Category Archives: Nebraska Memories

Throwback Thursday: Prince Wilhelm of Sweden

We’ve got a royal #ThrowbackThursday for you!

This black and white photo was taken on May 12, 1927. It shows Prince Wilhelm of Sweden (front left) during his visit to the Immanuel Deaconess Institute. Those pictured with him are other Swedish dignitaries, people connected with the institute, and detectives.

This photo is part of the Alegent Health Immanuel Medical Center collection on the Nebraska Memories archive. The rich and well documented history of Immanuel Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska is shown in these images of the early buildings, people and artifacts.

Interested in Nebraska history? Check out this collection and more on the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Throwback Thursday: Lincoln Statue

Happy #ThrowbackThursday from Nebraska Memories!

This week, we have an 8″x10″ glass plate negative of the bronze statue that sits outside of the Nebraska State Capitol building. Shown in profile, this statue of Abraham Lincoln stands on a granite pedestal and behind it, carved into the granite wall, is the Gettysburg Address.

This statue was dedicated in a ceremony on September 12, 1912 and predates the current capitol building. The statue is located on the west side of the building.

This photo is part of the Townsend Studio collection on the Nebraska Memories archive. The studio holds a collection of glass plate and acetate negatives of early Lincoln and early residents.

Interested in Nebraska history? Find out more about this photo in the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Throwback Thursday: Baseball Game

The College World Series kicks off this weekend and we’re celebrating with this week’s #ThrowbackThursday!

This week’s black and white photograph is provided and owned by History Nebraska. Check out more digitized content from this collection and many more on the Nebraska Memories archive.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Throwback Thursday: Chief James Red Cloud

Happy #ThrowbackThursday from Nebraska Memories!

This 8″x10″ glass plate negative is from 1934. It features Chief Red Cloud’s grandson James as he stands on steps of Nebraska’s State Capitol. He is pictured wearing beaded clothing and a full feather headdress.

This picture is part of the Townsend Studio collection. Check out materials in this collection and many more on the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Throwback Thursday: Bookmobile at School District 32

Happy #ThrowbackThursday from Nebraska Memories!

This week we have a 4-1/8″ x 2-1/2″ black and white photograph of the Nebraska Public Library Commission’s bookmobile from 1937.

This picture is provided and owned by the Nebraska Library Commission. The collection includes materials on the history of libraries in the state of Nebraska, mainly libraries built with Carnegie grants. This collection  also includes items showcasing the history of Nebraska’s state institutions.

Interested in Nebraska history? Find out more about this photo in the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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ThrowbackThursday: “Little Gold Star”

NLC remembers those who died in service to our country with this week’s #ThrowbackThursday.

This week we have sheet music of World War I. “Little Gold Star” was written by Will M. Maupin and J. A. Parks, who was an internationally famous Nebraska composer and publisher.

“O little gold star on your field of white!

Your hero has paid the price;

God comfort the hearts that are sad tonight

With the thought of his sacrifice.

O little gold star in your border’d red,

You gleam for a world made free,

For the choice he made, and the price he paid

For the world and its liberty!”

 

If you’d like to hear a recording of this piece, click here.

This piece is owned and provided by Polley Music Library. Just over two hundred fifty pieces of Nebraska sheet music are available through the Nebraska Memories databases, as well as concert programs, manuscripts, theatre programs, photographs, and other Nebraska memorabilia which features an element of music. Searchers can also listen to a dozen performances of selections from this music collection performed by local musicians.

Interested in Nebraska history? Find out more about this photo in the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Throwback Thursday: Lincoln Fire Department

Check out this week’s #ThrowbackThursday from the Nebraska Memories archive.

This 8″x10″ glass plate negative shows the interior view of a Lincoln Fire Department around the early 1900s. Harnesses are suspended from the ceiling and hooked up to two wagons in order for the horses to be quickly hitched up.

This photo is courtesy of Townsend Studio. Townsend studio has been in continuous operation since it was founded in Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1888 by Timothy Townsend with his sons, Alva C. and Charles. The studio holds a collection of glass plate and acetate negatives of early Lincoln and early residents including General John J. Pershing, William Jennings Bryan and Mari Sandoz; images also include University of Nebraska and high school sports teams, state governors and Lincoln Mayors.

Interested in Nebraska history? Find out more about this photo in the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Throwback Thursday

All smiles for this week’s #ThrowbackThursday!

This week’s photos are courtesy of The Durham Museum.
Check out this collection and many more on the Nebraska Memories archive.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see
http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Throwback Thursday: Graduation

Happy #ThrowbackThursday from the Nebraska Memories archive!

For some, the month of May marks an important milestone – graduation! Congratulations to all who are graduating this year and best wishes for your next adventure!

This black and white photograph shows three Union College graduates sitting on the ground with their diplomas behind them.

This photo is provided and owned by the Union College, Ella Johnson Crandall Memorial Library. The photographs selected for inclusion in Nebraska Memories include early scenes of the Union College campus and downtown College View.

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books, and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Throwback Thursday: Balloon School

Did you know that there used to be a balloon school in Nebraska?

This black and white lantern slide shows the balloon house at Fort Omaha. During World War I, Fort Omaha became the nation’s center for balloon training. Balloonists were trained in map reading and charting troop movements.

This week’s #ThrowbackThursday photo is provided and owned by the Omaha Public Library. The items from the Omaha Public Library in Nebraska Memories include early Omaha-related maps dating from 1825 to 1922, as well as over 1,100 postcards and photographs of the Omaha area.

Interested in Nebraska history? Check out the Nebraska Memories archive.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Throwback Thursday: Easter Egg Hunt

This Sunday is Easter and for a lot of people that means celebrating with an Easter egg hunt!

This black and white photo shows about a dozen children and several adult volunteers standing in a park near the Nebraska Children’s Home Society located in Omaha.

This photograph is from Nebraska Children’s Home Society collection on the Nebraska Memories archive.

Interested in Nebraska history? Visit the Nebraska Memories archive to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Throwback Thursday: Queen of the College World Series

Check out this week’s #ThrowbackThursday from the Nebraska Memories Archive.

Crowning of Dorothy Gredstrom as School of Nursing Seniors Queen of the College World Series

This black and white photograph shows Dorothy Gredstrom being crowned the School of Nursing Seniors Queen of the College World Series in June of 1959. From 1950 through 1991, the College World Series included CWS “Sweethearts.” Nine young women were selected to represent area service clubs, colleges, universities, etc. Omaha sports writers and sportscasters then picked one to be the CWS Queen. In this photo we see Edward F. Pettis, a man instrumental in the early development of the College World Series, crowning Dorothy with a crown of flowers. 1959 was the thirteenth year of the CWS, the tournament’s champion was Oklahoma State, coached by Toby Greene.

This photograph was provided and is owned by the Alegent Health Immanuel Medical Center. An archive of thousands of photos, papers and items has been maintained for over 120 years, carefully stored and currently housed at the Alegent Health Immanuel Medical Center campus. With the assistance of the Nebraska Library Commission, this sampling of items from the Immanuel collection has been made available through the efforts of the Fall 2008 and Fall 2010 Advanced Cataloging class at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, under the guidance and direction of the instructor, Corinne Jacox, and Karen Hein of the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Interested in Nebraska history? Find out more about this photo in the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Seed Companies

A few weeks ago, I had a conversation with a librarian about old seed catalogs. I must admit that before the conversation I’d never thought about seed companies or their catalogs. I’d seen photos of seed companies in Nebraska Memories and I thought their main business would have been selling corn, wheat or other seeds that farmers needed along with some basic seeds for the garden.

Because of that conversation, I found the US Department of Agricultural Library’s Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection. The collection contains over 200,000 items and currently 41,683 of them have been digitized and made available through the Internet Archives. In the digitized collection, I found 644 seed catalogs or price lists from Nebraska including items for all three seed stores pictured in Nebraska Griswold Seed and Nursery Company Memories. After looking at these catalogs, I realized that these seed companies sold a lot more than seed corn. Let me share with you what I learned about these three stores.

Griswold Seed and Nursery Company

This photo from 1928 is of the Griswold Seed and Nursery Company’s elevator and warehouse. This warehouse was built in 1910 at the corner of 8th and N Street in downtown Lincoln. In 1994, the building was sold to the Midwest Steel Company. As you can see in Google Street View, the building is still being used today.

1916 Griswold catalogI found 27 catalogs from the Griswold Company in the US Dept. of Ag collection. Looking through the catalogs, I learned that the company was started in 1891. The image to the left is from the 1916 catalog and shows the elevator and warehouse and their retail store that was located at 147 S 10th St. If you are familiar with Lincoln, this is the address of the parking lot next to the Terminal Building. On this same page of the catalog, they Griswold Seed & Nursery Co. Spring 1928 catalogmention that their name is now Griswold Seed & Nursery Co. Previously it was just the Griswold Seed Co.

The photo of the Griswold elevator and warehouse was taken in 1928 so I looked at the Griswold Seed & Nursery Co. Spring 1928 catalog. The catalog has 92 pages. The front cover shows a couple of varieties of apples and berries. Looking at the index, I’m guessing there are over 400 items listed including a variety of flowers, vegetables, trees and bushes. I checked and they did sell field corn, wheat and sugar beets.

Gunn Seed Company View 1 and View 2

Gunn Seed Company, view 2The Gunn Seed Company was located at 219 S. 10th Street in Lincoln. This was just down the block from the Griswold retail store. That location is also currently a parking lot. If you take the time to look at the photos of the Gunn Seed Company, it is obvious that they sell a variety of items. The smaller sign above the door says Gunn Seed Co. Poultry Supplies. The larger sign mentions Field, Garden, Flower Seeds on one side and Poultry Supplies / Garden Tools on other. On the sidewalk in front of the store is a collection of plants, gardening tools and bags of feed.

 Gunn Seed Company, view 1There are 10 documents from the Gunn Seed Company included in the US Dept. of Ag collection. Like the Griswold Seed Company, Gunn sold a variety of vegetable and flower seeds. They also offered a wide variety of poultry supplies.

Both photos of the Gunn Seed Company were taken in 1916. Their first catalog available in the collection Gunn's new catalog - 1927is from 1919. I’m not sure when the Gunn store first opened. I looked in the 1908 city directory and did not find the Gunn Seed store listed but I did find an entry for Gunn, Edwin S. who was listed as the “mngr retail dept Griswold Seed Co.”. I looked through all of the Gunn seed catalogs and in every one of them is a picture of Ed. S. Gunn. My guess is that Edwin left Griswold Seed and started his own company but I wasn’t able to find any documentation that confirmed this.

C.P. Coy & Co. seed house

 C.P. Coy & Co. seed houseThis photo of the C. P. Coy & Co. building located in Valley was taken around 1910. We don’t know the exact date of the photo was taken. We do know that it was built in 1903. My search of the US Dept. of Ag’s collection for Coy was successful as I found 16 different seed price lists. As I started looking at them, I realized there were two companies with similar names. There were seven prices lists from Chauncey P. Coy and Son. This name matches the name on side of the building. The dates of the price lists range from 1901 to 1926. The address listed on all of these price lists is Waterloo, NE however. The two names listed in the 1902 booklet were C. P. Coy and H. G. Coy.

The other nine price lists are from the C. Herbert Coy Seed Co. of Valley. They range from 1916 to 1926. The 1915 catalog has a picture of the same building that is in Nebraska Memories. The name on the building is now C. Herbert Coy Seed Co.The C. Herbert Coy Seed Company - 1915

At first, I thought C. Herbert might be the son but the names didn’t match up. I found more information about C. Herbert in the 1917 book Omaha: The Gate City, and Douglas County, Nebraska, Volume 2. In the short bio about him, it states that he moved to Valley from New York in 1901 to start his company. There is no reference to him having family in Waterloo. According to a family tree created by a distant Coy relative that I found in the MyHeritage Library Edition database Chauncey P. Coy would have been Charles Herbert Coy’s uncle.

Both the Coy companies were wholesale seed growers. Their price sheets were set up to sell seed by the pound. They offered a limited selection of seeds including cucumbers, melons, gourds, and corn.

I hope you enjoyed learning a little bit about these three seed companies. Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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Past Legislators

Thomas WolfeWith the 2018 Primary Elections being held last week I thought it would be a good time to highlight a few former legislators whose photos are included in Nebraska Memories. When Nebraska became a state in 1867 it had both a Senate and House of Representatives. The four men whose photos appear in Nebraska Memories were all members of Nebraska’s House of Representatives.

Thomas Wolfe (1877-1879)

Thomas Wolfe was born  Madessa, Lionel and Thomas Wolfe, Jr.in Germany in 1847. His family moved to Wisconsin shortly after his birth. He worked at a variety of newspapers including the Tribune in Chicago, the Evening Thomas Jr. and Madessa WolfePost in New York, the Republican and the Bee in Omaha, and the Nebraska Reporter in Seward. In 1877 became president of the Butler County bank in David City.

Thomas Wolfe was a member of the Nebraska House of Representatives from 1877 to 1879 representing Seward County. Thomas also served as the president of the Nebraska Press Association from 1879-1880. Thomas and his wife Madessa had three children Leonel, Thomas Jr. and Medessa.

Matt Miller (1885-1889)

Matt MillerMat Miller was born in Scotland in 1850. He immigrated with his family to Wisconsin when he was two years old. Both of his parents died when he was eight leaving him and his three siblings as orphans. At the page of 14, Matt ran away an Matt Millerd enlisted in the Union Army. He was discharged in 1866 and after completing high school and graduating commercial college, he moved to Burt County Nebraska.

In 1879, Matt and his first wife Sarah moved to Schuyler and a year later Matt was admitted to the bar. In 1881, he moved to David City and practiced law in town for 42 years. Matt was elected to the House of Representatives and served from 1885 to 1889. Matt also went on to serve as judge for District 5 in Nebraska from 1891-1892.

Michael Delaney (1889-1891 & 1895-1897)

 Michael Delaney and familyMichael Delaney was born in 1843 in New York. When he was two, his parents moved to Wisconsin. He later moved to Iowa where he was a teacher and a farmer. In 1872, he purchased a farm in Butler County Nebraska. In addition to serving as a member of the House or Representatives from 1889-1891 and 1895-1897 Michael held numerous other positions. Some of the positions he held included county superintendent of schools, school director for his district, a member of the Board of Supervisors and Justice of the Peace. Michael and his wife Katherine had seven children.

Henry C. Richmond (1915-1917)

Henry C. Richmond was born in 1870 in Missouri. As a child, his family moved to Kansas and later to Webster County Nebraska. Henry worked at a number of newspapers Henry Richmondincluding the Red Cloud Chief, Omaha World-Herald, and the Fremont Daily Herald. In 1907, he was elected president of the Nebraska Press Association. In 1911 and again in 1913 Henry was elected chief clerk of the Nebraska House of Representatives.

Henry Richmond served as a member of the House of Representatives from 1915-1917 representing Douglas County. Following his term in 1917, he became the secretary for the Nebraska State Council of Defense. Henry passed away in May 1945 in Portland Oregon. According to his obituary, he and his wife Jeannette had two daughters and three grandchildren.

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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Throwback Thursday: United States Liberty Bell Train

Happy #ThrowbackThursday from Nebraska Memories.

With Memorial Day just around the corner, we thought this photograph would be a good way to start the weekend. This 5 X 7, black and white photograph, is a shot of the Liberty Bell on tour through the United States. The photo depicts the bell on a railroad car flanked by two American flags with several military personnel and officials around it. It also shows the crowd of onlookers that came to see the bell. The train stopped in McCook, in July, 1909. The Liberty Bell crossed the country on a number of train journeys to be displayed at special events. This ended in the 1930s when it was determined to be too unsafe to move the bell from place to place.

This photograph was provided and is owned by the High Plains Historical Society. The High Plains Historical Society and Museum and the McCook Public Library worked in partnership to digitize photographic images from the historical society’s collection. These images document early growth of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad in McCook, Nebraska, and the surrounding area. The collection spans a time period from the early 1880s through the 1960s.

Interested in Nebraska history? Find out more about this photo in the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Throwback Thursday: Florence School Bus

Happy #ThrowbackThursday from Nebraska Memories.

As children all over Nebraska are finishing up the school year we thought this throwback to 1931 was perfect. School buses have changed a little in the last 87 years.

This photograph was taken in front of the old Florence Elementary School at 8516 N. 31st Street by Dorothy Edwards, a teacher at the school. The Florence School bus was owned and driven by Sam Smith, shown standing just inside the door at the front of the wagon. The boy in the center carrying a book is Sammy Smith Jr., son of the driver. The tall boy on the far right, also carrying a book, is Billy Gale. His sister, Vivian Gale (Gast) is the curly-haired girl in the back row. Mrs. Gast stated that she and her brother had red hair. Mrs. Gast also stated the bus was painted a dark green with red trim; the door was yellow. The street where this picture was taken is still unpaved. The old Florence school was closed and torn down in the mid 1960s. It was replaced by the current Florence Elementary on N. 36th Street.

Historical materials relating directly to the Omaha Public Schools have been located in various departments and school buildings. Many schools still maintain their own collections. In 2003, staff from the Educational Research Library / Library Services received a small grant to begin collecting and organizing these materials in a central location. This group of pictures and their accompanying stories is but a tiny part of the District’s over 150 year history.

Interested in Nebraska history? Find out more about this photo in the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Friday Reads: Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable

Today I’m writing about a book I’m not done reading yet, because I already know I can recommend it—especially to any Nebraskan who wants to know more than they (might have?) learned in school about Malcolm X.

Manning Marable worked for years on “Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention,” and it’s a book that combines extensive research with skillful storytelling and readability. Marable died shortly before the book was published in 2011. The book went on to win the Pulitzer Prize, and gathered both wide acclaim and bitter detraction.

It was a labor of love for Manning Marable, who was Director of Columbia University’s Institute for Research in African-American Studies (IRAAS), which is responsible for the The Malcolm X Project at Columbia University. Marable takes a more academic, yet still very readable, approach to the life of Malcolm X than the book you might already be familiar with, The Autobiography of Malcolm X, which was a collaboration between X and Alex Haley. If you’re not already familiar with that book, which came out in 1965 shortly after the death of Malcolm X, we have copies in our book club kit collection here, and it’s also recommended. It made the Nebraska 150 Books list.

Marable’s detractors fault him for being perhaps too eager to present details that the autobiography may have glossed over, enhanced, or simply left out. Each book has a different goal, to be sure, and to my mind it seems that the persona that is set forth in the autobiography was one that Marable accepted, and that he knew to be secure and strong in the minds of readers—and so his unexpected explorations are really a testament to his faith in the significance and consequence of Malcolm X as an individual. When you’ve centered so much of your professional life around someone’s legacy, as Marable did, especially when that someone is as complex as Malcolm X, appreciating and acknowledging that complexity is what separates dedication from devotion, or veneration from worship.

I can understand why such honesty might not seem refreshing, however, given the context of the current struggle for racial justice, whether it’s 1965, 2011, or 2018. There are plenty of other voices who can speak to this more eloquently and appropriately than I can. (I already have A Lie of Reinvention: Correcting Manning Marable’s Malcolm X [ed. Ball and Burroughs] checked out to read next, in order to better understand these objections.)

Of particular interest to Nebraskans, Marable’s book gives more context to the Omaha life of the family of Malcolm X than Nebraskans might know, and you’ll read disturbing details of KKK activity in Lincoln and Omaha in the early 1900s. This is a part of Nebraska history you also might not have learned about in school. To put that in some context, we’re coming up on the 100-year anniversary of the Omaha race riot of 1919, where a mob of white people stormed the Douglas County Courthouse and lynched a black man, Will Brown, awaiting trial for a crime he most likely did not commit. The mob also fatally wounded the Omaha mayor, Edward Smith. For more background on the event, see this recent addition to Nebraska Memories, and also this pdf from the Nebraska State Historical Society.

Marable, Manning. Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention. New York: Viking, 2011. Print.

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Scores of Love

Are you still looking for a unique way to express your love to a special someone today? Can you sing, play the piano and/or play the ukulele? If you answered yes, I have a few scores for you. One of the participants in Nebraska Memories is the Polley Music Library. Included in their collection are 256 musical scores. The complete scores are available so if you have the skills you can perform one these love songs for your special someone.

  • Written by Sara S. Green and Frances M. Green of Beatrice, Nebraska.
  • First line of the chorus: “Lovin’ you, that’s all I do”

Let me sail on the ship of love
Let me sail on the ship of love

  • Written by Elsie Butz of Talmage, Nebraska.
  • Chorus:
    “Let me sail on the ship of love,
    And dream the whole time thru,
    Let me sail on the ship of love,
    ‘Way from all trouble too,
    Where there is no cloud or sorrow
    Only ones you have to borrow,
    Let me sail on the ship of love,
    With dreams of love and you.”

Love’s faithLove's faith

  • Written by Edith Louise Neumann and Carleton Everett Knox of Wymore, Neb.
  • First line: “My faith in you clear heart is fixed”

 

 

By the waters of Minnetonka: an Indian love songBy the waters of Minnetonka: an Indian love song

  • The sheet music was written by Thurlow Lieurance who was a facility member at the University School of Music, Lincoln, Nebraska.
  • This version of the song does not including lyrics.
  • You can also listen to this song being played on the piano.

 

Sweet memories of love : a beautiful songSweet memories of love : a beautiful song

  • Written by Louis Chobar while he was serving time in a Nebraska prison for a murder conviction.
  • First line: “Years slowly pass since we parted”
  • This piece includes an arrangement for the ukulele.

 

When you're really and truly in loveWhen you’re really and truly in loveWhen you're really and truly in love

  • Written by Richard Lieurance.
  • First line: “There’s a time in your life when struggle and strife seem to bed each other adieu.”
  • This piece includes an arrangement for the ukulele.

 

Two little songs

  • This score contains two songs, Cupid’s Calendar and Sweetheart.
  • Written by J. A. Parks
  • Here are the lyrics for Cupid’s Calendar:
    “When I’m with you, dearest one, the hours as minutes fly,
    And Love cheats Time so sweetly, that his calendar’s awry;
    But Cupid finds an easy way, to set the time-card true,
    For minutes drag to hours, dear heart, when I’m away from you!”
    Two little songs

 

Happy Valentine’s Day everyone!

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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Beautiful Snow

After the recent snowstorm, I saw many beautiful pictures of the snow. The pictures were taken by both friends and strangers from across Nebraska. Some were taken to show the amount of snow received while others were taken to show nature’s beauty. As I was looking at the images in Nebraska Memories today, I noticed a number of similar images of snow taken 100+ years ago. Here are a few of my favorites.

Beautiful Snow

Beautiful Snow

Cedar River

Cedar River

The first four photos in this post were taken by John Nelson. John Nelson was born in Sweden and moved to Wheeler County Nebraska with his parents when he was a young man. Eventually he opened a photography studio in Ericson Nebraska. While we don’t know the exact dates these photos were taken, we believe they were taken sometime between 1907 and 1918.

The above stereoscopic photograph shows antique farm machinery covered in snow. On the right image, in the bottom left corner, someone wrote “The Beautiful Snow”.

The next photo shows the banks of the Cedar River covered in snow. The Cedar River is a long winding river that starts in northern Nebraska, goes by Ericson, and finally joins the Loup River west of Fullerton, NE.

Snow covered trees and field

Snow covered trees and field

Farmhouse in snow

Farmhouse in snow

The second stereoscopic photograph shows snow covered trees and field. Images like this are timeless. It’s easy to imagine someone taking a photo like this during the last snowstorm.

The fourth picture shows Nels and Bengta Nelson’s farmhouse. They were John Nelson’s parents. The snowdrifts look large and the tracks in the snow look deep.

Clarkson Hospital

Clarkson Hospital

Photos of two other buildings caught my attention. This photo of the Clarkson Hospital in Omaha from the early 1900’s shows a portion of 21st Street in Omaha. The street looks to be snow packed and a little rough. I don’t think it would be a fun street to drive down.

I was surprised when I first saw this postcard of the Nebraska State Capitol in winter. This was the first time I’d seen a postcard of the second capitol with snow on the ground.

State Capitol in winter, Lincoln, Neb.

State Capitol in winter, Lincoln, Neb.

While the capitol may look nice surrounded by snow not everyone was impressed with the building. This postcard was never mailed but someone did write a note on the back. Here are their thoughts on the building. “This is an old “ramshackle” place surrounding by a park as shown in picture.” The person’s description of the building was probably correct. Construction on this capitol was completed in 1888 however, the construction was supposed to have been poor. In 1919, the Legislatures passed a bill providing for the construction of a new capitol that still stands today.

The last three images I would like to highlight are postcards of Hanscom Park in Omaha. Hanscom Park is located about a block west of Interstate 480 and the Martha Street exit. The land for the park was donated in 1872 and was improved in 1889. The park appears to have been a popular spot or at least a popular spot to take photographs. There are 30+ images on Hanscom Park in Nebraska Memories.

Winter scene in Hamscom Park, Omaha, Nebr.

Winter scene in Hamscom Park, Omaha, Nebr.

Winter beauty, Hanscom Park, Omaha, Neb.

Winter beauty, Hanscom Park, Omaha, Neb.

Hanscom Park in winter, Omaha, Nebr.

Hanscom Park in winter, Omaha, Nebr.

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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Throwback Thursday: John Ellis Album

Happy #ThrowbackThursday from Nebraska Memories.

We’re changing it up a little this week to showcase the wide variety of documents in the Nebraska Memories archive. While photographs are visually captivating, Nebraska Memories contains so much more than just photos. Today we have just such an example with a Mr. John Ellis’s autograph album. Containing inscriptions from the 1880’s, take a little time to read through them. We’ve only included a few in this post, but another fifteen are available for your perusal on the Nebraska Memories website. Check them out, there are some really comical and interesting inscriptions!

This 5″ x 3″ autograph album has a cover with a floral design on it. The pages of the album are filled with inscriptions addressed to “John” or “Johnnie.” Some of the inscriptions have dates from years in the 1880s.

Johny Ellis 
Some write for plesure [pleasure]
Some write for fame
But I write simply to sine my name. 
Franklin. C Compton. 
Genoa. Neb. [Nebraska] Feb. [February] 24. 1888

Friend Johnnie
If in this world of grief and pain
My friend..we never meet again
Oh.. my we meet beyond the the skies
Where friendship blooms and never dies
Your well wisher
Lennie[?] Foster
Genoe [Genoa] Neb [Nebraska] Mar [March] 4th 1881

Dec. [December]  18th 1887 
Friend John 
Remember me when far far off
Where the woodchucks die
Of whooping cough.

Yours Truly
John T. Nutcher
Reed Box Butte Co. [County]
Nebr. [Nebraska]

Interested in Nebraska history? Find out more about this photo in the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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