetteParde-Maass@creighton.edu
402.280.4156

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Friday Reads: The House of the Spirits

I first read Isabel Allende’s The House of the Spirits my junior year of high school.  At the time, I was taken with the elements of magical realism that permeated the story. In the twenty years since, I have lost track of the number of times I have read this book.  Each time, I gain new insight into this complex, multi-generational novel.

Set in Chile, against the backdrop of social and political upheaval, Allende focuses on the ever-changing fortunes of Esteban Trueba, his wife, Clara del Valle and their children: Blanca, Jaime and Nicolas. While Esteban concentrates on accumulating wealth and power, Clara endeavors to strengthen her clairvoyant talents.  Since childhood, Clara has been able to move objects and predict future events, such as the deaths of her older sister and parents. Although Clara cares for her husband, she leads an independent life because she abhors his conservative values.  Following their mother’s lead, the children, and later Esteban’s green-haired granddaughter, become swept of up in the socialist revolution and  subsequent military coup.

Despite its dark themes, The House of the Spirit is a story of hope and survival.  Allende’s characters often experience the worst, but retain an innate sense of right and wrong.  Until the bitter end, they continue to believe in the basic goodness of mankind.  The last time I read The House of the Spirits, I realized that despite the horrors she had just experienced, Esteban’s granddaughter continues to hope for a better tomorrow. Following her imprisonment, she encounters a woman whose spirit remains strong regardless of efforts to destroy it. Alba, whose name is Spanish for dawn, knows the conservative regime will end and life in Chile will improve for everyone.

Allende, Isabel. The House of the Spirits. Translated by Magda Bogin. New York:  Alfred A. Knopf, 1985.

Posted in Books & Reading | Tagged | 1 Comment

NCompass Live: Metadata Makeover: Transforming Omaha Public Library’s Digital Collections

Join us for the next NCompass Live, ‘Metadata Makeover: Transforming Omaha Public Library’s Digital Collections’, on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 10:00am – 11:00am CT.

In 1998 Omaha Public Library created its first online digital library to showcase its extensive collection of original photographs and documents from the 1898 Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, Omaha’s own world’s fair. Another digitization project was undertaken in 2004. A decade later it was only too evident that the entire digital library, with its hodgepodge of different interfaces and metadata standards, needed to be dragged into the 21st century. We did it—despite minimal staff, minimal training, and minimal time! Come hear this saga of the good, the bad, and the ugly, and what we learned from it.

Presenter: Martha Grenzeback, Omaha Public Library; Mary Marchio, retired.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • March 1 – Project Outcome: Measuring the True Impact of Public Libraries
  • March 8 – Planning for Successful Internships
  • March 15 – Build a Better World: Summer Reading Program 2017

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Register today for Big Talk From Small Libraries 2017

Next Friday, February 24 is Big Talk From Small Libraries 2017!

This FREE one-day online conference is aimed at librarians from small libraries; the smaller the better! Each of our speakers is from a small library or directly works with small libraries. But, everyone is welcome and encouraged to register and attend, regardless of how big or small your library.

Topics range from technology (new and old tech) to programming to new roles for the library. This event is a great opportunity to learn about the innovative things your colleagues are doing in their small libraries.

Check out the full schedule and register today!

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Throwback Thursday: Masonic Temple, Broken Bow, Nebraska.

Postcard of Masonic Temple, Broken Bow, Nebraska.  Approximate date early 1900’s.

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The Public Library Survey is due Friday, Feb. 17, 2017

SurveyIt’s crunch time for the annual IMLS public library survey (submitted via Bibliostat). The survey deadline is February 17, 2017. Completion of the survey is required for your library to receive state aid if you are accredited. If you aren’t accredited, you still have an incentive to complete the survey ($200), called Dollar$ for Data.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions, and thank you in advance for your participation.

Posted in General, Library Management, Uncategorized | Leave a comment