Author Archives: Sally Snyder

What’s Sally Reading?

2016 Notable Children’s Books Announced

The Association of Library Services to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association (ALA) has announced their list of books from 2015 that were selected as Notable Children’s Books – 2016.  As it says on the web page, “According to the Notables Criteria, ‘notable’ is defined as: Worthy of note or notice, important, distinguished, outstanding.” The list is divided into four sections: Younger Readers, Middle Readers, Older Readers, and All Ages. Each category is “loosely” defined by grade ranges in the introduction. Enjoy looking over the list and I hope you find something to add to your collection!

Koehler096Something small and white this week reminded me of the picture book The Little Snowplow by Lora Koehler. The Little Snowplow joined the BIG trucks for the town, and they all told him to leave the jobs to them, they would handle them and he was too little. So he cleaned up after parades, cleared streams and other small jobs, but as fall began to change to winter he began his training exercises. When the snow fell, it was soon overwhelming. He kept clearing and clearing, and soon went to work to help the dump truck who was caught in an avalanche. Power of the small.

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

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ALA Announces the Youth Media Awards

The Association for Library Services to Children (ALSC) Division of the American Library Association (ALA) announced Monday, January 11, 2016, the winner of the Newbery and Caldecott Medals.

Last Stop on Market Street written by Matt de la Peña and illustrated by Christian Robinson, is the 2016 Newbery Medal winner. Three Newbery Honor Books also were named: The War that Saved My Life written by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley, Roller Girl written and illustrated by Victoria Jamieson, and Echo written by Pam Muñoz Ryan.

The 2016 Caldecott Medal winner is Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear illustrated by Sophie Blackall and written by Lindsay Mattick. Four Caldecott Honor Books also were named: Trombone Shorty illustrated by Bryan Collier, written by Troy Andrews, Waiting illustrated and written by Kevin Henkes, Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer, Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement illustrated by Ekua Holmes, written by Carole Boston Weatherford, Last Stop on Market Street illustrated by Christian Robinson, written by Matt de le Peña.

To read a copy of the ALA press announcement and learn about all the other award winners and honor books, go to: http://nlc.nebraska.gov/youth/ala.yma.2016.pdf

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Friday Reads: How to Babysit a Leopard by Ted & Betsy Lewin

Ted and Betsy Lewin take turns recounting some of the many experiences they had while traveling the globe in order to research different animals and locations for the books they have written for children.  Some events were frightening – somLewin072e humorous, all retold for the reader to share the back seat during their lives on the road in Africa, India, Mongolia and more – covering six continents!

Plenty of their sketches from the trips as well as photographs are included on each two-page spread.  I enjoyed reading about Africa, somewhere I have been, as well as the many places I have not!  This book may inspire future travelers, artists, and writers. What amazing lives they have led!

 

 

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What’s Sally Reading?

Refresher for Series Reading

The Recaptains website reminds you what happened in a book to get you ready to read next book in series.  As it states on their web page, “Yay! The next book in your favorite series is coming out soon! But hey, wait a second… what was it that happened in book 1 again? Did they kiss? Did they beat the bad guy? Did they have to run for their lives and was there a Cliffhanger with Capital C?”  Now you can find out quickly and easily what happened in the previous book.

It contains Goodreads summaries and with a click on “read more” you can access more detailed information.  There it includes an “In Short” paragraph, a “What Went Down” bulleted list of actions that occurred in the book, and “How Did It End.”  I just read through the information on The Diviners by Libba Bray since I plan to read the sequel Lair of Dreams this weekend.  It did a great job of reminding me who the characters are and what events happened in the first book.  It doesn’t cover everything, I just searched for Terry Pratchett and he is not on their author list, still I’m going to be using this site often.

Shurtliff003My highlighted book this time is Jack: The True Story of Jack & the Beanstalk by Liesl Shurtliff; I heard the author speak at the Norfolk Public Library’s 21st Annual Literature Festival held on July 25, 2015, which is a great opportunity to hear authors talk about their writing processes and get a book signed!  (Their next Festival is scheduled for July 30, 2016.)

In the book, Jack’s 7-times great grandfather was the famous Jack the Giant Killer and this Jack wants to imitate him, except that there are no giants.  But then two giants come down from the sky and take everything – the entire town – and Jack is soon up in their land to find his father and slay some giants.  Things are not that easy.  Full of adventure this twist on the fairy tale is logical and fun – with a bit of a message about greed.  Fans of her book Rump: The True Story of Rumplestiltskin (one of the Golden Sower nominees for 2015-2016) are sure to grab it.  This book is written for grades 3-6.

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

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Youth Grants for Excellence Applications due 10/2/15

The Nebraska Library Commission announces that grants are available to accredited public libraries and state-run institutional libraries for special projects in the area of children’s and young adult services. These grants are awarded to encourage innovation and expansion of public library services for youth and their parents or caregivers. Applications will be accepted for projects in an area that will benefit children and/or teens and which you see as a need in your community; for examples see the “Introduction” link below.

The Youth Grants for Excellence require a 25% match of the amount requested (grant amount), of which at least 10% must be a cash match. The minimum amount that will be awarded per grant is now $250. The $250 minimum grant amount plus the required 25% local match ($63) combine for $313 as the lowest total project amount for a Youth Grant for Excellence.

There are two different application forms. For projects requesting $250 – $1,000 in grant funds use the abbreviated, or short form. Applications requesting more than $1,000 must use the long form. Please be sure to use the correct form for your project. Please go to the “Introduction” page for links to the forms (at the bottom of the page).

Please note: AWE work stations, or similar stations of other companies, are allowed this year (2015) and then will no longer be eligible beginning in 2016.

You may also be interested in viewing the NCompass Live session from 8/20/14 titled “What You Need to Know to Apply for a Youth Grant.”

You are welcome to call or email Sally Snyder with questions or to ask for more information.

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Friday Reads: School for Brides & Keeping the Castle, by Patrice Kindl

I recently finished A School for Brides by Patrice Kindl, a new companion title to her Keeping the Castle which came out in 2012.  I might be cheating by talking about two books, but they certainly go hand-in-hand.

Kindl011Keeping the Castle is reminiscent of Pride and Prejudice with a touch of Cinderella – due to stepsisters.  Seventeen-year-old Althea knows the only way to save her family’s decaying castle, its grounds, and their tenants for her widowed mother and much younger brother is to marry well.  The two unkind stepsisters living with them could contribute funds to reduce the costs but choose to complain instead.  Althea has an unfortunate habit of speaking her mind which makes finding a suitor much more difficult; she would prefer to remain single if it wasn’t so necessary to wed.  She does what she can to aid her new friend, Miss Vinchy, in finding a match, but doesn’t seem to make any progress for herself.  Readers will see the possibilities long before Althea does, which adds to the fun.  Romance, proper behavior of the time and surprises are included.

A School for Brides is set in the same time and place – the early 1800sKindl084 in the town of Lesser Hoo in Yorkshire England – and some of the characters from the first book make secondary appearances here.  The eight young ladies of the Winthrop Hopkins Female Academy study their lessons in math, French, comportment and stitching; but their real purpose at the school is for each to find a husband.  Too bad Lesser Hoo has only one sort-of-eligible bachelor.  Things look up when a young well-to-do gentleman is thrown from his horse.  A broken leg necessitates his stay at the school and soon some of his friends come to visit.  Manners of the day, social standing, treatment of household staff and the winning or losing of ladies’ hands are all addressed.  A couple of mysteries and some ne’er-do-wells in the mix make a humorous and gratifying tale.

I greatly enjoyed both books, the setting, the humor, and the writing; the author has provided two enjoyable Jane Austen-like capers.  They are a fun and lovely change from the many teen dystopia and/or killer suspense novels I have been reading lately.  They will be enjoyed by teens and adults.

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What’s Sally Reading?

Booktalk Database

If you are interested in book talks but don’t have time to write them all yourself, visit Nancy Keane’s website.  Click on “New This Month” on the left and you will find ways to search the database on the left.  You can choose searching by author or by title, as well as a subject list.  If you are more interested in seeing what is new to the site you can click on the month by month listing in the main area of the page.  She welcomes everyone to contribute a book talk and to use any that are there.  Some books have several book talks written by different people.  There are plenty of titles, picture books on up to young adult choices.

The Library Commission owns several titles about booktalks by Joni Richards Bodart, the first person to write about booktalking, including Booktalk!,  Booktalk! 2, and the more recent Booktalk! 5, about how to write booktalks and how to present them as well as having samples if you are looking for something to help you get started.  Good luck!

Dyckman029In Wolfie the Bunny by Ame Dyckman, the Bunny family finds a basket on their doorstep with a wolf cub in it.  Mom & Dad are thrilled.  Daughter, Dot, exclaims, “He’s going to eat us all up!” but the parents continually ignore her.  Finally, one day at the market, it looks like her prediction is coming true (by this time Wolfie is wearing a pink bunny suit) but instead it is bear who wants to eat Wolfie.  Dot to the rescue!  Sibling rivalry, cleverness and courage, and family love are at the heart of this story.  This picture book will capture readers’ attention, especially when the bear appears!

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

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What’s Sally Reading?

Get to Know the Nominees for Teens’ Top Ten 2015

The Hub has begun a four-part The Hub to highlight the 24 titles on the Teens’ Top Ten list for 2015.  The books were published between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2014.  You can see the entire list here if you want to check and see how many your library owns.  Teens from all over the country can vote for their favorite title beginning on August 15, 2015 and continue through Teen Read Week (October 18-24, 2015).  The ten titles receiving the most votes will be named the Teens’ Top Ten list for 2015.  I hope your teens will want to participate!

Vernon048Castle Hangnail by Ursula Vernon, who wrote the Dragonbreath series, introduces readers to new characters and setting, which could become a series as well.  Castle Hangnail has been without a master for far too long, and the main caretaker is worried it will be decommissioned.  Then Miss Molly, a 12-year-old witch arrives to claim the castle.  She does have an invitation (one of many sent out) but she seems so unorthodox, she’s nice (usually) and considerate, but she can do some magic.  She has four tasks to complete in order to claim the castle, maybe everything will work out.  Then, the sorceress who was the actual recipient of the invitation appears at the door; and she is nasty, just as the master of the castle should be.  But the minions in the castle rather like Miss Molly, what should they do?

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

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What’s Sally Reading?

Malinda Lo’s Four-Part post of “Perceptions of Diversity in Book Reviews”

Take some time to read and think about the things Malinda Lo has to say to us all.  You will have to scroll down to read the posts in order since the web page has them lined up with the fourth post first and so on.  While she is specifically addressing phrasing in book reviews, her message is well worth consideration.  I intend to reread this often as I write my blurbs for presentations on recent books I recommend to Nebraska librarians.  I am certain that in the past I have made similar assumptions and I hope to stop it completely.  If you are interested in following Malinda Lo and Cindy Pon on their blog, it is located here.

Applegate219Ivan: The Remarkable True Story of the Shopping Mall Gorilla  by Katherine Applegate is a nonfiction picture book that tells the story of Ivan, who was the main character in the author’s Newbery Medal winning title, The One and Only Ivan.  Here she tells of his capture in Africa and travel in a crate with another baby gorilla named Burma.  The man who owned a shopping mall in Tacoma, Washington had paid for their capture in 1962.  He eventually put him on display at the mall and Ivan was there for 27 years until a protest by the people of the area convinced the owner to send Ivan to Zoo Atlanta.  There he once again walked on green grass and met other gorillas.  A two-page spread at the back of the book tells older children and adults more about Ivan and has a couple of photographs.  This book is great for kindergarten through third grade children.

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

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Friday Reads: Screaming at the Ump by Audrey Vernick

Vernick063
Baseball season is underway and many of us head out to the ball park when we can.  Along that line of thought, the 2016 Summer Reading Program topic is about being active, with slogans “On Your Mark, Get Set, Read!,” “Get in the Game: Read” and “Exercise Your Mind – Read.”
  (I know, the 2015 summer reading program is just getting underway, I am reading ahead now.)  All of this brought me to read Screaming at the Ump by Audrey Vernick.

Casey Snowden’s father and grandfather run a sanctioned school for baseball umpires, and Casey (12) and his best friend Zeke help each fall.  This September they have only 80 students instead of the usual 100 and Casey begins to worry about the future.  He wants to be a sports writer, not run the camp, but he knows it is his father’s calling.  As the school gets underway, Casey realizes one instructor is not teaching this year.  He was usually in charge of the culminating event: “You Suck, Ump! Day” where many people from the town gather to yell at the students to help them learn to deal with noise and irritated fans.  So this year Casey and Zeke will organize the day.  Though I am not first in line for sports books, this one grabbed me, especially its title.  A fun look inside the mind of a twelve-year-old boy, and at what it takes to be an umpire.

After reading the book I enjoyed looking over this page to find out more about actual umpire schools.

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What’s Sally Reading?

A Few Web Sites on Reading Aloud …

Here are some web sites with helpful information to share with parents.

Mem Fox & her “Ten read-aloud commandments” also her talk about books and television, to name only two of the valuable things one her web page.  Her book Reading Magic is in the Commission collection for loan to librarians.

Nebraska has its own group, Read Aloud Nebraska, which offers occasional workshops by nationally known speakers, the opportunity to sign-up to be a Read Aloud Community or a Read Aloud School (sign-up will begin again on April 1), and then the chance to ask for books free to you to give to the students or children who come into your library.

Read To Them is a national organization that currently is promoting the great idea of “One School, One Book.”  Families read a chapter a night at home and students answer the trivia question(s) about it the next day.  Everyone talks about the same book!

Bahk220Juna’s Jar by Jane Bahk:  Juna and her best friend Hector take her kimchi jar to the park every day and find things to put in it.  A caterpillar, rocks or bugs.  But one day Hector and his family have moved away.  She then has a series of adventures with the different things she puts in her jar.  Her older brother bought her a fish, and Juna swims with it in the ocean that night.  The night she rides a cricket she caught, they stop at Hector’s new house, and she sees he is all right—then she is happy.  This is another good read-aloud for Story time.

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

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Friday Reads: Andre the Giant: Life and Legend by Box Brown

brown2Andre the Giant: Life and Legend by Box Brown is graphic nonfiction, a biography of Andre Roussimoff told in graphic novel format with black, white, and grey art.  I picked this up wondering both about Andre’s life and how the author/illustrator would choose to present it.  Brown opens with a three-page explanation of professional wrestling as it was during Andre’s time in the World Wrestling Federation.

Andre had gigantism, the result of an excessive production of growth hormone during his childhood.  During his adult life Andre suffered pain, his brow became more pronounced, his joints were affected, and he had back surgery to ease his pain.  He was presented as a kind and considerate person, but he could get upset at times and not many people wanted to push the point with him.  Not surprising, I also learned that Andre enjoyed drinking and partying.  While reading about specific wrestling matches and heavy drinking is not my usual reading choice, I also learned about his life, how tired he became of people gawking at him, and the difficulties of being so large.

This title will appeal to older teen and adult fans of wrestling, graphic novels, and of “The Princess Bride.”

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What’s Sally Reading?

Amelia Bloomer Project Announces the 2015 Booklist

As part of the Social Responsibilities Round Table of the American Library Association, the Amelia Bloomer Project focuses on feminist books for readers age 0-18.  Each year the committee creates a booklist to recommend to librarians and others.  The 2015 list also includes a Top Ten list selected by the committee.  I hope you all have a few of these titles in your collections, and maybe you will find another one or two to add.

MiddletonElya012Little Roja Riding Hood by Susan Middleton Elya is a good picture book choice for the upcoming summer reading program.  When the wolf tricks Roja into picking some flowers for her grandma, he sneaks off with her red cape to visit grandma.  Can Grandma and Roja handle a wolf and save the day?  The sprinkling of Spanish words are understood within the context of the story, and the author has included a pronunciation guide and translation of each in the front of the book.  Watch the pages for the Three Blind Mice and a couple of tiny troublemakers:trickster elves.  A good read-aloud for Story time, and a 2015 Pura Belpré Illustrator Honor Book.

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

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What’s Sally Reading?

Read Across America Day is March 2!

Sponsored by the National Education Association (NEA) Read Across America Day is usually held on March 2, in honor of Dr. Seuss’ birthday, but you can choose a day that works for you and your community to celebrate.  Visit the NEA for some artwork and downloadable items you can use, as well as fact sheets and media tips.

If you are planning to celebrate Read Across America Day, you may want to take a look at the Central Plains Library System’s Pinterest page with plenty of different ideas!  I took the Dr. Seuss Trivia Quiz and only missed a few!  And thank you to Denise Harders for sharing the ideas she found.

Yelchin183Arcady’s Goal by Eugene Yelchin tells of Arcady (12) who lives in an orphanage in Soviet Russia for children of people declared to be enemies of the state.  Miss Hannigan is a push-over compared to the director and guards of the orphanage.  It is the late 1930s, Arcady can earn an extra piece of bread if he defeats several other children, one at a time, with his soccer skills.  He is unbeatable.  But when he is adopted by a gentle man he begins to call “Coach” he finds himself lost in a world he doesn’t know.  A look at another place and time, this title is aimed at grades 5-8.

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

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The Hub Reading Challenge Starts Now!

The Hub is “the literature blog for YALSA, the Young Adult Library Services Association.”  Starting today, The Hub is challenging all who wish to participate to read or listen to 25 titles off of the eligible title list.  A PDF of the list is available here.  Their rules state you must read the 25 books during the challenge period: 2/9/15 – 6/21/15.  Be sure to read all the rules and register if you are going for the prize.  If you complete the challenge within the time period and fill out a completion form, you will be eligible for the grand prize drawing for a tote bag filled with 2014 & 2015 YA titles!

If you, like me, want to participate in your own way, that’s great too!  I am going to try to read all of a couple of the lists, but am not going to compete for the grand prize.  Join in and blog or tweet about how you are doing on you own challenge.  Hope you enjoy it!

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What’s Sally Reading?

Finding Upcoming Titles

Recently I was asked for some suggestions of how to find out about titles that are soon to be published, including subsequent titles in series.  Here is a good start: Naomi Bates wrote a blog posting about different sites that help readers keep up with teen lit, including recommendations and series.  Take a look at the sites she included, you may find a new favorite!

Two sites mentioned in the comments section of her blog posting are FictFact; you can click on any day on the calendar to learn which titles are being published that day.  This web page appears to focus on teen titles in series.   Also mentioned is Recaptains, which gives a summary of the action in each title in an included series, great for reminding you what happened in book 2 before moving on to book 3.

Becker197Quest by Aaron Becker is a wordless picture book and a follow-up to his 2013 title, Journey.  In Quest the girl and boy, each with their special crayon, encounter a king who also has a special crayon.  He gives them a map and some unusual items before being pulled back through a door.  The children follow and  they journey through this land trying to help the king.  Beautiful artwork and the solving of a puzzle will appeal to the intended audience of Kindergarten through grade 3.

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

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ALA Youth Media Awards

Monday, February 2, the American Library Association, Youth Media Awards were announced and once again, there were some I have not read (yet).    A few of the awards are listed below, to see a list of all the winners, go here.

The Newbery medal was awarded to The Crossover by Kwame Alexander. Two honor books were named.

The Caldecott Medal was awarded to The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend illustrated and written by Dan Santat. Six honors books were named.

The Coretta Scott King Book Award for Illustration went to Christopher Myers for Firebird. Two honor books were named.

The Coretta Scott King Author Book Award went to Jacqueline Woodson for Brown Girl Dreaming. Three honor books were named.

The Printz Award went to Jandy Nelson for I’ll Give You the Sun. Four honor books were named.

The Pura Belpré (Illustrator) Award went to Yuyi Morales for Viva Frida. Three honor books were named.

The Pura Belpré (Author) Award went to Marjorie Agosín for I Lived on Butterfly Hill. One honor book was named.

The Best Fiction for Young Adults, Quick Picks for Reluctant Readers, and other lists are now available here, scroll down to “Selected Book & Media Lists.” If you are getting ready for The Hub Challenge (more on that Monday, February 9, 2015), these lists will be necessary.

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What’s Sally Reading?

ALA Youth Media Awards will be Announced on February 2, 2015

The awards ceremony will be broadcast at 8:00 a.m. CT on Monday, Feb. 2, 2015, during the ALA Midwinter Meeting & Exhibition in Chicago.  You can join them live via your computer if you have the time.  Go here to find the link to join their live webcast.  If you prefer, you can follow I Love Libraries on Twitter and Facebook instead.  I will be clicking on the “webcast” link hoping I can be added to the many people joining via the Internet.  If you click the link now, you will see a countdown clock for the event.

I will send out the list of winners and honor books as soon as I receive the press release, so if you are unable to attend you will still learn about the awards not long after the video announcements.

JenkinsCreature Features: Twenty-Five Animals Explain Why They Look the Way They Do by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page.  Their newest title looks at 25 animals with unusual features and explains why they have them.  For example, the leaf-nosed bat uses its unusual nose to direct sounds to its ears.  Art dominates each page with a brief question and answer, readers will be intrigued.  The art always shows the animals head and face from the front, and not much of the rest of their bodies.  Readers may be curious enough to go looking for complete photos or illustrations of the named creatures.  This title is great for preschool through second grade.

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

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Friday Reads: Wild by Cheryl Strayed

FRStrayed179My husband and I recently saw the movie based on this book, which we enjoyed though there are certainly some tough things the author went through in her life. The film did leave us with some questions and when we saw a paperback copy at the bookstore we both immediately wanted to buy it to learn more about her experiences.  I have always been intrigued by long distance endurance hikes, such as the Appalachian Trail, and this story and trail also caught my attention.

I am closing in on the halfway mark on the book. It has answered a few questions already, and given me a look at what is involved in succeeding with challenge of this nature, as well as the impact it had on the author’s life.  I did enjoy occasional backpack trips in the Rocky Mountain National Park when I lived in Colorado, but those were only one or two nights.  This is, of course, an entirely different level of hiking.

The book does some jumping back and forth between her hike on the Pacific Crest Trail and the things in the author’s past that sent her to the trail.  Readers may be astounded at times at her lack of preparedness, but will likely want to know more about her experience, as I do.  I will emphasize that this is an adult book, since I am known for reading books for children and teens, and is one I am eager to finish.

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What’s Sally Reading?

<>Journals Reveal Their Choices in Best Books:

Three journals have presented theirs lists of best books of 2014 giving us all a good chance to look and see what we may have missed.   Kirkus listed the hilarious early chapter book Let’s Get Cracking by Cyndi Marko, first title in the “Kung Pow Chicken” series and perfect for next summer.  Booklist includes Kenneth Oppel’s Boundless on their list.  And  as I mentioned in my last post, the School Library Journal  list is here.  They include one of my favorite nonfiction titles of the year: Red Madness: How a Medical Mystery Changed What we Eat by Gail Jarrow.

I hope you have fun perusing the lists, happy that you have already purchased some of the titles, and deciding which other ones you will add to your collection. My “to read” list just doubled.

McDonnell177A Perfectly Messed-Up Story by Patrick McDonnell is a terrific read-aloud for story time.  The main character, Louie, is happily skipping along, but when you turn the page you see he was headed for a splat of jelly someone spilled on the book.  His story becomes completely derailed as more damage is found.  Kids will love his reaction to the mess and while there is one page that is dictatorial about how to treat books, they will enjoy the message.

(The Nebraska Library Commission receives free copies of children’s and young adult books for review from a number of publishers.  After review, the books are distributed free, via the Regional Library Systems, to Nebraska school and public libraries.)

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