Category Archives: General

Finalists for 2018 One Book One Nebraska Announced

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
September 27, 2017

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Mary Jo Ryan
402-471-3434
800-307-2665

Finalists for 2018 One Book One Nebraska Announced

What book will all Nebraskans be encouraged to read in 2018? We will all find out on October 21. Two poetry collections, one memoir, and two novels—all stories with ties to Nebraska and the Great Plains—are the finalists for the 2018 One Book One Nebraska statewide reading program. The finalists are:

  • The Bones of Paradise by Jonis Agee, William Morrow (2016)
  • Nebraska Poetry: A Sesquicentennial Anthology 1867-2017 edited by Daniel Simon, Stephen F. Austin University Press (2017)
  • Nebraska Presence: An Anthology of Poetry edited by Greg Kosmicki and Mary K. Stillwell, The Backwaters Press (2007)
  • Ordinary Spaceman: From Boyhood Dreams to Astronaut by Clayton Anderson, University of Nebraska Press (2015)
  • Swan Gondola: A Novel by Timothy Schaffert, Riverhead Books (2015)

The One Book One Nebraska reading program, now in its thirteenth year, is sponsored by the Nebraska Center for the Book, Humanities Nebraska, and Nebraska Library Commission. It encourages Nebraskans across the state to read and discuss the same book, chosen from books written by Nebraska authors or that have a Nebraska theme or setting. A Nebraska Center for the Book committee selected the five finalists from a list of twenty-six titles nominated by Nebraskans. In the coming weeks, Nebraska Center for the Book board members will vote on the 2018 selection.

Nebraskans are invited to attend the Celebration of Nebraska Books on October 21, where the choice for the 2018 One Book One Nebraska will be announced at 5:30 p.m. at the Nebraska State Historical Society’s Nebraska History Museum, 131 Centennial Mall North, in downtown Lincoln. This year’s One Book One Nebraska selection, Black Elk Speaks (University of Nebraska Press, 2014) by John G. Neihardt will be featured in a keynote presentation by Timothy G. Anderson, author of the biography Lonesome Dreamer: The Life of John G. Neihardt (University of Nebraska Press, 2016) at 2:45 p.m. See http://onebook.nebraska.gov or https://www.facebook.com/OneBookOneNebraska for more information about ongoing 2017 One Book One Nebraska activities.

The October 21 Celebration of Nebraska Books is scheduled for 2:30 – 6:30 p.m., with the Nebraska Center for the Book Annual Meeting to be held at 1:30 p.m. Awards will be presented to the winners of the 2017 Nebraska Book Awards, and some of the winning authors will read from their work. A list of Nebraska Book Award winners is posted at http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/awards.html. The Celebration of Nebraska Books is sponsored by the Nebraska Center for the Book and Nebraska Library Commission with support from the Nebraska State Historical Society’s Nebraska History Museum. Humanities Nebraska provides support for the One Book One Nebraska keynote presentation. For more information, contact Mary Jo Ryan, maryjo.ryan@nebraska.gov, 402-471-3434 or 800-307-2665. Confirmed presenters will be announced at www.centerforthebook.nebraska.gov and http://www.facebook.com/NebraskaCenterfortheBook in advance of the Celebration.

The Nebraska Center for the Book is housed at the Nebraska Library Commission and brings together the state’s readers, writers, booksellers, librarians, publishers, printers, educators, and scholars to build the community of the book, supporting programs to celebrate and stimulate public interest in books, reading, and the written word. The Nebraska Center for the Book is supported by the national Center for the Book in the Library of Congress and the Nebraska Library Commission.

As the state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services, “bringing together people and information.”

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.

 

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Throwback Thursday: View of Lincoln, Nebraska from Capitol, 1875.

Picture postcard of the view of Lincoln, Nebraska, from the Nebraska State Capitol Building in 1875.

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Friday Reads: Mansfield Park by Jane Austen

Until recently, I rated Mansfield Park as my second least favorite Jane Austen novel. For the record, Northanger Abbey is my least favorite of Austen’s completed works. I did not care for Mansfield Park because of Austen’s depiction of Fanny Price. Fanny is a poor relation taken in by her wealthy uncle, Sir Thomas Bertram. When Fanny first arrives at Mansfield Park, she is a scared and lonely ten year old. In many ways, she remains a frightened child, prone to low spirits and headaches. I disliked Fanny because she rarely offers an opinion or speaks her mind, is often judgmental and bursts into tears much too often for my liking.

Throughout the novel, we watch Fanny’s family ignore her needs while assuming they know what’s best for her. Unlike many of her other characters, Austen allows Fanny to seethe with frustration, resentment and disappointment as they place their well-being before hers. While outwardly agreeable and meek, Fanny reveals she can be neither when refusing to marry the well-off Henry Crawford. Later the rightness of her decision is revealed when Crawford seduces and runs off with Fanny’s married cousin, Maria.

The last time I read Mansfield Park, I discovered there was more to Fanny Price than tears and moral rectitude. I still found her annoying, but I realized that Fanny enjoys the small pleasures that many of us take for granted. Walking with her cousin Edmund or listening to her brother’s stories fill Fanny with joy – she genuinely enjoys these moments. Her brother William’s impending visit, an outing to a neighboring estate and attending a ball thrown in her honor; all reduce her to tears. Yes, she is overwrought. I can’t imagine being so caught up in the moment that I weep with happiness. Yet, there is something appealing about Fanny’s willingness to embrace each and every moment life gives her. Perhaps this is Jane Austen’s greatest lesson.

Austen, Jane. Mansfield Park. New York: Penguin Classics, 2003.

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Throwback Thursday: Little Building, Lincoln, Nebraska.

Picture postcard of the Little Building, Lincoln, Nebraska.  Approximate date early 1900s.

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Free Webinar! Back to School: School Library Legislation in the Statehouses

Fewer than half of all states currently require a school librarian in their public schools. In recent years, however, legislation has been introduced in several additional states. Who is leading these efforts and what insights can they share with the rest of us? We will hear from three states and follow their presentations with a facilitated discussion for participants.  The representatives from the three states are:

Debra Kachel, Legislative Liaison, Pennsylvania School Librarians Association

James Keehbler, Former President, New Jersey Library Association

Mernie Maestas, President, Missouri Association of School Librarians

When: Wednesday, September 27, 2017, 2:00:00 PM CDT – 3:00:00 PM CDT

Register here!

Attendance during the live webinar is free and open to all. A seat in the webinar is reserved for the first 100 logins.

All registrants will receive a link to the recorded webinar if it fills to capacity.

The link to the recording will be available at http://www.ala.org/advocacy/chapter-advocacy-exchange

This webinar is brought to you by the American Association of School Librarians (AASL), the Chapter Relations Office (CRO), and the Office for Library Advocacy (OLA) as part of our State Ecosystems initiative to strengthen coalitions across libraries.

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Celebrate Nebraska’s 2017 Book Award Winners at October 21 Celebration

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
September 19, 2017

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Mary Jo Ryan
402-471-3434
800-307-2665

Celebrate Nebraska’s 2017 Book Award Winners at October 21 Celebration

Celebrate Nebraska’s 2017 Book Award winners with author readings and an awards presentation ceremony at the Nebraska Center for the Book’s Celebration of Nebraska Books on October 21 at the Nebraska State Historical Society’s Nebraska History Museum, 131 Centennial Mall North, in downtown Lincoln. Winners of the 2017 Nebraska Book Awards will be honored and the celebration will include readings by some of the winning authors, designers, and illustrators of books with a Nebraska connection published in 2017. And the winners are:

Anthology: Not Quite So Stories by David S. Atkinson. Publisher: Literary Wanderlust

Children’s Picture Book: Choose Your Days by Paula S. Wallace. Publisher: Cinco Puntos Press 

Young Adult: Keeping Captain by N. L. Sharp. Publisher: Prairieland Press

 Young Adult Honor: The Ghost Juggler by Nona Brooks Morrison. Publisher: Prairieland Press

Cover/Design/Illustration: Okoboji: Over 160 Years of History and Images by Cristy Clarke Hedgpeth. Editing and content design by Sandra Wendel and Ellie Pelto. Graphic Design by Rachel Moore. Production by Lisa Pelto, Concierge Marketing. Publisher: Hedgpeth Publishing

Illustration Honor: Leaves of Absence: An Illustrated Guide to Common Garden Affection by Laura Madeline Wiseman. Art by Sally Deskins. Publisher: Red Dashboard   

Fiction: The Bones of Paradise: A Novel by Jonis Agee. Publisher: William Morrow

Fiction Short Story Honor: Where We Land: Stories by Daryl Farmer. Publisher: Brighthorse Books

Nonfiction Biography: A Warrior of the People: How Susan La Flesche Overcame Racial and Gender Inequality to Become America’s First Indian Doctor by Joe Starita. Publisher: St. Martin’s Press

Nonfiction Folklore: Why I’m an Only Child and Other Slightly Naughty Plains Folktales by Roger Welsch. Publisher: University of Nebraska Press

Nonfiction Memoir: Bread: A Memoir of Hunger by Lisa Knopp. Publisher: University of Missouri Press

Nonfiction Photography: Last Days of Red Cloud Agency, Peter T. Buckley’s Photograph Collection (1876-1877), by Thomas R. Buecker. Publisher: Nebraska State Historical Society Books

Nonfiction Reference: Great Plains Indians by David J. Wishart. Publisher: University of Nebraska Press

Nonfiction Travel: Trespassing Across America: One Man’s Epic, Never-Done-Before (and Sort of Illegal) Hike Across the Heartland by Ken Ilgunas. Publisher: Blue Rider Press

Poetry: Homing: The Collected Poems of Don Welch (1975-2015) by Don Welch. Edited by Dwaine Spieker. Publisher: Rogue Faculty Press 

Poetry Honor: I Have Nothing to Say about Fire by Marjorie Saiser. Publisher: Backwaters Press 

Poetry Honor: Singing and Dying by Glenna Luschei. Publisher: Penciled In 

The Celebration of Nebraska, free and open to the public, will also honor winners of the 2017 Jane Geske and Mildred Bennett awards. The Mildred Bennett Award recognizes individuals who have made a significant contribution to fostering the literary tradition in Nebraska, reminding us of the literary and intellectual heritage that enriches our lives and molds our world. The Jane Geske Award is presented to a Nebraska organization for exceptional contribution to literacy, books, reading, libraries, or literature in Nebraska. It commemorates Geske’s passion for books, and was established in recognition of her contributions to the well-being of the libraries of Nebraska.

The 2017 One Book One Nebraska selection, Black Elk Speaks (University of Nebraska Press) by John G. Neihardt will be featured in a keynote presentation by Timothy G. Anderson, author of the biography Lonesome Dreamer: The Life of John G. Neihardt (University of Nebraska Press) at 2:45 p.m.

The Nebraska Center for the Book Annual Meeting will be held at 1:30 p.m.—just prior to the 2:30-6:30 p.m. Celebration. An awards reception honoring the winning authors, book signings, and announcement of the 2018 One Book One Nebraska book choice will conclude the festivities.

The Celebration of Nebraska Books is sponsored by Nebraska Center for the Book and Nebraska Library Commission, with support from the Nebraska State Historical Society’s Nebraska History Museum. Humanities Nebraska provides support for One Book One Nebraska. The Nebraska Center for the Book is housed at the Nebraska Library Commission and brings together the state’s readers, writers, booksellers, librarians, publishers, printers, educators, and scholars to build the community of the book, supporting programs to celebrate and stimulate public interest in books, reading, and the written word. The Nebraska Center for the Book is supported by the national Center for the Book in the Library of Congress and the Nebraska Library Commission.

As the state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services, “bringing together people and information.”

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.

 

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Free Nebraska Statehood 150 Videos!

Did you know that Nebraska Statehood 150 has a whole series of short YouTube videos, titled NOW YOU KNOW NEBRASKA!, about the history, culture, people, government, and places of Nebraska?

Click here to watch: NOW YOU KNOW NEBRASKA!

Excellent resource for learning and teaching about Nebraska History!

The first week’s videos are presented by current Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts, but the rest are presented by various kids and adults.  VERY informative, fun, quick facts about Nebraska!

Five videos per week, beginning with January 9th, 2017.

 

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Free Nebraska Statehood 150 Event!

Salute to the Good Life : A Gala Tribute to Nebraska’s History, Culture and Military Personnel

Webpage

Friday, September 22

4:00 PM – 10:30 PM
Centennial Mall South | Lincoln
Free Admission | Family Friendly
Festival Seating | Bring Your Own Lawn Chairs or Blankets

Food Trucks| Laser Light Show | Fireworks | Remembering our Fallen Memorial | Emceed By Broadcast House

Schedule:

Truckin’ Through Nebraska | A Mobile Children’s Museum
Open 3:00-7:00 p.m.

Food Trucks
3:00-11:00 p.m.

Nebraska National Guard Band
4:00-4:45 p.m.

Josh Hoyer
5:00-6:00 p.m.

The Back 40
6:15-7:30 p.m.

Kris Lager Band
7:45-8:45 p.m.

Laser Light Show
8:45-9:05 p.m.

Kris Lager Band
9:10-10:10 p.m.

Fireworks Finale
10:10-10:30 p.m.

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The Undivided Back

Scandinavian Young Women's Christian Association of AmericaWhen looking at old postcards in Nebraska Memories have you noticed that some of them have writing on the front of the card or that there is a lot of white space around the picture on the postcard? This may be because in the early days people were not allowed to write a message on the back of the postcard next to the address.

The Smithsonian Institution provides a nice history of postcards starting in 1861 when the US Congress passed an act that allowed privately printed cards to be sent in the mail.

A Promenade, Krug Park, Omaha's Polite ResortLater legislation passed in 1873 allowed the government to produce postcards with a message on one side and an address on the other side. These government postcards could be mailed for 1¢ however privately created postcards cost 2¢ to mail. In 1898 the prices were changeed so all postcards required just a 1¢ stamp. Other laws were enacted between 1898 and 1906 that changed the requirements on what information must be printed on the back of a postcard however; people were still not allowed to write a message on the back of the card next to the address.

Americans were finally allowed to write on the backside of the postcards in 1907. According to the 1906 Post-Office Department Annual Reports for the Fiscal Year ended June 30, 1906, this change came about after the meeting of the Universal Postal Union that took place in Rome. After a bit of research, I learned that Universal Postal Union (UPU) is the international organization that sets the rules for international mail exchange. The UPU was established in 1874.Scotts Bluff, Nebr.

The change to allow writing on both sides of the card came about because of public request. Folks did not want to write a message on or next to the images on the front side of the cards. European countries were the first to make this change. Starting on October 31, 1906 the US Post Office started allowing postcards mailed from foreign countries to be delivered in the US with writing on the back. On March 1, 1907, the US Post Office allowed postcards mailed domestically to have written messages on the left side of the card next to the address. If you read the original text in the 1906 US Post  Office report, you will see that they refer to the side of the postcard that contains the address to be the front of the postcard.

This period between 1901 and 1907, when folks were not allowed to write on the back of the postcard has become known as the Undivided Back Period. All of the postcards included in this post are from Nebraska Memories and examples from the Undivided Back Period. Looking at the back of these postcards, you will see that all of them contain a printed message that makes it clear that the only thing that can be put on the back of the postcard is the address.

U. S. Post Office, Omaha, Nebr.Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information, contact Devra Dragos, Technology & Access Services Director.

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Young Readers Invited to Write to Favorite Authors

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
September 13, 2017

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Mary Jo Ryan
402-471-3434
800-307-2665

Young readers in grades 4-12 are invited to write a personal letter to an author for the Letters about Literature (LAL) contest, a national reading and writing promotion program. The letter can be to any author (living or dead) from any genre—fiction or nonfiction, contemporary or classic—explaining how that author’s work changed the student’s view of the world. The 25th annual reflective writing competition is sponsored by the Library of Congress Center for the Book and presented in association with affiliate State Centers for the Book with funding provided by the Dollar General Literacy Foundation. Letters About Literature is coordinated an sponsored in Nebraska by the Nebraska Center for the Book and the Nebraska Library Commission, with support from Houchen Bindery, Ltd., Humanities Nebraska, and Chapters Bookstore in Seward.

Prizes will be awarded on both the state and national levels. The Nebraska Center for the Book’s panel of judges will select the top letter writers in the state, to be honored in a proclamation-signing ceremony at the state capitol during National Library Week in April 2018. Their winning letters will be placed in the Jane Pope Geske Heritage Room of Nebraska Authors at Bennett Martin Public Library in Lincoln. Nebraska winners will receive state prizes, and then advance to the national judging.

A panel of national judges for the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress will select one National Winner per competition level (Level I for grades 4-6, Level II for grades 7-8, and Level III for grades 9-12) to receive a $1,000 cash award, to be announced in May 2018. The judges will also select one National Honor winner on each competition level to receive a $200 cash award.

Teachers, librarians, and parents can download free teaching materials on reader response and reflective writing, along with contest details and entry forms, at www.read.gov/letters. Nebraska-specific information (including lists of Nebraska winners of past competitions) is available at http://centerforthebook.nebraska.gov/programs/LAL.html. Get inspired by listening to Nebraska winners, Ashley Xiques and Sydney Kohl, read and talk about and their winning letters to authors that meant something to them in their own lives, see NET Radio’s All About Books (http://netnebraska.org/basic-page/radio/all-about-books). Submissions must be postmarked by December 9, 2017. For more information contact Mary Jo Ryan, MaryJo.Ryan@nebraska.gov, 402-471-3434 or 800-307-2665.

The Nebraska Center for the Book is housed at the Nebraska Library Commission and brings together the state’s readers, writers, booksellers, librarians, publishers, printers, educators, and scholars to build the community of the book, supporting programs to celebrate and stimulate public interest in books, reading, and the written word. The Nebraska Center for the Book is supported by the Nebraska Library Commission.

As the state library agency, the Nebraska Library Commission is an advocate for the library and information needs of all Nebraskans. The mission of the Library Commission is statewide promotion, development, and coordination of library and information services, bringing

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The most up-to-date news releases from the Nebraska Library Commission are always available on the Library Commission Website, http://nlc.nebraska.gov/publications/newsreleases.

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Throwback Thursday: St. John’s Church and Creighton College, Omaha, Nebraska.

Picture postcard of St. John’s Church and Creighton College, Omaha, Nebraska.  Approximate date early 1900s.

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Free Webinar! Beyond Books: Public Libraries Address the Social Determinants of Health

Beyond Books: Public libraries address the social determinants of health Breezing Along with the RML from NNLM MCR

September 20, 2017 10am MT/11am CT

Register

Join Anna Morgan from the Healthy Library Initiative as she discusses public libraries, their influence on social determinants of health, and their importance for community well-being. The Healthy Library Initiative has worked with Philadelphia area public libraries in identifying how the libraries address social determinants of health and how they can build on those programs. To read more about Healthy Library Initiative and what they do, visit http://www.healthylibrary.org/.

Presenter

Anna Uma Morgan, MD, MSc, MSHP is a general internist and recently completed the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Morgan’s work is focused on community-based interventions for addressing the social determinants of health. As a clinical scholar, she worked primarily with the Healthy Library Initiative, a partnership between Penn and the Free Library of Philadelphia aimed at harnessing the power of public libraries to improve population health. She continues to practice primary care in underserved populations.

 

Questions? Contact:

Annette Parde-Maass

Education and Outreach Coordinator

National Network of Libraries of Medicine | MidContinental Region

Creighton University Health Sciences Library

AnnetteParde-Maass@creighton.edu

402.280.4156

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Free Webinar! Libraries Transform: Health Literacy Toolkit

Libraries Transform: Health Literacy Toolkit

Register

Date: September 14, 2017

Time: 12-1pm MT/1-2pm CT

Description: October is Health Literacy Month. The American Library Association (ALA) and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) have created a Health Literacy Month toolkit for the Libraries Transform campaign. Join Amanda J. Wilson (NNLM) and Jeff Julian (ALA) as they discuss NNLM’s mission to support health literacy efforts in libraries and explain how to use the key messages, data, and marketing materials to promote health literacy at your library.

1 MLA CE is offered for this session

 

Annette Parde-Maass

Education and Outreach Coordinator

National Network of Libraries of Medicine | MidContinental Region

Creighton University Health Sciences Library

AnnetteParde-Maass@creighton.edu

402.280.4156

Posted in Education & Training, General, Information Resources, Library Management, Programming, Uncategorized, What's Up Doc / Govdocs | Leave a comment

What’s Up @ the Commission?

You have questions. We have answers. This is your chance to get all your questions about the Nebraska Library Commission answered. Join Rod Wagner, Director of the Nebraska Library Commission, and Nebraska Library Commission staff at the Nebraska Library Association/Nebraska School Librarians Association Conference in Kearney, Thursday, October 12, 2:00-3:00 p.m.

In this panel presentation, we will answer the questions you submit in advance and field questions from the audience. The program will cover current and forthcoming Nebraska Library Commission projects and initiatives including state and federal library funding, grants, educational opportunities, events, etc. And a Q & A lightning round will feature Library Commission staff answering questions about their work and the work of their colleagues. Please submit your advance questions now via email to Mary Jo Ryan.

For more information about the Nebraska Library Association/Nebraska School Librarians Association Conference, see http://www.nebraskalibraries.org/page/Neblib2017.
#neblib2017

 

 

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What’s Up Doc? New State Agency Publications at the Nebraska Library Commission

New state agency publications have been received at the Nebraska Library Commission for July 2017.  Included are reports from the Nebraska Department of Agriculture, the Nebraska State Board of Health, the Nebraska Department of Motor Vehicles, and new books from the University of Nebraska Press, to name a few.

All items, except the books from the University of Nebraska Press, and the Local Emergency Operations Plans, are available for immediate viewing and printing by clicking on the highlighted .pdf link.

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Throwback Thursday: Post Office, Fremont, Nebraska.

 

Picture postcard of the Post Office, Fremont, Nebraska, John Hauser Dist., Fremont, Nebraska.  Approximate date early 1900s.

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Throwback Thursday: Omaha Boulevard, South West, Omaha, Nebraska.

Picture postcard of Omaha Boulevard, South West, Omaha, Nebraska.  Approximate date the early 1900s.

 

Visit Nebraska Memories to search for or browse through many more historical images digitized from photographs, negatives, postcards, maps, lantern slides, books and other materials.

Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission. If your institution is interested in participating in Nebraska Memories, see http://nlc.nebraska.gov/nebraskamemories/participation.aspx for more information

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Nebraska Libraries Encouraged to Apply for National Medal for Library Service

IMLS LogoIMLS Is Accepting Nominations for the 2018 National Medal. Each year, the Institute of Museum and Library Services recognizes outstanding libraries and museums that have made significant contributions to improve the wellbeing of their communities. The winning museums and libraries are presented with the National Medal for Museum and Library Service, the nation’s highest honor for community service. This week our #IMLS Program Officer Michele Farrell visited Nebraska and reminded us to encourage Nebraska libraries to apply for this honor. Nebraska Library Commission staff thought of lots of libraries that are providing exemplary programs and services in their communities and we want to encourage all of you to throw your hats into the ring!

IMLS is now accepting nominations for the 2018 awards. Anyone—an employee, a board member, a member of the public, or an elected official—can nominate an institution. To be considered, the institution must complete and return a nomination form by October 2, 2017.

This year, IMLS is particularly interested in museums and libraries with programs that build community cohesion and serve as catalysts for positive community change, including programs that provide services for veterans and military families, at-risk children and families, the un- and under-employed, and youth confronting barriers to STEM-related employment.

All types of nonprofit libraries and library organizations, associations and consortia are eligible, including academic, school, digital, tribal, and special libraries or archives. The ten winning institutions are honored at a ceremony in Washington, D.C., are spotlighted in the news media and on social media, and are invited to host a two-day visit from StoryCorps to record community member stories. As part of the selection process, approximately thirty finalists are chosen and are featured by IMLS during a six-week social media and press campaign.

Winning the medal elevates an institution’s profile and can positively impact fundraising, programming, and partnership and outreach activities.

Institutions interested in being considered should read the nomination form carefully and contact the designated program contacts with questions.

Program Contacts

Program contacts for the National Medal for Museum and Library Service are:

Museums: Mark Feitl, Program Specialist, 202-653-4635
Libraries: Laura McKenzie, Administrative Specialist, 202-653-4644

You may also submit your question by e-mail: nationalmedals@imls.gov

About the Institute of Museum and Library Services
The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) is celebrating its 20th Anniversary. The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s approximately 123,000 libraries and 35,000 museums. Our mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. Our grant making, policy development, and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

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Friday Reads: “New Prairie Kitchen” by Summer Miller. Photographs by Dana Damewood.

It seems like the best cookbooks are the ones that tell a story—in addition to sharing great recipes and scrumptious photos. Recently I’ve been reading the stories, trying the recipes, and gazing at the photos in New Prairie Kitchen by Summer Miller. The author, a young mom and freelance writer from the Omaha area, explored restaurants and farms within a 200-mile radius of Omaha and brings us stories of real people who grow, prepare, and serve real food for their families and friends. The author says that the book “…pays homage to the outstanding and innovative chefs, farmers, and artisans of Nebraska, Iowa, and South Dakota. They have shared some of their favorite recipes here, organized by season and focused on regionally sourced meat, poultry, game, and produce. Profiles of these exceptional people are nestled throughout the book.” I love the stories and photos, and I’m loving the food, as well.

After perusing the New Prairie Kitchen recipes, I went to the Farmer’s Market and bought a 4 pound pork shoulder roast from a local producer that was perfect for trying the Spice-Rubbed Slow-Cooker Pork (Kevin Shinn of Bread and Cup in Lincoln, NE). What could be simpler than a spice rub and a slow cooker? I did have to add some liquid to mine since my slow-cooker must be a little on the hot side, but after 6 hours the roast was juicy and fragrant—and I shredded it apart with two forks just like the experts on the cooking channel on TV. I should have made a YouTube video. Next, my backyard bumper crop of heirloom tomatoes inspired me to make Tomato Chutney (Sean Wilson of Proof in Des Moines, IA) and Tomato Marmalade (Clayton Chapman of The Grey Plume in Omaha, NE). Both are delicious on bread and cheese—and as a bonus, I got to use some of the garlic and jalapeño chilies from my garden too. And I’m not done yet. I’ll be making the Black Walnut and Clove Muffins (Maggie Pleskac of Maggie’s Vegetarian Café in Lincoln, NE) for the next Nebraska Library Commission potluck—and more.

The book might also provide a little tourism boost. The food sounds so good, it makes me want to hop in the car and go out in search of the places where other people will make this yummy food for me. Maybe a trip to the Back Alley Bakery in Hastings, NE is in my future?

To find out more about this Nebraska Book Award-winning cookbook and the “foodways” of the Great Plains, see Summer Miller’s blog at http://www.scaldedmilk.com/.

Review by Mary Jo Ryan.

#fridayreads

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Throwback Thursday: Lagoon at Antelope Park, Lincoln, Nebraska.

Picture postcard of the lagoon at Antelope Park, Lincoln, Nebraska.  Approximate date early 1900s.

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