Apply for a United for Libraries Award for Innovation for Friends Groups and Library Foundations

United for Libraries is now accepting applications for the United for Libraries Awards for Innovation sponsored by Baker & Taylor. The award recognizes Friends groups and library Foundations for outstanding efforts to support their library, and recipients will each receive $1,000.

Three groups will be recognized for a specific, outstanding project culminating within the previous 18 months prior to application.

Entries must be received by Sept. 30, 2022.

Applications are judged on the following:

  • Planning: Friends/Foundation, library, and community involvement, use of resources, appropriateness of the activity, and measurable goals and objectives.
  • Implementation: Use of resources, public relations, task monitoring, and broad membership involvement.
  • Evaluation: Assessment of activity or program, measurable results.
  • Innovation: New idea or implementation, creative involvement of people, fresh use of public relations.
  • Community Involvement: Broad support by the community in planning and implementation.
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#BookFaceFriday “Finlay Donovan is Killing It” by Elle Cosimano

We’re knocking ’em dead with this week’s #BookFaceFriday!

Your book club may just die … of laughter with this week’s #BookFaceFriday pick, “Finlay Donovan is Killing It: A Novel” by Elle Cosimano (Minotaur Books, 2021)! Looking for a good “whodunit” for your reading group?

We have several mysteries in our Book Club Kit collection; browse them by selecting “Mystery” in the Genre drop-down menu. You can find this title and all the titles available on our Book Club Kits page. It is also available as an e-book and audiobook on Nebraska Overdrive Libraries, where we also have the second book in the series “Finlay Donovan Knocks ‘Em Dead“.

“Part comedy of errors, part genuine thriller… Deftly balancing genre conventions with sly, tongue-in-cheek comments on motherhood and femininity, Cosimano crafts a deliciously twisted tale.”

Booklist

Book Club Kits Rules for Use

  1. These kits can be checked out by the librarians of Nebraska libraries and media centers.
  2. Circulation times are flexible and will be based upon availability. There is no standard check-out time for book club kits.
  3. Please search the collection to select items you wish to borrow and use the REQUEST THIS KIT icon to borrow items.
  4. Contact the Information Desk at the Library Commission if you have any questions: by phone: 800/307-2665, or by email: Information Services Team

Love this #BookFace & reading? Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

 
 

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New from REALM: Public Health Crisis Management Playbook

The REALM Public Health Crisis Management Playbook for Archives, Libraries, and Museums offers a set of guiding processes, resources, and tools to aid cultural heritage institutions when planning for, navigating through, and recovering from a significant public health emergency. This resource can help archive, library, or museum staff who are part of a crisis management planning or communications team.

This playbook, available online and as a downloadable PDF document, covers the following topics:

  • Crisis leadership—Provides starting points for crisis management and communications planning
  • Facilities and operations—Offers considerations for determining processes for decision-making about collections management, space configuration, building systems, and safety protocols
  • Crisis decision-making and risk management—Overviews risk assessment, information gathering, and decision-making during uncertain times
  • Resource networks—Shares strategies for identifying partners and maintaining collaborative relationships, including a tool for visualizing an institution’s potential partners during a crisis
  • Resources for more information—Provides all resources used to develop the playbook, as well as additional materials that can be used in developing a public health crisis management plan

REopening Archives, Libraries, and Museums (REALM) is a research project conducted by OCLC, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, and Battelle to produce and distribute science-based COVID-19 information that can aid local decision making regarding operations of archives, libraries, and museums.

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Throwback Thursday: Safety Patrol Officers

It’s time for another #ThrowbackThursday from Nebraska Memories!

In this week’s 9 1/2″ x 7 1/2″ black and white photograph, there are four eighth grade students serving as safety patrol officers. They are gathered outside of Jackson School in Omaha, Nebraska with a police officer.

Safety patrol began in 1924. It was a joint effort between Miss Marie Wetzel, Principal at Farnam Street School, the Police Commissioner, and the Omaha Safety Council. The Omaha Police Department provided training for the student crossing guards and issued badges and identity cards. The program started with seven boys at Farnam and grew to include every elementary school in the district. When Farnam Street School closed in 1926, the students attended the new Jackson School. The safety patrol program was the first of its kind and served as a model for other schools across the country.

This week’s image is published and owned by Omaha Public Schools and the Educational Research Library. Historical materials have been located in various departments and school buildings. Many schools still maintain their own collections. In 2003, staff from the Educational Research Library began collecting and organizing these materials in a central location. This collection is a small part of the District’s long history.

Check out this collection and many more on the Nebraska Memories archive.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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NCompass Live: Retirement: Time to Ease on Down, Ease on Down the Road

Are you planning for retirement? We’ll explore why, when, and how to retire on next week’s NCompass Live webinar, ‘Retirement: Time to Ease on Down, Ease on Down the Road’ on Wednesday, September 7 at 10am CT.

Over the course of your career, you spend quite a bit of time planning your professional development, envisioning your career path, and deciding on the degrees or training you need in your professional life. Conversely, how much time do you spend planning a transition away from that life in a healthy, graceful manner? Join us for an exploration of why, when, and how to retire, and hear best practices and wish-I-hadn’ts based on recent retiree’s experiences. We will include transitioning to a fixed income, implementing a succession plan at your library, and adapting to life as a retiree.

Presenter: Robin Newell, Executive Director, Emporia Public Library, KS.

Upcoming NCompass Live shows:

  • Sept. 14 – Building Cultures of Reading with Reader Zone
  • Sept. 21 – Letters About Literature 2022
  • Sept. 28 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Oct. 5 – NO NCOMPASS LIVE THIS WEEK – ENJOY NLA!
  • Oct. 12 – Navigating the New NebraskAccess

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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#BookFaceFriday “Touch” by Olaf Olafsson

You can’t touch this #BookFaceFriday!

We’re leaving on a jet plane, don’t know when we’ll be back again… er well at least we won’t be back in time for #BookFaceFriday! We’re taking a trip with “Touch: A Novel” by Olaf Olafsson (Ecco, 2022.) This Icelandic mystery starts in Reykjavik, but the unreliable narrator will take readers around the world as he searches for a long lost love. This title is available as both an eBook and an Audiobook in Nebraska OverDrive Libraries.

“Olafsson’s treatment of the vast cultural chasm between Icelander Kristófer, and Miko…brings suspense and heartache to the reader.”

Library Journal

Find this title and many more through Nebraska OverDrive! Libraries participating in the Nebraska OverDrive Libraries Group currently have access to a shared and growing collection of digital downloadable audiobooks and eBooks. 188 libraries across the state share the Nebraska OverDrive collection of 21,696 audiobooks, 35,200 eBooks, and 3,964 magazines. As an added bonus it includes 130 podcasts that are always available with simultaneous use (SU), as well as SU ebooks and audiobook titles that publishers have made available for a limited time. If you’re a part of it, let your users know about this great title, and if you’re not a member yet, find more information about participating in Nebraska Overdrive Libraries!

Love this #BookFace & reading? Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

 
 

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Friday Reads: A Carnival of Snackery: Diaries (2003-2020), by David Sedaris

I’m currently 14 hours into listening to the audiobook edition of A Carnival of Snackery: Diaries (2003-2020), by David Sedaris. I have about three hours left and will be sad when it ends, which I’d say is a pretty good endorsement. Nevertheless, I suspect the most receptive audience for this title will be individuals who already know and adore Sedaris—either because they’ve read his previous books or heard him read from them in person or on public radio.

A Carnival of Snackery is actually Sedaris’s second diary volume. His first, Theft by Finding, covered the years 1977 through 2002. Sedaris’s diary entries aren’t deep dives into personal development, but in the first volume you can definitely observe his life unfolding. When it starts Sedaris is a 20-year-old college dropout, bouncing between bad jobs and bad apartments; when it ends he is a famous 45-year-old touring author, in a long-term relationship with boyfriend Hugh Hamrick.

By comparison, throughout the entirety of A Carnival of Snackery, which begins when Sedaris is 46 and ends just after his 64th birthday, his status doesn’t change—he’s still a famous, touring author and still with Hugh. As Sedaris, himself, writes in the introduction to A Carnival of Snackery, “Theft by Finding . . . had a narrative arc. ‘David Copperfield Sedaris,’ Hugh called it. If there’s an arc to this book, I don’t know what it is.”

Narrative arc isn’t the draw though. Instead, it’s the joy of spending time with someone who excels at sharing interesting observations and anecdotes from daily life. Sedaris begins each diary entry with a date and a location. And the number of locations from which he writes is astounding–countless U.S. cities, but also a surprising number of international ones (e.g., Perth, Tokyo, Odessa, Bucharest, Riga, Reykjavik, Dubai), representing stops on his various book tours. There are also recurring locales that reflect Sedaris’s various home bases—most notably Rackham, in West Sussex, England, where he and Hugh live, and Emerald Isle, North Carolina, where he vacations with his siblings in a beach house named the Sea Section.

Diary entries range in length from a couple sentences to a couple pages. Some record memorable jokes, which Sedaris regularly solicits from people in line at his book signings. Others consist of obnoxious sayings he sees printed on t-shirts. Most often, they feature snippets of conversations overheard while traveling, and also accounts of interactions he’s had with drivers, hotel staff, store clerks, barbers, flight attendants, and others he encounters on the road. He also writes about trash—specifically what he picks up with his grabber as he walks the roads of West Sussex. (He applies himself to this task so diligently he’s had a local garbage truck named after him.) Among the most poignant diary entries are those recounting conversations with his elderly father, whose dismissive attitude toward Sedaris clearly remains a source of pain. (Sedaris’s father died at the age of 98, several months after the last diary entry in this volume.) In the end, Sedaris’s diary excerpts teach us that an interesting and curious person can turn interactions and observations that most of us would consider boring and mundane into engaging snapshots.

Sedaris, David. A Carnival of Snackery: Diaries (2003-2020). Little, Brown and Company, 2021.

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New Book Available on BARD!

George Norris, Going Home: Reflections of a Progressive Statesman” by Nebraska author Gene A. Budig and Don Walton is now available on cartridge and for download on BARD!

“Nebraskans need to remember George Norris. He truly was one of our great citizens. This book is a very enjoyable journey through those memories.”

Francis Moul, Lincoln Journal Star

This enjoyable book takes readers back through George Norris’ career and what he accomplished. It provides a contemporary perspective about a man who fought to improve everyday life for all American citizens.

TBBS borrowers can request “George Norris, Going Home,” DBC01907, or download it from the National Library Service BARD (Braille and Audio Reading Download) website. If you have high-speed internet access, you can download books to your smartphone or tablet, or onto a flash drive for use with your player. You may also contact your reader’s advisor to have the book mailed to you on cartridge.

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Cataloging Audio Recordings

**Courses are open only to Nebraska residents or those who are employed by a Nebraska library.**

From vinyl records, 8-track tapes, and cassettes, various forms of audio recordings have been included in library collections. Those who attend this course will learn how to catalog audio recordings, particularly audio books, and music, on cassette or CD.

This class will be held online from October 10th to November 18th In order to receive full credit, all assignments must be completed by November 20th.

Class participants will access the course website in order to read materials, discuss issues in a forum, and complete assignments. The class is held asynchronously, which means that participants are not required to be online at any particular time during the six weeks. The instructor will interact with the participants during the course to offer feedback and provide explanations of the material.

A few days before the class starts, class participants will be sent information about accessing the class.

To receive full credit, participants must complete all assignments AND you must receive a 75%, or above, for the course.

This class is approved for the NLC Cataloging Certification Program

Prerequisite: Library staff with some knowledge of MARC records and cataloging rules, preferred that the attendee has completed the Understanding Marc course.

To register: Go to Cataloging Audio Recordings in the Nebraska Library Commission Training Portal. Registration closes October 2nd.

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Throwback Thursday: Chopping Wood

Happy #ThrowbackThursday from Nebraska Memories!

This week, we have a 5 1/2″ x 3″ black and white photograph of a group preparing for a picnic at Kearney Lake. The man swinging the axe is Professor John A. Stryker.

This image is published and owned by Calvin T. Ryan Library at the University of Nebraska at Kearney. Working together with the Nebraska Library Commission as part of its effort to maximize access to its collection, the Calvin T. Ryan Library has digitized and made available on the Web selected photos of the early history of the institution.

If you like history, check out the Nebraska Memories archive!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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Book Club Spotlight – Why I’m an Only Child & Other Slightly Naughty Plains Folktales

Cover for: Why I'm an Only Child and Other Slightly Naughty Plains Folktales. Two older men in farming clothes look up over rolling hills at a yellow propeller plane.

I admit that I’m a newbie to the bibliography of Roger Welsch- so I thought I’d dip my toes into the proverbial waters for this week’s Book Club Spotlight. With over 40 books to his name (11 of which are in our Book Club collection), the retired UNL English and Anthropology professor is a recognizable humorist and storyteller. And in the tradition of fellow Nebraskan Louise Pound, he is also a lauded scholar of folklore, with 50 plus years of experience in the field. His book, Why I’m an Only Child & Other Slightly Naughty Plains Folktales, was awarded the Nebraska Center for the Book Award for Nonfiction: Folklore in 2017 and features a foreword by Dick Cavett.

Why I’m an Only Child is the vehicle for Welsch to define the specific type of midwestern humor he has coined “Civil Ribaldry.” In his own words: “These jokes take the form of extraordinarily subtle, distinctly rural narratives. While there is a punchline, unlike the riddling joke, for example, “civil ribaldry” does contain a clear narrative element. The stories, while slightly off-color, can be, and are, told in mixed company, even with children present, without much danger of being understood by the innocent” (Citation). According to Welsch, the oral tradition is an essential aspect of Civil Ribaldry and it tends to be more of a performance than a joke. This form of rural wit is not something to perfect or concoct; it is simply having the talent for timing and a flair for diction and detail when the moment presents itself. Welsch discusses its relationship to other forms of wit and verbal jousting, such as the Black American game of “Dozens,” and asserts their value as linguistic American traditions.

For Welsch, while Civil Ribaldry pokes fun at the stereotypical everyman, it exists more to poke fun at ourselves and to cement ourselves within a community. So often, these stories revolve around dear neighbors or even the teller’s own shortcomings. Punching down in comedy is never appropriate- but here, you might be able to get away with punching sideways. We can see this communal self-deprecation in Welch’s depiction of his hometown of Dannebrog, Nebraska: “It’s said that if you have a hammer in Dannebrog, you’re a carpenter. If you own the hammer, you’re a contractor.”

“Despite the common misunderstanding, laughter is not the universal language.”

Roger Welsch

If your group is looking for a book chock full of “slightly naughty” but lighthearted stories of the Nebraskan Plains, Why I am an Only Child is a great pick. Welsch is genuinely passionate about the rural Nebraskan diaspora, and his collection of ribaldries and musings has something everyone can appreciate and build upon in a discussion. Many of our Book Club Groups that we lend to are located in rural Nebraska, and I would love to see how they approach this type of book centered around their home, especially if they have civil ribaldries of their own. I know I do.

My final verdict? I believe that Roger has a good sense of humor. For an old man. 😉

If you’re interested in requesting this book for your book club, you can find the Book Club Kit Request Form here. (Items must be requested by a librarian)

Welsch, Roger. Why I’m an Only child & Other Slightly Naughty Plains Folktails.University of Nebraska Press. 2016

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NCompass Live: Pretty Sweet Tech – WordPress Layout Walkthrough: From the Blank Page

Learn new techniques to create custom WordPress layouts on next week’s NCompass Live webinar, on Wednesday, August 31 at 10am CT..

Special monthly episodes of NCompass Live! Join the NLC’s Technology Innovation Librarian, Amanda Sweet, as she guides us through the world of library-related Pretty Sweet Tech.

The most common WordPress question I have been getting is: “how do you make custom WordPress layouts from the ground up?” This session is for anyone who wants to design a website without the layout restrictions that happen with pre-defined themes. This will be a WordPress & Elementor plugin demonstration/ tutorial that you can revisit to learn these different techniques:

  • Building a color palette using coolors.co
  • Using alternating color block layouts.
  • Adding a Shape Divider between sections to add flair.
  • Building custom images for the web with Canva (for free).
  • Responsive two-column layouts
  • Responsive card style layouts
  • Responsive font-sizes for headers and paragraphs

If you want to learn new techniques with some of the lesser-known Elementor features, this is the session for you! I will be taking requests for technique demos as time permits. I hope to see you there!

Upcoming NCompass Live shows:

  • Sept. 7 – Retirement: Time to Ease on Down, Ease on Down the Road
  • Sept. 21 – Letters About Literature 2022
  • Sept. 28 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Oct. 5 – NO NCOMPASS LIVE THIS WEEK – ENJOY NLA!

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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Announcing the New NebraskAccess

This summer we have been busy reconfiguring NebraskAccess to accommodate new content, new database access pages, and new authentication options. NebraskAccess continues to offer the databases available in the past, as well the updated Websites Selected by Librarians, which provides the best information on Nebraska-related topics, including living and working in the state; researching Nebraska government, history and genealogy; planning a Nebraska visit or exploring the state; finding services, entertainment, education; and other frequently asked questions.

What’s new?

Content
Two new K12 databases have been added to the NebraskAccess lineup—MAS Complete, designed for high school libraries, and Middle Search Plus, designed for middle school libraries. The Explora for High Schools interface has been added, and Explora Primary is now Explora for Elementary/Middle Schools.

Database Access Pages
To support libraries that prefer to direct their users to a ready-made database access page on the NebraskAccess website, there are now three options. We will continue to maintain a page that links to all NebraskAccess databases. Additionally, we have taken the opportunity provided by our new MAS Complete and Middle Search Plus subscriptions to create two new database access pages—one aimed at high school students and one aimed at elementary/middle school students—each with customized versions of databases we think are most likely to meet the everyday research needs of those students.

As always, Nebraska libraries can link directly to individual NebraskAccess databases from pages on their own websites. This is a great way for libraries to integrate access to state- and locally-funded resources. It also gives librarians, who know their patrons best, control over which NebraskAccess databases to promote and how to present them. Information about linking to the individual databases can be found in NebraskAccess Librarian’s Toolbox: Linking to NebraskAccess.

Note: Biblionix users please stay tuned. We are working with Karl Beiser to make adding new content to your Biblionix Electronic Resources section as smooth as possible.

Authentication Options
Current methods of authentication will continue to work but there are changes in the password option, as well as other new authentication options.

To accompany the three new access pages, we will distribute three unique NebraskAccess passwords to each participating library—one for each access page. These passwords will be updated annually, on August 1. This is a change from our past practice of distributing a single NebraskAccess password to each library, and updating it twice per year.

To help you distribute passwords to patrons for home use, customizable business cards can be found in the NebraskAccess Librarian’s Toolbox.

New options for implementation of IP Authentication are available, so we ask that you read NebraskAccess Linking and Authentication to find the best option for your library.

EBSCO, the vendor responsible for many NebraskAccess database offerings, now provides an SSO (Single Sign On) option for students. K12 schools not already set up but interested in this option should contact Allana Novotny, 402-471-6681, 800-307-2665.

Notes:

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#BookFaceFriday “The Forgotten Home Child” by Genevieve Graham

Who could forget #BookFaceFriday?

This week’s #BookFaceFriday is the unforgettable “The Forgotten Home Child” by Genevieve Graham (Simon & Schuster, 2020). Based on the true story of the British Home Children, this historical novel will surely leave your book club group with much to discuss. Didn’t remember to put in your request before this popular title was reserved by another group? Check out these similar titles on our read-alike suggestion page. We’ve taken the work out of finding other books to tide you over until your first choice is available, or just to help you find that next great selection. All titles on this page are in the Book Club Kit collection and suggestions were compiled with the help of the NoveList database from NebraskAccess.

You can find this title and all of the historical fiction available on our Book Club Kits page; just look in the Search Options section and select the Historical Fiction in the Genre drop-down list.

The Forgotten Home Child is a poignant, edgy, and skillfully written portrayal of a Home Child’s experience that typified so many. The absence of any sugar coating makes this story come to life and brings a level of reality that is often lacking—an emotional journey well worth reading.”

LORI OSCHEFSKI, CEO of the British Home Children Advocacy and Research Association

Book Club Kits Rules for Use

  1. These kits can be checked out by the librarians of Nebraska libraries and media centers.
  2. Circulation times are flexible and will be based upon availability. There is no standard check-out time for book club kits.
  3. Please search the collection to select items you wish to borrow and use the REQUEST THIS KIT icon to borrow items.
  4. Contact the Information Desk at the Library Commission if you have any questions: by phone: 800/307-2665, or by email: Information Services Team

Love this #BookFace & reading? Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

 
 

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Friday Reads: Before We Were Yours, by Lisa Wingate

I’ll be honest right off the bat here–I resisted reading this book for a very long time–almost 5 years to be exact. Even though it’s been very popular, as an adoptee, I tend to shy away from stories about adoption. Not because my own adoption was bad, but because I’ve heard stories and know some adoptees personally, whose lives did not turn out as well as mine.

That being said, Before We Were Yours, by Lisa Wingate, is powerful, well-written, and based on one of America’s most notorious real-life adoption scandals. It is a story of families torn apart, but sometimes, in the end, brought together again.

Memphis, 1939. Twelve-year-old Rill Foss and her four younger siblings live a magical life aboard their family’s Mississippi River shantyboat. But when their father must rush their mother to the hospital one stormy night, Rill is left in charge – until strangers arrive in force. Wrenched from all that is familiar and thrown into a Tennessee Children’s Home Society orphanage, the Foss children are assured that they will soon be returned to their parents – but they quickly realize the dark truth. At the mercy of the facility’s cruel director, Rill fights to keep her sisters and brother together in a world of danger and uncertainty.

Aiken, South Carolina, present day. Born into wealth and privilege, Avery Stafford seems to have it all: a successful career as a federal prosecutor, a handsome fiancé, and a lavish wedding on the horizon. But when Avery returns home to help her father weather a health crisis, a chance encounter leaves her with uncomfortable questions and compels her to take a journey through her family’s long-hidden history, on a path that will ultimately lead either to devastation or to redemption.

Lisa Wingate’s riveting, wrenching, and ultimately uplifting tale reminds us how, even though the paths we take can lead to many places, the heart never forgets where we belong. Amazon.com

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Throwback Thursday: Cats in the Library

This week’s #ThrowbackThursday is just purr-fect!

This week, we have a black and white lantern slide featuring William Wallace’s cats, Nicholas and Deborah! The two cats are seen in the library of the Wallace residence licking from a bowl on the floor.

This photo was created by William Wallace. He was a vice president of Omaha National Bank, as well as the president of the Omaha Library Board. This image is published and owned by Omaha Public Library. The items from Omaha Public Library featured on the Nebraska Memories archive include early Omaha-related maps dating from 1825 to 1922, as well as over 1,100 postcards and photographs of the Omaha area.

Do you like history? Check out the Nebraska Memories archive for historic materials related to the state of Nebraska!

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. The Nebraska Memories archive is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information.

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NCompass Live: Team Up with Your Community!

Learn some amazing ways rural librarians can ‘Team Up with Your Community!’ on next week’s NCompass Live webinar, on Wednesday, August 24 at 10am CT..

We all know teamwork makes the dream work, but obstacles big and small can keep us from doing as much collaborative work as we’d like. Based on results of the IMLS-funded HEAL (Healthy Eating and Active Living) at the Library via Co-Developed Programming, you’ll learn some of the amazing ways rural librarians are already teaming up with everyone from regional hospitals to passionate individuals to make their communities healthier, more inclusive places. This highly interactive session will include community conversations about your experiences teaming up with others – with the ultimate goal of creating a publicly accessible, real world toolkit to help rural librarians do more by leveraging the power of partnerships.

Presenter: Noah Lenstra, Assistant Professor of Library and Information Science, University of North Carolina Greensboro.

Upcoming NCompass Live shows:

  • Aug. 31 – Pretty Sweet Tech – WordPress Layout Walkthrough: From the Blank Page
  • Sept. 7 – Retirement: Time to Ease on Down, Ease on Down the Road
  • Sept. 21 – Letters About Literature 2022
  • Sept. 28 – Pretty Sweet Tech
  • Oct. 5 – NO NCOMPASS LIVE THIS WEEK – ENJOY NLA!

For more information, to register for NCompass Live, or to listen to recordings of past events, go to the NCompass Live webpage.

NCompass Live is broadcast live every Wednesday from 10am – 11am Central Time. Convert to your time zone on the Official U.S. Time website. The show is presented online using the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Before you attend a session, please see the NLC Online Sessions webpage for detailed information about GoToWebinar, including system requirements, firewall permissions, and equipment requirements for computer speakers and microphones.

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#BookFaceFriday “Not Here to Be Liked” by Michelle Quach

We’re not taking this #BookFaceFriday lying down!

Just another relaxing #BookFaceFriday at the library commission! We hope you’ll like “Not Here to Be Liked” by Michelle Quach (HarperCollins, 2021), it’s available as an eBook in the Nebraska OverDrive Libraries collection.

Get your teen or tween back into reading this school year with all the great Young Adult reads available for check out. We have an entire site dedicated to young readers looking for eBooks and Audiobooks called Nebraska OverDrive Libraries Kids & Teens. It has everything from picture books to YA, fiction, literature, and nonfiction!

“An interesting meditation on what it means to be a Gen Z feminist. Eliza is a compelling character. This mettle-bearing romcom is ideal for any teenager interested in not just feminist philosophy but also what it means to carry that philosophy into the real world.”

Booklist

Find this title and many more through Nebraska OverDrive! Libraries participating in the Nebraska OverDrive Libraries Group currently have access to a shared and growing collection of digital downloadable audiobooks and eBooks. 189 libraries across the state share the Nebraska OverDrive collection of 22,552 audiobooks, 34,599 eBooks, and 4,138 magazines. As an added bonus it includes 130 podcasts that are always available with simultaneous use (SU), as well as SU ebooks and audiobook titles that publishers have made available for a limited time. If you’re a part of it, let your users know about this great title, and if you’re not a member yet, find more information about participating in Nebraska Overdrive Libraries!

Love this #BookFace & reading? Check out our past #BookFaceFriday photos on the Nebraska Library Commission’s Facebook page!

 
 

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T-Mobile Hometown Grants Program for Small Towns

For more grants like this one, check out the NLC’s Grant Opportunities for Nebraska Libraries.

T-Mobile Hometown Grants is a $25 million, five-year initiative to support the people and organizations who help small towns across America thrive and grow by providing funding to kickstart important new community development projects.

Hometown Grants of up to $50,000 are given every quarter to up to 25 small towns to help fund projects to build, rebuild, or refresh community spaces that help foster local connections in your town, such as the public library, the town square pavilion, a historic building, an outdoor park, or a ball field.

Elected leaders, town managers/employees, and nonprofit leaders in small towns with populations of less than 50,000 are eligible and encouraged to apply online on the Hometown Grants website.

To select Hometown Grant recipients, T-Mobile works with Main Street America and Smart Growth America, two organizations that have decades of experience helping build stronger, more prosperous small towns and rural communities. Together, they assess applications from small towns based on level of detail and completeness, potential community impact, project viability and other factors.

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“In Cold Storage” on BARD!

In Cold Storage: Sex and Murder on the Plains” by Nebraska author James W. Hewitt is now available on cartridge and for download on BARD!

“In 1973 the small southwest Nebraska railroad town of McCook became the unlikely scene of a grisly murder. More than forty years later, author James W. Hewitt returns to the scene and unearths new details about what happened.”

Book Jacket

James W. Hewitt is president of the Friends of the Center for Great Plains Studies and was an adjunct professor of history at Nebraska Wesleyan University and the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. He is the author of “Slipping Backward: A History of the Nebraska Supreme Court” (Nebraska, 2007).

TBBS borrowers can request “In Cold Storage,” DBC01892, or download it from the National Library Service BARD (Braille and Audio Reading Download) website. If you have high-speed internet access, you can download books to your smartphone or tablet, or onto a flash drive for use with your player. You may also contact your reader’s advisor to have the book mailed to you on cartridge.

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