Category Archives: Education & Training

A History of the Census in the United States : Part 9

The Ninth Census: Census Day was June 1, 1870.

Ulysses S. Grant was President of the United States on Census Day, June 1, 1870.

Authorizing Legislation

The 1870 Census was conducted under the authority of the Census Act of 1850. A new law, approved on May 6, 1870, called for two procedural changes: The marshals were to submit the returns from the population questionnaire to the Census Office by September 10, 1870; all other questionnaires were due by October 1, 1870. Additionally, penalties for refusing to reply to enumerator inquiries were expanded to cover all questions asked on all questionnaires.

Enumeration

The Census Office, and the position of superintending clerk were abolished in May 1865. A portion of the clerks engaged in census work transferred to the General Land Office, where work of the 1860 census was completed under the direction of the commissioner of the General Land Office

After the Civil War, the decennial census questionnaires were reordered and redesigned to account for end of the “slave questionnaire.” The schedules for the 1870 census were: “General Population,” “Mortality,” “Agriculture,” “Products of Industry,” and “Social Statistics.”

The secretary of interior selected General Francis A. Walker as superintendent of the ninth census on February 7, 1870. At the time of his appointment General Walker was chief of the Bureau of Statistics – an agency within the Treasury Department – and was one of several experts who had participated in the U.S. House of Representatives’ committee deliberations on the 1870 census. A capable administrator, Walker introduced examinations to test the qualifications of those applying for positions with the Census Office. Walker remained as superintendent until November 1871, when Congress’s failure to appropriate funds for his salary caused him to resign. Nevertheless, he continued overseeing census work as commissioner of Indian Affairs. Later, he resumed his duties as superintendent of the census, working without compensation.

The 1870 enumeration was completed by August 23, 1871.

Technological Advancement

By 1870, the job of tallying and tabulating questionnaire responses was becoming overly burdensome for the Census Office. This problem was partially alleviated with the use of a rudimentary tallying machine, invented by the chief clerk of the Census Office, and later superintendent, Charles W. Seaton.

Further Information

Information provided from Census.gov

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A History of the Census in the United States : Part 8

The Eighth Census: Census Day was June 1, 1860.

James Buchanan was President of the United States on Census Day, June 1, 1860.

Authorizing Legislation

The 1850 Census Act was the authorizing legislation for the 1860 census. That act had stipulated that, according to the recommendation of the secretary of the interior, its provisions were to be adhered to for all future decennial censuses if no new authorizing legislation was passed by January 1 of the year in which the census was required.

Intercensal Activity

The Census Office, and the position of superintending clerk were abolished in May 1865. A portion of the clerks engaged in census work transferred to the General Land Office, where work of the 1860 census was completed under the direction of the commissioner of the General Land Office

Further Information

Information provided from Census.gov

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A History of the Census in the United States : Part 7

The Seventh Census: Census Day was June 1, 1850.

Zachary Taylor was President of the United States on Census Day, June 1, 1850.

Authorizing Legislation

The Census Act of 1840 (signed into law on March 3, 1839 and amended by an act of February 26, 1840) authorized establishing a centralized census office during each enumeration. Congress left the design of the questionnaire to the discretion of the secretary of state, but specified that inquiries be made of each household. Subjects among the inquiries were to include “the pursuits, industry, education, and resources of the country.” New population inquiries included questions about school attendance, literacy, and vocation. In March 1849, Congress enacted a bill establishing a census board whose membership consisted of the secretary of state, the attorney general, and the postmaster general. The law authorized this board to prepare and cause to be printed such forms and schedules as may be necessary for the full enumeration of the inhabitants of the United States; it also authorized the board to prepare forms and schedules for collecting information on mines, agriculture, commerce, manufactures, education, and other topics, as well as “exhibit a full view of the pursuits, industry, education, and resources of the country.”

The seventh census was governed by the provisions of an act of May 23, 1850 that directed that six schedules be used to collect the information requested by the Congress. The act directed enumerators to return their results to the secretary of the interior by November 1, 1850.

Enumeration

The number of population inquiries grew in the 1850 census. Every free person’s name was to be listed, not just the head of the household. The marshals also collected additional “social statistics,” including information on taxes, schools, crime, wages, value of the estate, etc. and data on mortality.

Each marshal was also responsible for subdividing his district into “known civil divisions,” such as counties, townships, or wards, and ensuring that his assistants’ returns were completed properly.

Further Information

Information provided from Census.gov

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Computers in Libraries 2020 Conference (March 31 – April 2)

The Nebraska Library Commission is offering a group discount to all Nebraska librarians who attend the Computers in Libraries 2020 conference. This year it will be held at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Arlington, VA, on March 31st through April 2nd, 2020. Detailed information about the conference can be found on the conference web page.

This year the Gold Pass will be available for the group rate of $629 (regular rate is $819). The Full 3-day Pass will be $359 (regular rate is $519). (No discount rates are available for the preconference workshops, unless purchased as part of a Gold Pass.)

In addition, discount prices of $599 (regular $719) on the Library Leaders Summit (includes all three days of CIL), and $149 (regularly $219) on the Internet@Schools Track are also available.

To receive the discount:

  1. Go to the Computers in Libraries 2020 Registration page:
    http://computersinlibraries.infotoday.com/2020/Registration.aspx
  2. Click on the Register Now graphic at the top of the page.
  3. Type priority code NLC20 in the Priority Code field at the top of the form, and click the “Activate Code” button. Discounted rates should appear on the registration form after you successfully activate the code. If you don’t see the discounted rates on the form, please contact Susan Knisely for assistance.
  4. Complete and submit the online form by the February 28th deadline.

Deadline: Online registrations can be made until February 28th to receive the discounted rates. After this time, rates will go up by $20.

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NCompass Live: Librarian in Training – For Kids!

Learn how to inspire the next generation of library employees with ‘Librarian in Training – For Kids!’ on next week’s FREE NCompass Live webinar on Wednesday, December 11, 10:00am-11:00am CT.

In this session we will describe our Librarian In Training program. LIT is a 14 week program that invites kids between the ages of 9-12 to discover how libraries work, culminating in a celebration of the children’s dedication and service. LIT participants spend two weeks in every department of the library from circulation to maintenance, first meeting staff and discovering how each department operates, then completing a related project or assisting with specific tasks. LIT takes children beyond traditional job shadowing and allows them to contribute in a meaningful way to our library’s work.

Presenter: Jennifer Johnson, School Age Program Coordinator, Johnson City (TN) Public Library.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Dec. 18 – Advocates of All Ages: Recruiting and Retaining Younger Generations as Trustees and Friends
  • Tuesday, Dec. 24 – Pretty Sweet Tech – Watch Me Build a Virtual World Using A-Frame
  • Tuesday, Dec. 31 – Summer Reading Program 2020: Imagine Your Story
  • Jan. 8, 2020 – Rescheduled due to technical issues – United for Libraries – Trustees, Advocates, Friends, and Foundations: The Voice for America’s Libraries
  • Jan. 15, 2020 – Best New Children’s Books of 2019: Discovering New Books for the Young and the Young at Heart
  • Jan. 22, 2020 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Jan. 29, 2020 – Community Engagement: Straight Talk
  • Feb. 5, 2020 – Best New Teen Reads of 2019

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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CE Grants deadline extended! Now open to library science students!

The deadline to apply for this year’s CE Grants has been extended to January 17, 2020! This is an awesome opportunity to attend an out-of-state but nearby conference focused on rural and small libraries!

Applications for CE Grants to attend the ARSL 2020 conference are also now open to library science students! Applications are still open to those employed in an accredited public library and board members! Please see details in the links below.

This year, the Nebraska Library Commission is offering individuals $500 grants to attend the annual Association for Rural & Small Libraries (ARSL) 2020 Conference in Wichita, Kansas (Sept. 30th to Oct. 3rd)! Funding could go towards the cost of travel, hotel, meals, and/or registration costs.

CE grants are open to applicants who are either 1) currently employed in an accredited Nebraska public library at the time of application and for the duration of the conference, 2) a current board member of an accredited Nebraska public library at the time of application and for the duration of the conference, or 3) a student enrolled in a certificate or degree program with a concentration in library and information science or school library media at an accredited college or university for Fall 2020.

More details about the grant requirements, along with the application forms can be found in the links below.

If you have any questions, please contact Holli Duggan, CE Coordinator.

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CCC Library Information Services Classes

Central Community College announces classes for the Library and Information Services program for Spring 2020. Registration opens Nov. 14, 2019. There are six classes in the online program, which can be applied to a CCC Associate Degree.  See details of classes and registration information at:  http://www.cccneb.edu/library/

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NCompass Live: Libraries and the LGBT+ Experience

Learn how your library can be more welcoming through the experiences of the Olean Public and Cuba Circulating Libraries on next week’s FREE NCompass Live webinar, ‘Libraries and the LGBT+ Experience’ on Wednesday, December 4, 10:00am-11:00am CT.

These organizations are creating a more welcoming environment for the LGBTQIA community with programs, resources, and staff training.

Presenters: Tina Dalton, Library Director, Cuba (NY) Circulating Library, and Jennifer Stickles, Manager, Salamanca (NY) Public Library.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Dec. 11 – Librarian in Training – For Kids!
  • Dec. 18 – Advocates of All Ages: Recruiting and Retaining Younger Generations as Trustees and Friends
  • Tuesday, Dec. 24 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Tuesday, Dec. 31 – Summer Reading Program 2020: Imagine Your Story
  • Jan. 8, 2020 – Rescheduled due to technical issues – United for Libraries – Trustees, Advocates, Friends, and Foundations: The Voice for America’s Libraries

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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NCompass Live: Pretty Sweet Tech – Design Thinking: How Technology is Made

‘Design Thinking: How Technology is Made’ is the topic of next week’s FREE NCompass Live webinar, on Wednesday, November 27, 10:00am-11:00am CT.

New special monthly episodes of NCompass Live! Join the NLC’s Technology Innovation Librarian, Amanda Sweet, as she guides us through the world of library-related Pretty Sweet Tech.

In recent years we’ve all been hearing more about “design thinking”. Fun fact! It’s not a new process. It’s just problem solving. You probably already use it, but may know it under a different term. The difference is that design thinking puts the user first. That’s right, humans matter in technology design. It’s a novel idea.

This week’s Pretty Sweet Tech aims to de-mystify design thinking and how technology is designed, prototyped and tested. When we know how technology is made, we all have a better chance to choose and use technology more effectively. Here’s a rundown of what this session will cover:

  • What is Design Thinking?
  • Example as it applies to technology design
  • Using Design Thinking to Choose Technology Tools
  • Using Design Thinking to Teach Technology Literacy

Let’s get together and build people-first technology. Make technology mean something.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Dec. 4 – Libraries and the LGBT+ Experience
  • Dec. 11 – Librarian in Training – For Kids!
  • Dec. 18 – Advocates of All Ages: Recruiting and Retaining Younger Generations as Trustees and Friends
  • Tuesday, Dec. 24 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Tuesday, Dec. 31 – Summer Reading Program 2020: Imagine Your Story
  • Jan. 8, 2020 – Rescheduled due to technical issues – United for Libraries – Trustees, Advocates, Friends, and Foundations: The Voice for America’s Libraries

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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#BookFaceFriday – “Small Public Library Management”

There’s nothing like a little Library Science on a #BookFaceFriday!

Did you know the Commission has a collection of library science titles? Our Library Science Collection provides professional and reference materials for Nebraska librarians and library science programs. This includes all librarians and library science students. Checkout period is 4 weeks, and items can be sent through the mail or picked up in person. An especially pertinent title for Nebraska is “Small Public Library Management” by Jane Pearlmutter and Paul Nelson (American Library Association Editions, 2012.)

“Highly recommended to any small public library administrator it will have a permanent place on this reviewer’s nightstand.”Booklist

This week’s #BookFace model is Cathy Hatterman, NLC’s Acquisitions Librarian. Cathy orders books and magazines for the Library of Congress collection, as well as for the Reference collection, and any special orders needed.

Love this #BookFace & reading? Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

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A History of the Census in the United States : Part 6

The Sixth Census: Census Day was June 1, 1840.

Martin Van Buren was President of the United States on Census Day, June 1, 1840.

Authorizing Legislation

The Census Act of 1840 (signed into law on March 3, 1839 and amended by an act of February 26, 1840) authorized establishing a centralized census office during each enumeration. Congress left the design of the questionnaire to the discretion of the secretary of state, but specified that inquiries be made of each household. Subjects among the inquiries were to include “the pursuits, industry, education, and resources of the country.” New population inquiries included questions about school attendance, literacy, and vocation.

Enumeration

The administration of the sixth census was very similar to that of the fifth. Enumeration began on June 1, 1840. Marshals were to receive two copies of the census receipts from enumerators by November 1, 1840, one of which was to be sent to the secretary of state by December 1, 1840.

Further Information

Information provided from Census.gov

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Continuing Education: Eliminating Fines

Eliminating library fines has been getting more and more attention lately.

Chicago recently eliminated late fees and “[t]he number of book returns has since increased 240%” (Forbes, 2019). Denver also announced back in January that they were going fine free and “zeroing out most customers’ existing overdue balances so they can start fresh” (Denver Library, 2019) citing their belief in “free and equal access for all.” Some libraries, like Lincoln City Libraries, are eliminating late fees for youth materials which are “an unnecessary barrier for children who often lack the autonomy or ability to return library materials on time, and for families who cannot afford to pay them” (Lincoln City Libraries, 2019). The idea behind eliminating fines really goes back to increasing access and breaking down barriers for library users. But is this the right move for every library? How do you decide or implement this kind of initiative?

There are many arguments for and against eliminating library fines, but if you’ve been having this discussion in your library or are interested in finding out more, the resources and webinars below should help start your search.

Purple background. Text in lower right corner "To fine or not to fine?" light green bottom border with text "Eliminating library fines." Left side of image alternating icons of coins and books.

Resources:

Webinars:

  • Upcoming Nov. 20th – “Eliminating Fines: A win-win for your library and community” (Infopeople)
    • “You will hear how eliminating fines can lead to an increase in library use and circulation, with no negative effects.”
  • Recorded – “NCompass Live: Eliminating Late Fines is a Win-Win for Your Library and Community” (NLC)
    • “In this session, Beth [Crist] and Meg [DePriest] will review the research and results from the growing number of libraries across the country that have ditched late fines and coaxed new and former users to their doors. They will share talking points, tips, and an advocacy tool you can use to build a case to eliminate fines in your library.”
  • Recorded – “Fine-Free Future” (RIPL)
    • “This webinar brings together three experienced library directors who have recently eliminated some or all overdue fines at their libraries to discuss the strategies they used in their communities, the arguments for and against the elimination of fines, their plans to measure impact and success, and how they communicate the issue of overdue fines as critical to any library’s mission of equal access and social equity.”
  • Recorded – “Planning and Implementing a Fine-Free Policy” (Florida Library Webinars)
    • “Libraries are ready for a change! Our academic library went fine free in 2016, and we’re not alone. In this informative and interactive program, we will share why and how we managed to eliminate most overdue fines, aligning our circulation policies with the needs of our most frequent users…Policies and methods from public libraries will also be included!”

For webinars and CE: If you would like to earn continuing education (CE) credit and are enrolled in the Nebraska Public Librarian Certification program, please submit a “CE Activity Report Form” after each webinar.

If you have any questions about continuing education, please contact Holli Duggan.

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NCompass Live: VoteLibraries 2020 – Thinking About Elections and Libraries Without Being Partisan

Learn how to ‘VoteLibraries 2020 – Thinking About Elections and Libraries Without Being Partisan’  on next week’s FREE NCompass Live webinar on Wednesday, November 20, 10:00am-11:00am CT.

Libraries have a natural non-partisan role to encourage and support civic engagements like voter registration and issue-awareness. For example, EveryLibrary is a sponsoring organization and steering committee member for National Voter Registration Day and is the library coordinating partner for National Disability Voter Registration Week each year. Next year, they plan to relaunch #VoteLibraries2020 to help put non-partisan library issues on the local, state, and federal landscape. In this conversation, EveryLibrary Executive Director John Chrastka will talk about these voter-facing public education campaigns and other activities that they have planned.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Nov. 27 – Pretty Sweet Tech – Design Thinking: How Technology is Made
  • Dec. 4 – Libraries and the LGBT+ Experience
  • Dec. 11 – Librarian in Training – For Kids!
  • Dec. 24 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Dec. 31 – Summer Reading Program 2020: Imagine Your Story

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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A History of the Census in the United States: Part 5

The Fifth Census: Census Day was June 1, 1830.

Andrew Jackson was President of the United States
on Census Day, June 1, 1830.

Authorizing Legislation

President John Q. Adams, in his fourth address to the U.S. Congress on December 28, 1828, recommended starting the census earlier in the year than August 1. He also proposed that the collection of age data be extended from infancy, in intervals of 10 years, “to the utmost boundaries of life.” These changes were incorporated into the census act of March 23, 1830.

Enumeration

As in the previous census, marshals or their assistants visited every dwelling house for enumeration, or, as the law stated, made a personal inquiry of the head of every family in their district. Because of delays in the compilation of the census returns, the filing date was extended to August 1, 1831.

In 1830, enumerators used uniform printed schedules for the first time. In prior censuses, marshals had used whatever paper was available and had designed and bound the sheets themselves. Because federal census clerks did not have to sort through a huge variety of schedules in 1830, they were able to tabulate census results more efficiently.

The 1830 census counted the population only. After the failures of the past two censuses, no attempt was made to collect additional data on manufacturing and industry in the United States.

Further Information

Information provided from Census.gov

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NCompass Live: United for Libraries – Trustees, Advocates, Friends, and Foundations: The Voice for America’s Libraries

Learn how your library can benefit from the resources at ‘United for Libraries – Trustees, Advocates, Friends, and Foundations: The Voice for America’s Libraries’ on next week’s FREE NCompass Live webinar on Wednesday, November 13, 10:00am-11:00am CT.

Beth Nawalinski, executive director of United for Libraries, the Association of Library Trustees, Advocates, Friends and Foundations, a division of the American Library Association, will be joined by 2019-2020 United for Libraries President Peter Pearson, founder/senior consultant of Library Strategies Consulting Group. Beth and Peter will share their ideas about United for Libraries’ mission and vision, and how Nebraska and its libraries can benefit and fully use the resources available through this dynamic ALA division. Learn about Nebraska’s statewide membership, including online trainings that are available free to all Nebraska public libraries. Hear about United for Libraries’ Baker & Taylor Award. Tina Walker, director of Keene Memorial Library in Fremont, NE, will discuss the Friends of Keene Memorial Library’s Baker & Taylor Award-winning project.

Upcoming NCompass Live events:

  • Nov. 20 – VoteLibraries 2020 – Thinking About Elections and Libraries Without Being Partisan
  • Nov. 27 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Dec. 4 – Libraries and the LGBT+ Experience
  • Dec. 11 – Librarian in Training – For Kids!
  • Dec. 24 – Pretty Sweet Tech

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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‘E-rate: What’s New for 2020?’ Recording now available

The recording and presentation slides of the E-rate: What’s New for 2020? online session are now available.

What is E-rate? How do I apply for E-rate? How can my library get its piece of the E-rate pie?

E-rate is a federal program that provides discounts to schools and public libraries on the cost of their Internet Access and Connections to make these services more affordable. This includes Broadband, Fiber, and Wi-Fi Internet access as well as Internal Connections, such as wiring, routers, switches, and other network equipment.

The E-Rate Productivity Center (EPC) is your online portal for all E-rate interactions. With your organizational account you can use EPC to file forms, track your application status, communicate with USAC, and more.

In this workshop, Christa Porter, Nebraska’s State E-rate Coordinator for Public Libraries, will cover the basics of the E-rate program and show you how to access and use your account in EPC to submit your Funding Year 2020 E-rate application.

If you have any questions or need any assistance with your E-rate forms, visit the NLC E-rate webpage or please contact Christa Porter, 800-307-2665, 402-471-3107.

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Resources for Libraries and the 2020 Census

Apply by Nov. 22 for Library Census Equity Fund

The American Library Association (ALA) is accepting applications for Library Census Equity Fund mini-grants until Nov. 22. ALA will provide 25 libraries with $2,000 mini-grants to bolster their service to hard-to-count communities and help achieve a complete count in the 2020 Census.

Census hiring: Nov. 6 webinar and new tip sheet

The U.S. Census Bureau is currently hiring 500,000 temporary workers for the 2020 Census through an online application process. To achieve a complete count in the 2020 Census, the Census Bureau needs to recruit qualified and diverse applicants in every part of the country. To learn how libraries can promote awareness of 2020 Census job opportunities, register for ALA’s free webinar on Nov. 6 and read ALA’s new tip sheet, “How Can My Library Increase Awareness of 2020 Census Hiring?” (PDF).

Preparing your library for the Census: Nov. 14 webinar and new tip sheet

With the 2020 Census just a few months away, how can libraries prepare, and what funding sources may be available to support libraries’ preparations and activities? Learn more at ALA’s free webinar on Nov. 14 and read ALA’s new tip sheet, “Preparing My Library for the 2020 Census” (PDF).

Trustees invited to become Library Census Champions

Library Census Champions is a new network of state, local and tribal library Trustees helping their libraries and communities prepare for the 2020 Census. Elected and appointed library Trustees can sign up to become a Library Census Champion and receive free information, resources, and actions to take to ensure a fair and accurate census. To learn more about this program, Register to watch the recording on-demand.

Census resources from ALACheck ala.org/census for updates through the 2020 Census as ALA continues to add new resources. For instance, find Libraries Transform images, template presentation slides (PPTX) and presenter notes (PDF)

Upcoming events

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Continuing Education Grants!

Start planning ahead early and apply! This year, the Nebraska Library Commission is offering individuals $500 grants to attend the annual Association for Rural & Small Libraries (ARSL) 2020 Conference in Wichita, Kansas (Sept. 30th to Oct. 3rd)! Funding could go towards the cost of travel, hotel, meals, and/or registration costs.

text right side "CE Grants ARSL 2020 Kansas" text left side "due 12/13/19" link below nlc.nebraska.gov/grants/ce all on a red background

This is an awesome opportunity to attend an out-of-state (but nearby) conference focused on rural and small libraries! Details about the grant, along with the application forms can be found in the links below. Applications are due by December 13, 2019!

ARSL logo: tree with green and blue leaves, text "The association for rural and small libraries" link below arsl.info

The purpose of these grants is to assist Nebraska libraries to improve the library services provided to their communities through continuing education and training for their library personnel and supporters. CE grants are open to applicants who are either 1) currently employed in an accredited Nebraska public library at the time of application and for the duration of the conference or a 2) current board member of an accredited Nebraska public library at the time of application and for the duration of the conference.

If you have any questions, please contact Holli Duggan, CE Coordinator.

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A History of the Census in the United States: Part 4

The Fourth Census: Census Day was August 7, 1820.

James Monroe was President of the United States
on Census Day, August 7, 1820.

Authorizing Legislation

The fourth census was taken in accordance with the census act of March 14, 1820, which required more detailed population-related inquiries than earlier enumerations. This census is notable for being the first to inquire if respondents were engaged in agriculture, commerce, or manufacturing.

Enumeration

The enumeration began on the first Monday of August. Its scheduled six-month completion time frame was extended by about seven months to September 1, 1821. As in previous decades, the 1820 census act again required assistant marshals to visit every dwelling house, or head of every family within their designated districts.

Data relating to manufacturing were collected by assistants in each district, sent to the marshals, and then transmitted to the secretary of state along with the population returns. The report on manufacturing presented the data for these establishments by counties, but the results were not summarized for each district and the aggregate statement that was released was based on incomplete returns. The 1820 manufacturing census suffers the same criticism as that in 1810: Poor enumerator training resulted in dramatic variations in data quality and accuracy.

Further Information

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November is Native American Heritage Month

November is National American Indian Heritage MonthThe Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the rich ancestry and traditions of Native Americans.

Visit the National American Indian Heritage Month website to view a Calendar of Events, Exhibits and Collections, Audio and Video, Resources for Teachers, Images, and much more!

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